Lou’s Views

“Unofficial” Minutes & Comments


BOC’s Special Meeting 10/05/18

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet
For more information » click here

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet Supplemental
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1. Discussion and Possible Award of Contract for the Canal Dredging Project – Town Manager Hewett

 Agenda Packet –
Award of Contract Canal Dredging Project

The second bid opening for this winter’s canal dredging project was held on Wednesday, October 3, 2018. Two bids were received – Marcol at $1.2 million and King at $840,000.     Bid tab is included as Attachment I.

Right Angle has certified King’s bid and is recommending award to King Dredging, Attachment 2. King’s bid is within budget.

Recommend   award of contract (Attachment.  3)  contingent on review by the Town attorney and subsequent execution of written agreement by Town Manager.

Recommended motion: Award the contract to King Dredging. The recommendation of award by the Board represents a preliminary determination and no legally binding acceptance of the bid or offer occurs until the Town has executed a written agreement.  The contract award is subject to King Dredging providing all bonds, insurance and other required documents and executing a contract in a form agreeable to the Town.



Right Angle Engineering has completed the public bidding process for the Maintenance Dredging Project- 2018. We are providing with this letter a copy of the bid tabulation from the public bid opening. We have evaluated the bid documents by the apparent low bidder, King Dredging Co. Inc., and have determined them to be responsive, responsible, and that the contract price is fair and reasonable.

We hereby recommend that the Town of Holden Beach award the contract to King Dredging in the amount of $840,000. We are also providing a copy of the Agreement that will be the contract document.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Recommended motion was approved as submitted. King Dredging is prepared, is a local vendor, has done this work before and does all his own work.

 2. Discussion and Possible Approval of Resolution 18-10, Resolution Establishing the Town of Holden Beach’s Position on Lockwood Folly Inlet Maintenance and Associated Least Cost Method of Disposal Placement – Commissioner Freer and Commissioner Butler

Agenda Packet –
Inlet & Beach Protection Board with input from both the town staff and the BOC’s submitted the following resolution:

 RESOLUTION 18-10

RESOLUTION ESTABLISHING THE TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH’S POSITION ON LOCKWOOD FOLLY INLET NAVIGATION MAINTENANCE AND ASSOCIATED LEAST COST METHOD OF DISPOSAL PLACEMENT

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach, North Carolina is a barrier island community bounded by the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW) to the North, the Atlantic Ocean to the South, the Shallotte Inlet to the West, and the Lockwood Folly Inlet to the East; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach has historically received and participated in navigation maintenance of the Lockwood Folly Inlet; and

WHEREAS, the Town has contributed significant funding for many years to piggyback on the project and dredge the bend widener; and

WHEREAS, referencing the NC Beach and Inlet Management Plan (BIMP), Table Vlll-16. Summary of Beach Nourishment Data -Region 1, Holden Beach was first nourished in 1971; and

WHEREAS, the referenced source of the historical nourishment according to the BIMP, Table Vlll-17. Historical Borrow Sources- Region 1 Beaches, was the shoals of the Lockwood Folly Inlet, the Holden Beach Waterways and the Wilmington Harbor Entrance Channel; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach has consistently been the recipient of sand via least cost method of disposal for the AIWW Inlet Crossing project since 2002; and

WHEREAS, the Town’s commitment to navigation maintenance projects is supported by our yearly budget plans and our long-term beach plan; and

WHEREAS, the stability of the Town’s East end depends on the least cost method of disposal for sand placement every two years as a result of the AIWW/LWF Inlet Crossing project; and

WHEREAS, the Town’s consultant engineer advises that sand placement on Holden Beach as part of the AIWW/LWF Inlet crossing project is critical as a storm damage reduction effort for the East end; and

WHEREAS, Holden Beach’s East end has the largest historical erosion rates on the island and in the County along Long Bay; and

WHEREAS, twenty-seven (27) oceanfront homes have been lost along the East end since 1993 due to erosion; and

WHEREAS, over the last year East end monitoring stations (264 OBE to 500 feet east of 337 OBE, the eastern most oceanfront house on Holden Beach) lost 67,000 cy; and

WHEREAS, the loss of approximately 60,000 cy/year is consistent with historical observations of annual data over the last 15 years.

WHEREAS, Oak West Stations 3-7 (6961Kings Lynn Drive to 5701West Beach Drive) lost 35,000 cy of upper beach (down to- 5 ft.) but actually saw a net gain in sediment of 96,000 cy (down to -12 ft.); and

WHEREAS, sand placed on the East end of Holden Beach travels through the natural nearshore transport system via littoral drift and establishes storm damage reduction barriers along the 9 mile stretch of beach; and

WHEREAS, Lockwood Folly outer ebb shoal sediment will travel naturally to Holden Beach via littoral drift and by taking this material and placing it elsewhere the East end could be negatively impacted; and

WHEREAS, direct sand placement via hydraulic dredging (pipeline) on Holden Beach is the preference of the Town to enhance storm damage protection, create habitat and provide increased recreation and tourism related opportunities; and

WHEREAS, an alternative LWF Inlet deepening and widening project as proposed by Brunswick County causes concern to the Town of Holden Beach’s consultant engineer in regard to possible adverse effects to the East end of Holden Beach, including accelerated erosion, loss of habitat, and an impact to tourism; and

WHEREAS, the accelerated erosion and loss of habitat may require placement of sandbags on the East and an eventual possibility of Joss of structures; and

WHEREAS, the deepening and widening project is estimated at a total cost of $4,132,000, with state grant assistance requested by Brunswick County in the amount of $2,754,650 and a local match of $1,377,350 with Brunswick County participating at a rate to be determined; and

WHEREAS, the cost of the proposed alternative LWF Inlet deepening and widening project is not deemed as fiscally achievable in the current operating budget.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach that it is in the best interest of the Town of Holden Beach to continue with navigation maintenance and beach nourishment efforts that have proven historically effective in mitigating East end erosional issues. The AIWW Inlet Crossing project is of the utmost importance to the Town of Holden Beach to remain on a cycle of every two years for this purpose and placement of sand on Holden Beach follows the Corps’ fiscal responsibility to utilize least cost method of disposal for their projects.

BE IT ALSO RESOLVED that if a decision to take the risk of the deepening and widening project does occur in the future, it is critical that Holden Beach be the recipient of the sand. Without significant monitoring to prove no adverse effects to Holden Beach by placement on a neighboring beach, the Town supports Applied Technology Management’s position that placement anywhere other than Holden   Beach would cause adverse impacts to our East end.


Commissioner Kwiatkowski submitted the following alternative resolution:

ALTERNATE – RESOLUTION 18-10

LET IT BE KNOWN THAT:

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach, NC (the Town) is a barrier island community located in Brunswick County; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach barrier island is a west to east oriented island, bounded by the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW) on the north, the Atlantic Ocean on the south facing the Long Bay region of Brunswick County, the Shallotte Inlet to the west and the Lockwood Folly (LWF) Inlet to the east; and

WHEREAS, Holden Beach’s East End has the largest historical erosion rates on the island, with twenty-seven (27) oceanfront homes having been lost since 1993 due to erosion; and

WHEREAS, fifteen (15) years of annual monitoring data for Holden Beach show that the East End loses approximately 60,000 cubic yards (cy) of sand per annum, a number consistent with monitoring data showing loss of 67,000 cy between East End monitoring stations (264 Ocean Blvd East to 500 feet east of 337 Ocean Blvd East) over the last year; and

WHEREAS, the LWF Inlet is a federally authorized navigation channel maintained by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), and the AIWW Inlet Crossing navigation channel is also maintained by the USACE; and

WHEREAS, dredging of certain sections of the AIWW, i.e., the “inlet crossing”, has provided beach compatible sand via the least cost method of disposal for USACE projects; and

WHEREAS, referencing the NC Beach and Inlet Management Plan (BIMP), Table Vlll- 16. Summary of Beach Nourishment Data-Region 1, Holden Beach was first nourished in 1971; and

WHEREAS, referenced sources of historical nourishment according to the SIMP Table Vlll-17. Historical Borrow Sources-Region 1 Beaches include the Holden Beach Waterways and the shoals of the LWF Inlet; and

WHEREAS, the Town has historically received and participated in navigation maintenance of the LWF Inlet; and

WHEREAS, the Town has contributed significant funding for many years to piggyback on AIWN/LWF Inlet dredging projects; and

WHEREAS, the Town’s commitment to navigation maintenance is supported by our long-term beach plan and yearly budget plans; and

WHEREAS, the Town’s consultant engineer, Applied Technology Management (ATM) advises that sand placement on Holden Beach as part of the AIWW/LFI crossing project is critical as a storm damage reduction effort for the East End; and

WHEREAS, the Town has consistently been the recipient of sand via least cost method of disposal for the AIWW Inlet Crossing Project since 2002; and

WHEREAS, the stability of the Town’s East End depends on the least cost method of placement at a minimum every two years as a result of the AIWW/LWF Inlet Crossing Project; and

WHEREAS, the Town’s East End last received sand in March 2017;

LET IT FURTHER BE KNOWN THAT:

WHEREAS, on Oak Island, a barrier island to the East of Holden Beach, data from monitoring Oak West Stations 3-7 (6961 King Lane’s Drive to 5701 West Beach Drive} lost 35,000 cy of upper beach measured down to -5 ft but actually saw a net gain in sediment of 96,000 cy measured down to-12ft; and

WHEREAS, natural nearshore transport of sand via littoral drift occurs from east to west in Long Bay, making sand placement on the West End of Oak Island of time-limited benefit while  increasing the negative impact on LWF Inlet; and

WHEREAS, LWF outer ebb shoal sediment will travel naturally to Holden Beach via littoral drift and by taking this material and placing it elsewhere the East End could be negatively impacted; and

WHEREAS, sand placed on the East End of Holden Beach travels through the natural nearshore transport system via littoral drift and establishes storm damage reduction barriers along the 9 mile stretch of beach as an added benefit; and

WHEREAS, direct sand placement via hydraulic dredging (pipeline) on Holden Beach is the preference of the Town to enhance storm damage protection, create habitat and provide increased recreation and tourism related opportunities; and

WHEREAS, an alternative LWF Inlet deepening and widening project as proposed by Brunswick County causes concern to the Town’s consultant engineer ATM in regard to possible adverse effects to the East End of Holden Beach, including accelerated erosion, loss of habitat, a negative impact on tourism, and need for placement of sandbags and eventual possibility of loss of structures; and

WHEREAS, no historical monitoring or  state of the art modeling has been produced to demonstrate the benefits of such a project outweigh the risk of adverse effects; and

WHEREAS, the deepening and widening project is estimated at a total cost of $4,132,000, with state grant assistance requested by Brunswick County in the amount of $2,754,650 and a local match of $1,377,350 with Brunswick County participating at a rate yet to be determined; and

WHEREAS, the cost of the proposed alternative LWF Inlet deepening and widening project is not deemed as fiscally achievable in the current operating budget;

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach that it is in the best interest of the Town to continue with the navigation maintenance and beach nourishment efforts that have proven historically effective in mitigating East End erosional issues. The AIWW Inlet Crossing Project is of the utmost importance to the Town of Holden Beach to remain on a cycle of every two years for this purpose, and placement on Holden Beach follows the USACE’s fiscal responsibility to utilize least cost method of disposal for their projects.

BE IT ALSO RESOLVED that before a decision is taken on the deepening and widening project does occur, it must be supported by a data driven cost benefit analysis that includes possible environmental impacts. If the decision is taken to move forward with the project, it is critical that Holden Beach be the recipient of the sand. Without significant monitoring data to prove no adverse effects to Holden Beach by placement of sand on a neighboring beach, the Town supports ATM’s position that placement anywhere other than Holden Beach would cause adverse impacts to our East End.

A decision was made – Approved (4-1)

Commissioner Kwiatkowski tweaked and reorganized the original document. Inlet & Beach Protection Board is an advisory Board and their role is to give advice to the BOC’s. It’s the BOC’s responsibility to make the decision which resolution to approve. The Board accepted and approved the alternate resolution with immediate distribution

This is the fourth time (PAR Course, Bridgeview Park, Sewer System Upgrade, LWF Navigation Maintenance) the BOC’s have dissed an Advisory Board by completely disregarding their recommendations. Obviously, it’s their call. But what message does it send to the committee members, when all of their time and effort are for naught. At the very least it’s just disrespectful.

Holden Beach commissioners award canal dredging contract
Holden Beach commissioners at a special meeting Oct. 5 unanimously voted to award this winter’s canal dredging projecting to King Dredging of Beaufort. Assistant Town Manager Christy Ferguson said a second bid opening for this winter’s canal dredging project was held Oct. 3, with two bids received: a $1.2 million bid from Marcol Dredging of North Charleston, S.C., and a $840,000 bid from King Dredging. Ferguson said King’s bid was within budget, and said Right Angle Engineering of Wilmington emailed Holden Beach Town Manager David Hewett on Oct. 4 to recommend the town award the contract to King Dredging after evaluating its bid documents and determining them to be “responsive, responsible and that the contract price is fair and reasonable.” Documentation provided by Ferguson shows the dredging will be done at Holden Beach Harbor, Heritage Harbor and Harbor Acres. The dredging consists of conveying dredged material to a designated disposal site, disposing of the dredged material and repairing the town’s existing Scotch Bonnet disposal area. Ferguson said the dredging process is to be completed by March 31, 2019, according to the contract.

Commissioners also approved a revised version of Resolution 18-10: Resolution Establishing the Town of Holden Beach’s Position on Lockwood Folly Inlet Navigation Maintenance and Associated Least Cost Method of Disposal Placement. The original resolution was provided to commissioners by Holden Beach’s Inlet and Beach Protection Board. Protection board member Vicki Myers told commissioners at Friday’s special meeting the original draft of the resolution was provided to the board by the town at its Aug. 16 meeting. Commissioner Pat Kwiatkowski said she revised the document by adding new verbiage for clarity and reorganizing paragraphs. Commissioner Joe Butler asked who should receive the approved resolution. Hewett said whichever version of the resolution is approved, it should be sent to county commissioners, the North Carolina Division of Water Quality: Water Resources, state Rep. Frank Iler, state Sen. Bill Rabon, Congressman David Rouzer and to the Army Corps of Engineers. Commissioners Peter Freer and John Fletcher said they were reluctant to change a document that was already put together well with a lot of effort. Commissioner Mike Sullivan said committees are put in place in the town to give commissioners advice, but it’s up to commissioners to decide what to do with it. Kwiatkowski asked Hewett and Ferguson what they thought about the issue since they have the most experience sending out documents. Hewett said either document will work, but the revised version refines and reorganizes.  Ferguson said it’s whatever commissioners’ pleasure is, as long as the town gets the best version so it can be where it needs to be. Mayor Alan Holden raised concerns about the document painting a picture of the Holden Beach side of Lockwood Folly Inlet as the most erodible place in the Long Bay area, “so what does that do to investors, insurance companies, and the list goes on?” he asked. He asked if anyone in the room thought the east end of Holden Beach is eroding faster than the east end of Ocean Isle Beach, and no one said they thought so. “This is a good hard work, good exercise, but it’s not the way it works in the real world,” Holden said. “Getting things done is behind the scenes communications with the corps and the right kinds of people. They know that stuff. I’m wondering, who are we trying to influence with this? And I really don’t know the answer to that question.” Holden also questioned the accuracy of the document. Myers told commissioners the information came from Fran Way of Applied Technology & Management Inc. — the expert, as far as she’s concerned. She told the board the town drafted of the original version of the resolution. She also said the committee serves in an advisory capacity, which means the commissioners can decide what they want but she urged them to run it through a spell and grammar checker. Commissioners decided to remove the portion of the resolution that stated Holden Beach’s east end erosion was the worst in the Long Bay area and instead say it’s the worst area of erosion on the island. Butler made a motion to accept Kwiatkowski’s document, including revisions made during Friday’s special meeting, and amended the motion to approve the resolution Friday and for it to immediately be sent to everyone on the list Hewett provided. Commissioners voted 4-1 to approve the motion, with Sullivan casting the dissenting vote.
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Oak Island beach-strand surveys will assist in securing FEMA aid to restore dunes
Engineers working with survey crews started post-Florence and Michael surveys of Oak Island Monday, part of the lengthy, bureaucratic process required for the town to receive federal disaster aid. Crews with backpack-mounted GPS devices will take detailed measurements of the dunes, berm and strand at more than 50 locations and follow up with surveys from boats to document how the storms affected the shore and nearshore environment. Johnny Martin, contract engineer for Moffatt & Nichol, said surveyors would also study the Eastern Channel, already badly shoaled, as well as Lockwood Folly Inlet. Martin put the initial estimate for damages and stormwater mitigation efforts at $12.2-million, but stressed that the number was a rough guess used to help state emergency managers plan their budgets. He said the post-Matthew emergency dune took a hit, as did parts of the newly finished beach on the east end of town, built with sand from clearing the Wilmington Harbor shipping channel. Last week, town manager David Kelly noted that in addition to possible reimbursement for losses from the hurricanes, Oak Island is also in line to receive $8.2-million in state and federal funds to rebuild a sea turtle habitat from around SE 58th Street west to about Ocean Crest Pier. Town officials are hopeful they’ll combine the projects, possibly kick in another $1-million or so to stretch out the work and put sand on parts of the beach in winter 2019. Martin said it would take that much time to confirm the sources of sand and obtain environmental permits. The turtle habitat project may utilize sand from an offshore deposit called the Central Reach, the same source Holden Beach recently tapped for its large-scale project. On a related note, Martin said the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers expects to seek bids by next week on dredging the Intracoastal Waterway crossing of the Lockwood Folly River. That job, by a private contractor, is expected to place beach-quality sand on an erosional hot-spot on the west end of Oak Island, generally in the vicinity of the 6400 block of West Beach Drive. Also, the corps has plans to perform maintenance dredging of Lockwood Folly Inlet, using a sidecast dredge that can’t put sand on the beach. Whether and how that project was delayed or changed by the hurricanes isn’t yet clear.
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BOC’s Special Meeting 10/23/18

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet
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1. Poyner Spruill LLP Presentation Concerning Consulting Services –
Mayor Holden

Poyner Spruill
The firm is the North Carolina law firm member of SCG Legal, an association of fifty independent law firms located in the fifty state capitals.
For more information » click here

The Ferguson Group
The Ferguson Group (TFG) is a bipartisan government relations consulting firm founded in 1982. For 34 years, TFG has specialized in representing local communities on federal issues in Washington, D.C., where the firm is headquartered. Building on our team’s unmatched experience in promoting and protecting local governments and their partners, TFG provides our clients with effective tools and strategies to shape national policy, obtain resources for local priorities, and get results in Washington. We help our clients build stronger communities through securing grant funding, navigating federal financing tools, and project authorizations. We also help our clients advocate for regulatory and legislative policy changes and provide strategic planning and consulting services.
For more information » click here

They brought in the big bats to make the presentation. Clearly, they are a prestigious white shoe law firm that are more than capable of assisting us. Essentially its one-stop shopping with them able to handle whatever projects we have. Apparently the first step would be to identify projects and prioritize them. Interestingly the Town Manager and Mayor presented them with a list of projects without consulting with the Board. The wish list presented to them includes twenty-one (21) projects with a federal component, fourteen (14) projects with a state component and twenty-four (24) projects with a local component.


BOC’s Regular Meeting 10/23/18

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet
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1. Public Comments on Agenda Items

There were comments made regarding the following:

Elaine Jordan – General Counsel / The Coastal Companies
Sewer and Water System Development Fees – pleased they reset the fees, recommended they include stakeholders in the discussion before making them permanent.

Second Water Tower – would like to see a lot more work done before a decision is made.

Ashley Royal – former Commissioner
Poyner Spruill Consulting Services – Attended Special Meeting and saw presentation made to the Board. When he was on the Board they chose not to take any action. Since then his position has changed and he sees the need for their services. He encourages the Board to seriously consider and approve hiring this consulting firm.


2. Discussion and Possible Action on Poyner Spruill LLP Presentation Concerning Consulting Services – Mayor Holden

Previously reported –
It has been the Mayor’s position that we need to hire a professional consulting firm because we need representation on multiple topics at the local, state and national levels of government.

Poyner Spruill
For more information » click here

Previously reported – November 2015
Presentation by Mike McIntyre, Senior Advisor and Director of Government Relations, Poyner Spruill
Mayor Holden said the purpose of the presentation was to shed light on the services available to the Town. Basically, this was an infomercial, a shameless plug for the firm’s services. What Mike was selling is his ability to leverage his contacts and relationships that he developed during his eighteen years of government service. Their role would be to help us maximize our dollars with the larger projects like the terminal groin and central reach project. A proposed contract was already sent to the Town Manager.

Former Congressman McIntyre joins firm as ‘Director of Gov’t Relations’
The future has come into view for former Congressman Mike McIntyre. After months of saying he was going to look into possibilities in both the public and private sectors, the nine-term member of the U.S. House of Representatives has landed a position as Senior Advisor and Director of Government Relations with Poyner Spruill, LLP.

McIntyre served 18 years as the representative for North Carolina’s Seventh Congressional District, which included Wilmington and most of southeastern North Carolina. He retired in December of 2014 after not seeking re-election for a tenth term. The Democrat from Lumberton rose to prominent positions on both the House Agriculture and Armed Services Committees before stepping down.

“Poyner Spruill shares my commitment to the people of North Carolina and our state’s prosperity,” McIntyre said in an email news release from Poyner Spruill. “I look forward to opportunities to focus on many of these same important issues I’ve worked on my whole career.” “Congressman McIntyre brings a deep knowledge of local, state and federal issues and a proven ability to work across political lines,” Poyner Spruill Managing Partner Joseph B. Dempster Jr. said in the same release. “His experience with agriculture, military, health care, coastal, business and economic development issues will be a tremendous asset for our clients, and we are delighted to have him join the firm.”

According to Hillary Davis, Marketing Coordinator with Poyner Spruill, McIntyre will be working from the company’s office in Raleigh. “His focus will be on federal and state issues, as well as local and regional issues, including, agriculture, military, coastal, business and economic development issues,” Davis said in an email response to questions.
Read more »
click here

Update –
McIntyre did a brief recap of presentation that was made earlier in the day on what they can do for us. The consensus appeared to be that we need someone to speak on our behalf and they can make it happen.

Questions that remained to be answered are as follows:
  1)
What are we going to get?
  2)
How much will it cost?

Mayor Holden remarked that he was “begging the Board to give it their full consideration” he then prodded them into asking for a written proposal from the firm.

No decision was made – No action taken

Mayor Holden has been selling this consulting gig for at least the last three years. It is his opinion that we are wasting our time, that nothing gets done in government without having people working for you behind the scenes. Ostensibly we are trying to punch above our weight and make sure we are able to impact things in our favor. I’m of the mindset that it doesn’t matter how much we spend for a consultant; the bottom-line is that we only have approximately four hundred voters which is not enough to make any impact and get things done. It makes more sense to me to work with the other coastal communities where the cost is shared, and the number of voters does matter. We were a member of the group formally known as the Brunswick Beaches Consortium which rechristened itself as Brunswick Shoreline Protection in the wake of the scandal of Caswell Beach Mayor Harry Simmons’ financial dealings while in charge of the group. Holden Beach contributed $143,038 the amount prosecutor’s claim Simmons embezzled is $94,418. After the Brunswick Beach Consortium debacle, I can understand their reluctance to go down that path again. Don’t disagree that we can use assistance in government relations to get things done. That said, I question the need to hire such a prestigious white-shoe firm to do that for us.


3. Discussion and Possible Action – Attorney Clark Wright Presenting Potential Impacts to Holden Beach Shoreline Protection Efforts Due to Federal Litigation Between National Audubon Society (Southern Environmental Law Center) and Ocean Isle Beach – Commissioner Freer and Commissioner Fletcher

The best data and science available show that when a terminal groin is built, one side wins and the other side loses. OIB terminal groin will negatively impact the west end of Holden Beach.  Clark questioned whether we want to get involved in the pending litigation. If we do, now would be the time to do it. He recommends that the Town give it serious consideration. The first step should be to decide what are concerns are. In a rather long sales pitch he suggested a desired course of action for us to take. Since we should have concerns, the best option and most cost-effective way is to participate and file as a friend of court brief (Amicus Brief).  This is time-sensitive so they will need to decide rather quickly. He gave a back of the envelope cost estimate of between $9,000 to $19,000 to do the work.

No decision was made – No action taken

Seeking a Better Approach to Erosion on Ocean Isle Beach
Terminal groins, or rock walls built across the beach into the ocean, were prohibited on North Carolina’s coast for more than 30 years because they unnaturally trap sand in one location—robbing nearby beaches of sand and increasing erosion elsewhere. A proposed terminal groin at Ocean Isle Beach would be no different – an expensive, destructive project with little overall benefit to the town and surrounding communities. For these reasons the Southern Environmental Law Center, on behalf of Audubon North Carolina, has challenged in federal court the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ approval of a terminal groin for Ocean Isle Beach. The lawsuit claims that the Corps approved the multi-million-dollar project without fairly considering other alternatives that would be cheaper for the town’s taxpayers, would adequately protect vulnerable properties, and maintain wildlife habitat on the east end of Ocean Isle (one of the few remaining natural inlets available for shorebirds!). “The terminal groin at Ocean Isle is bad for taxpayers, wildlife and everyone who loves to visit this special place on North Carolina’s coast,” explains Heather Hahn, Executive Director of Audubon North Carolina.  “Fortunately, it isn’t necessary. There are more effective ways to manage erosion– options that would protect threatened properties, cost residents less money, and work with nature, rather than against it.” The proposed terminal groin would be particularly devastating to the undeveloped, unspoiled refuge on the island’s east end.  This unique area has long been a haven for boaters, families and wildlife alike – each drawn by the peace and tranquility offered by this undeveloped area of shoreline. It also offers a special place where birds can eat, rest, and nest. “We’re in court because the Corps failed to fairly consider alternatives that would cost Ocean Isle less, manage erosion, and protect the natural beach on the east end of the island when it approved this destructive project,” said Geoff Gisler, senior attorney at the Southern Environmental Law Center.  “Federal law requires the Corps to choose the least destructive alternative; with the terminal groin, it approved the most destructive.”  Shorebirds that eat, rest, and nest on inlet shorelines cannot “just go somewhere else”. Ocean Isle’s habitat is increasingly rare, and the future for many of these bird species is in danger. For birds and beachgoers alike, we hope to find a better approach.
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4. Brunswick Avenue Paving Options – Shane Lippard, Right Angle Engineering (Town Manager Hewett)
. a.
Discussion of Alternatives and Direction to Staff

David indicated he was attempting to get a framework on how the Board wants to address this issue. It is an attempt on his part to get a running start on next years budget workshops. Project is for Brunswick Avenue West only. You read that right, from Rothschild to High Point is all we are talking about. If you have ever driven down the street, you know that settlement has occurred, and the pavement is wavy making for a roller coaster type ride. The game plan is to utilize wedging for the low areas and then a layer of asphalt over the top of the entire road. Discussion was whether to go all in or do a test segment. The approach they agreed to is to do the worst areas only in the first year. Engineers Preliminary Construction Cost Estimate $255,194. In 2015 the Board implemented a tax increase of $.010 that would generate approximately $115,000 annually for infrastructure, specifically street paving and maintenance. With no additional funds being allocated they could do a little less then half of the project in 2020.

WEDGE AND LEVEL
When the surface of a pavement is irregular, the surface is required to be brought to a uniform grade and cross section. A leveling course is used when the road surface is so irregular that the surface cannot be corrected with the normal leveling capabilities of the paver. Wedges of hot mix asphalt are used to level sags and depressions in an old pavement prior to the paving operation.


5. Discussion and Consideration of Professional Engineering Report for Second Water Tower – Shane Lippard, Right Angle (Town Manager Hewett)
. a.
Direction to Staff

Agenda Packet –
SUMMARY, CONCLUSION, and RECOMMENDATIONS
The Town of Holden Beach proposed to construct a new water storage tank in the West End section of the island community to better serve existing customers and projected population. The existing 300,000-gallon tower and   water   distribution   system   provides   potable   water   for approximately 3,000 customers. While the existing tower can provide the NCDEQ required amount of potable storage, fire flow capacity does not meet the State Fire Marshall recommendations. For a spherical elevated storage tank, the proposed least construction cost is estimated to be $1,378,000 with overall project costs at $1,754,000.

Total time required is approximately nineteen (19) months.

ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS
  1)
Ocean Boulevard Tank – the estimated project costs are $1,754,000
.   2)
Heron Landing Tank – the estimated project costs are $1,925,000
.   3)
Seagull Drive Tank – the estimated project costs are $2,004,000

Basically, we are not meeting capacity requirements during prime time when the population here soars. Right Anglr considered three locations. Seagull has the second water feed from Brunswick County, but the Town does not own any property there. OBW location is the lowest cost alternative and we currently have ten parcels there. The overriding consideration is that Tri-Beach Fire Department informed us that the fire hydrants gallons per minute fire flow west of 878 OBW is significantly below what is required, fire flow capacity does not meet the State Fire Marshall recommendations. This does negatively impact insurance rates for the community. Conceding the need for an additional water tower the question that needs to be asked is: How would we pay for this? Realizing this is a huge expense and based on the recent brouhaha on other issues they took the cautious step of saying that they need to better understand their options and get more information before deciding. Ultimately, they chose to send this to Planning & Zoning Board for further analysis.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

The Town owns ten (10) parcels in the 800 block which we obtained on 04/21/13. They are as follows: 46BC001, 246BC010, 246BC011, 246BC012, 246BC013, 246BC014, 246BC015, 246BC016, 246BC01604, and 246BC01609.

For more information » click here


6. Coastal Engineering Proposal for Modeling and Report on Optimum Placement of Dredge Materials from Navigation Projects – Fran Way Applied Technology and Management (Assistant Town Manager Ferguson)
a.
Ordinance 18-14, An Ordinance Amending Ordinance 18-10, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance for Fiscal Year 2018 – 2019 (Amendment No. 2)

Applied Technology Management
ATM is a coastal engineering firm hired by the town to do the following:

  1. Annual monitoring, data collection and reporting
  2. Assess sand erosion
  3. Evaluate nourishment
  4. FEMA projects cost reimbursement support
  5. Meet government regulatory permitting conditions

Agenda Packet –
Christy Ferguson
Due to the recent activities with disposal of sand from the Lockwood Folly Inlet, Town representatives have expressed a desire to have additional modeling and analysis completed by the Town’s coastal engineer. This data will be used to prove the most economical and logical placement occurs via least cost method of disposal on Holden Beach.

Applied Technology Management
ATM is pleased to present this scope of services to the Town of Holden Beach for a sedimentation analysis of Lockwood Folly Inlet and its nearby ocean shorelines.

It is ATM’s understanding that the Town of Holden Beach wishes to investigate and quantify the sediment processes along the ocean shorelines that are predominantly influenced by Lockwood Folly Inlet.   Figure 1 presents a schematic of the study area.  ATM will build upon its previous studies and modeling for this effort.

Additionally, an analysis of the LWF lnlet /AIWW Crossing (LWFIX) dredging and beach placement projects will occur. Dredged material from LWFIX dredging has historically been placed on the eastern end of Holden Beach approximately every 2 years. However, this system has recently been interrupted and the future of this project has come into question.  The analysis proposed will look at LWFIX disposal on both the east end of Holden Beach and the west end of Oak Island.

$28,500     Updated Modeling Analysis
$18,500     LWF Inlet Sediment Processes Analysis
$47,000     Total

ATM submitted a proposal to do two tasks that should take a couple of months to complete. The east end of the island needs sand nourishment every two years which we have been getting from USACE inlet dredging projects. The purpose of hiring them to do these tasks is to clearly demonstrate the best place to put the sand from the dredging of the inlet is the east end of Holden Beach. The report will provide engineering data to support that position. The Board feels it is both necessary and timely to authorize the work.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Moved funds of $47,000
From Revenue account #50.0399.0000 to Expense account#50.0710.0900


7. Resolution 18-11, Designation of Applicant’s Agent (Hurricane Florence Resolution) – Assistant Town Manager Ferguson

Agenda Packet –
In attending the Hurricane Florence FEMA Public Assistance Applicant Briefing, the Town was advised that a resolution would need to be passed to appoint an applicant designee from the Town.  The resolution form will be supplied digitally from the Department of Public Safety.   The applicant designee will be responsible as signatory for the FEMA application process and formation of project worksheets.    A primary and secondary designee is required.   This memo requests the BOC designate Town Manager David Hewett as the primary contact and Assistant Town Manager Ferguson and Fiscal Operations Clerk Lockner as secondary contacts on the FEMA Resolution.

Suggested motion: The BOC hereby designates Town Manager David Hewett as the primary applicant designee and Assistant Town Manager Ferguson and Fiscal Operations Clerk Lockner as secondary contacts on the FEMA Resolution.

Previously reported – November 2016
Resolution 16-12 authorizes Town Manager Hewett and Fiscal Operations Clerk Lockner to execute and file applications for assistance on behalf of the Town. Approval of this resolution is necessary to move forward with requesting assistance relating to Hurricane Matthew.

Update –
Simply part of the process that we establish an official point of contact to process FEMA reimbursement requests

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Recommended motion was approved as submitted.


8. Receipt of Inlet and Beach Protection Board Report – Commissioner Freer

Agenda Packet –
August
The Inlet and Beach Protection Board (IBPB) met August 23 and the following issues were addressed:

Lockwood Folly Inlet Dredging:  In concurrence with staff, after discussion and careful consideration, the IBPB has asked that the attached draft resolution be placed on your September agenda for your consideration.  As stated in the resolution, dredging of the inlet and placement of the sand on Holden Beach is of the utmost importance and we feel that the issue cannot wait to be addressed in the Annual Beach Monitoring Report.

Annual Beach Monitoring Report:  The group also heard from the Town’s Beach Engineer Fran Way on the state of the beach and received his input on the Lockwood Folly situation.  More details will be available as the Annual Beach Monitoring Report is completed in October.

Future Plans: The Board also made plans for intended participation in future internal and external meetings and the goals discussed at the joint meeting.

September
The Inlet and Beach Protection Board (IBPB) met September 27 and the following issues were addressed:

Status and the Beach and Inlets Post-Florence: Staff provided an overview of conditions and issues relative to the beach strand and inlets in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence. Overall the beach and inlets fared well. The Central Reach Project fulfilled its job as a shoreline protection project. The preliminary post-storm beach survey has been completed and the results have been sent to ATM for analysis. The Corps of Engineers will be completing their survey of the inlets in the next couple of days.

Status of Lockwood Folly Inlet Dredging Issues: Since the last IBPB meeting it has been learned that another dredging project will be awarded to Oak Island. The stated reason is a lack of easements. The issue was discussed.

Status of Resolution Establishing the Town of Holden Beach’s Position on Lockwood Folly Inlet Navigation Maintenance and Associated Least Cost Method of Disposal Placement: Because of the cancellation of the September BOC meeting the draft resolution from the IBPB is still pending. We still feel this is of the utmost importance.  Several small changes were made to the document.

Previously reported – April 2018
Ordinance 18-02 / § 35.07 
(D) The Chair of the Inlet and Beach Protection Board shall submit a report in writing of any suggestions, plans, recommendations, and the like to the Town Clerk following each meeting of the Inlet and Beach Protection Board for inclusion in the following month’s Board of Commissioners agenda packets.

Update –
No issues, Ordinance requires written report from this Board

Why is the Beach Board the only Board
required to submit these reports?  


9. Police Report – Detective Jeremy Dixon

Police Patch

.
It’s that time of year, rental season ends, and break-in season officially starts

 

Requested that we all serve as the eyes and ears for law enforcement.

If you know something, hear something, or see something –
call 911 and let police deal with it.

Crime Prevention 101 – Don’t make it easy for them
Don’t leave vehicles unlocked
Don’t leave valuables in your vehicles

Neighborhood Watch

  • Need to look out for each other and report any suspicious activity
  • Call 911 if you see or hear anything suspicious
  • Fill out Keep Check Request Form if you will be out of town
  • Submit completed Property Registration Form
  • Pickup copy of Protecting Your Home

Keep Check Request Form
. a) Complete the form and return it to the Police Department
. b)
Officers check your property in your absence
.
Property Registration Form
. a)
Record of items in your home that have a value of over $100
. b)
Complete the form and return it to the Police Department


10. Executive Session Pursuant to North Carolina General Statute 143-318.11(a)(3), To Consult with the Town Attorney

They went into Executive Session and it felt like they were never coming back. After at least forty-five minutes they came back, and no explanation was given about what was discussed or decided.

11. Discussion of Activities and Timelines to Re-conduct the Determination of Maximum Sewer and Water System Development Fees and Subsequently Set “Permanent Fees Before the End of 2018 – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Previously reported –
They repealed and replaced the development fee schedule
.   1)
Repealed Resolution 18-05
.   2)
Replaced with the following interim fee schedule:
.     •
Water Capacity Fee is $100 per bedroom
.     •
Sewer Capacity Fee is $2,700 per bedroom
A five (5) bedroom in the sewer fee schedule before June 30th was $13,125
A five (5) bedroom in the new interim sewer fee schedule after June 30th is $13,500
A five (5) bedroom in both the old and the new interim water fee schedule is $500
Total cost of $14,000 vs. $13,625, approximately what the fees were before July 1st

For those property owners that already paid their sewer share fee they will get a credit of $2,700 per bedroom up to and including a five-bedroom house; additional bedrooms will be assessed at $2,700 per bedroom. This is an interim fee schedule until they have an opportunity to reevaluate the situation.

Update –
All Pat said is that the interim rates would remain in effect for the next ninety (90) days which takes us into 2019. No discussion of activities, timelines, or variables being considered were shared with the public.

 A decision was made – Approved unanimously

 ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Frankly, I think everyone was expecting a little more information than what was given.

12. Discussion and Possible Action – Construction Management Services of the Vacuum Sewer System #4 Upgrade Status Report – Public Works Director Clemmons

Previously reported – December 2017
McGill and Associates were commissioned to perform a Sewer Study to evaluate sewer system vulnerability reducing measures. A fiscal year 2017-2018 budget appropriation of $1,413,000 was made to accommodate total programmatic expenses of Lift Station #4 improvements. Green Engineering firm was awarded the $158,000 contract for Sewer System #4 upgrade. Green Engineering will provide all engineering services required to construct a vulnerability reducing structure of Lift Station #4.

Previously reported – April 2018
Four (4) meetings have been held between staff and the engineering firm to date. The final plans were delivered to the Town and have been reviewed and approved by the Building Inspector. Deliverables – Timeline has been revised. Buildings were designed in the same style as Town Hall. We are currently on schedule, but Chris cautioned that it was still early in the game. The Board requested monthly updates, reporting on whether we remained on schedule and within budget.

Previously reported – May 2018
We’ve had a slight setback, we did not receive the three (3) bids required to move forward. Officially we accepted no bids, the two bids submitted will be held and opened upon the completion of the second go round. Chris was a little surprised and disappointed since their appeared to be a lot of interest when they held meeting with vendors. We will need to start the bid process over. The protocols on the second bid process do not require the three bids but the caveat is we can only consider quality bids.

Previously reported – June 2018
BOC’s SPECIAL MEETING / May 23, 2018
Approved award of the Lift Station #4 upgrade contract to T.A. Loving Company in the amount of $1,205,000

Total project cost went from $1,413,000 to $1,695,700 or a $282,700 difference
Contingency funds were reduced from $157,400 to $52,480 or a $104,920 difference
Bottomline, the project cost just went up $387,620 ($282,700 + $104,920) or @27% (Yikes!)

A pre-construction meeting is scheduled for June 28th
We should have a tentative construction start date then

Previously reported – July 2018
A pre-construction meeting was held on June 28th
The contractor was given notice to proceed
Mobilization is scheduled for the first week of August

Concerns:
. 1) Time to get materials – delay waiting for foundation steel
. 2)
Storm Season

Previously reported – August 2018
Reviewed progress to date, despite the rain they are still on schedule, gave some tentative project timelines. It’s all good!

Update –
Making good progress, despite the two storm events they are still on track to complete project on schedule.


13. Discussion and Possible Action – As a Follow-up to the Implementation of Parking Action Steps Identified by P&Z/ Citizens’ Advisory Group and Approved by the Commissioners Last December the Following is Recommended (Commissioner Butler and Commissioner Freer):
1.
After the 2018 Summer Season, Review the Phase 1 Progress of the Approved Action Steps Outlined on Page 2 of the April 17, 2018 BOC Regular Meeting Agenda
2.
Request P&Z to Review Mid-year 2018 – 2019 Parking Project Action Steps and Report Back to BOC

Previously reported – April 2018
Discussion and Possible Action on Recommendations from Citizen Advisory Committee Report on
Parking for Implementation Prior to the 2018 Beach Season – Commissioner Butler
The following are the first phase of recommendations that have been reviewed in the previous BOC meeting. This information also includes the recommendation to revise Chapter 72 Ordinance, Parking Regulations, Section 72.02 Section K that was discussed during the same meeting. (It shall be a violation of this chapter to leave standing any portion of a vehicle in a lawful parking area between the hours of 2:00 a.m. and 5:00a.m.).

  1. Develop a visitor map of all available approved public parking locations throughout the
  2. Parking direction signage, to include signage at the various identified public parking
  3. Better utilization of current public parking spaces at the various locations with either the use of bumpers; curb stops or paint
  4. Revise the Town Ordinance 05 to accommodate the recommendation for property owners to have an option to preserve their landscaping and irrigation systems by installing a post and rope in the right­ of-way not to exceed 24″ in grade.
  5. Develop a communications plan pertaining to parking
  6. Police enforcement and monitoring is required to support implementation of the changes

a) Ordinance 18-07, An Ordinance Amending the Holden Beach Code of Ordinances, Chapter 72: Parking Regulations (Section 72.03 Parking Regulated on Public Streets and Rights-of-Way)
b) Ordinance 18-08, An Ordinance Amending the Holden Beach Code of Ordinances, Chapter 95: Streets (Section 95.05 Street Rights-of-Way)

Action steps adopted:

  1. Develop a visitor map of all available approved parking locations throughout the island.
  2. Provide signage at the bottom of the bridge as to parking locations, to include signage at these locations.
  3. Better utilization of current parking through the use of parking space marking and dividers.
  4. Property owners have an option to prohibit parking in rights-of-way.
  5. Town ordinances impacted by the changes to be revised accordingly.
  6. Develop a communication plan regarding the parking revisions to improve the parking issues on the island.
  7. Police enforcement and monitoring required to support implementation of the changes to include visitor guidance.
  8. Change parking violations to civil offenses, allowing the Town to keep the fines.
  9. No overnight parking in public parking areas.

Staff has implemented Phase I for the tourist season this year.

Update –
Joe reviewed and compared what was supposed to be done and what has been done. A number of issues had been discussed that were not incorporated in Phase I. Board sent this to the Planning & Zoning Board with instructions to reinstate Citizen Advisory Parking Committee to identify work to be done in Phase II.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


14. Discussion and Possible Action on Solid Waste Agreement and Items Relating to Solid Waste Management – Town Manager Hewett
. a.
Amendment to Solid Waste and Recyclable Collection, Transportation and Disposal Agreement
.
b. Ordinance 18-15, An Ordinance Amending Ordinance 18-10, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance for Fiscal Year 2018 – 2019 (Amendment No. 3)
. c.
Resolution 18-11, Resolution Amending the Holden Beach Fee Schedule

Agenda Packet –
Agreement is hereby amended as follows:
Curbside Recycle -WI will provide a 95 gallon recycle container for the voluntary program for a price of $5.13 per month per cart, or $61.56 annually per cart.  There will be no processing fees charged for recyclables through December 31, 2018.  

Based on an increase in contract subscription fees from Waste Industries of $61.56.  A budget amendment of $9,883 is proposed to offset new recycling rates.

RESOLUTION 18-12
RESOULUTION AMENDING THE HOLDEN BEACH FEE SCHEDULE

WHEREAS, the Holden Beach Board of Commissioners is amending their Solid Waste and Recyclable Collection, Transportation and Disposal Agreement to reflect their desire to have Waste Industries provide weekly recycling services for the months of June – September and biweekly pick-up the remainder of the year; and

WHEREAS, the Holden Beach Fee Schedule needs to be updated to reflect the change in service.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach, North Carolina does hereby amend the fee schedule to reflect the new recycling fee of $67.56 per bin.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLIVED, that this fee should be effective for recycling services beginning on January 1, 2019.

Current Administration Fee for biweekly Curbside Recycling is $54 annually

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Approved a weekly recycling program during the summer rental season.
Changed current  Curbside Recycling fee from $54.00 annually per cart to $67.56

Moved funds of $9,883
From Revenue account #10.0355.0500 to Expense account#10.0580.4501

 

Recycling Policy
<400 households participate in the voluntary program. This is the only service that charges a user fee. To add insult to injury the Town assesses a $6.00 service charge to process just one check annually.

So why the 10% Vig?

 


15. First Draft of Revisions to Town of Holden Beach Code of Ordinances, Chapter 50: Solid Waste – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Agenda Packet –
The Board agreed at their August meeting to update the Town’s Code of Ordinances, Section 50: Solid Waste. Attached is the first version of a draft revised ordinance, prepared by Commissioner Kwiatkowski. The Board and residents have the opportunity to comment on the draft at the October meeting or can send emails to me at heather@hbtownhall.com with their suggestions. Once feedback is reviewed and any changes are incorporated, another draft will be prepared for the Board’s consideration.

Current Ordinance:
§50.02 CONTAINER SPECIFICATIONS.
   (A)   Residential requirements.
(1)   Garbage will be kept only in contractor-owned and provided standard, 90-gallon capacity roll-out containers.  Each residence is authorized one container; however, additional containers are available from the town for a set monthly fee.
(2)   Property owners are responsible to assure they have sufficient 90-gallon containers to properly contain refuse prior to collection.  Garbage placed on top of or beside the container(s) will not be placed in non-standard containers.

Proposed Ordinance:
§50.02 CONTAINER SPECIFICATIONS.
   (A)   Residential requirements.
     (1)   Garbage will be kept only in contractor-owned and provided standard, 90-gallon capacity roll-out containers.  Each residence is authorized one container; however, additional containers are available from the town for a set monthly fee.
     (2)   Short term rentals, particularly those that are rented as part of the summer rental season, are subject to high numbers of guests resulting in abnormally large volumes of garbage and refuse. This type of occupancy presents a significantly higher impact than homes not used for short term rentals. In interest of public health and sanitation and environmental concerns, all short-term rentals shall have a minimum of one garbage can per two bedrooms. Homes with an odd number of bedrooms shall round up 9for example one to two bedrooms – one trash can; three to four bedrooms – two trash cans; five to six bedrooms – three trash cans; and the like). For purposes of this section, a bedroom is any room which provides a facility for sleeping, including but not limited to, day beds (or other convertibles), sleeper sofas, hide-a-beds, cots or roll away beds.
     (3)   Property owners are responsible to assure they have sufficient 90-gallon garbage containers to properly contain refuse prior to collection.  Garbage or refuse placed on top of or beside the container(s) will not be picked up by waste collection and will be considered a littering offense as outlined in (_?).
       (a) Recyclable refuse can be disposed of in standard garbage containers. Alternatively, 90-gallon capacity containers for recyclable materials only are available by contract through the town for a set annual fee. They will be provided to a property in addition to, not in replacement of, the required number of garbage containers.

Current Ordinance:
§50.04 ACCUMULATION AND COLLECTION.
   (A)   All garbage and household refuse shall be kept in proper containers as required by this chapter and it shall be unlawful for any person to permit garbage to accumulate or remain on any premises longer than is reasonably necessary for its removal. Containers will be located at curbside by the property owner or their representative on designated collection days, and then should be returned to the normal house-side storage location by 6:00 p.m. the day after collection. See subsection (B) for an alternative storage location.
   (B)   It is the intent of the town that all 90-gallon containers be secured in such a manner either next to non-elevated or underneath elevated houses, except on collection days when they are to be placed at curbside, so that the town street right-of-way remains clear of empty containers, and so that containers are not damaged or overturned by high winds or other occurrences.  For those property owners who cannot make arrangements to have their container placed at or removed from curbside, an alternate non-collection day storage arrangement is as follows: A sturdy, wooden three-sided rack of sufficient size to just hold the required container(s) may be constructed by the owner. The rack must be constructed so the opening allows for the easy removal of the 90-gallon container(s) by the collector on collection days; e.g. the container must roll in and roll out of the rack without having to be lifted. The racks shall not be placed more than five feet from the street right-of-way and shall not be placed within the area of the street right-of-way. The rack shall be maintained in a sound and presentable condition. Container(s), on corner lots, will be located so as not to violate §§ 157.060(D)(9) and 157.061(D)(8), Corner Visibility, of the Town Code of Ordinances.
   (E)   Property owners who are consistently found incapable of properly securing their garbage containers as prescribed above, may receive written notice from the town that they are in violation of town ordinance in that regard.  Those so affected will be asked to correct the situation, so they come into compliance with the code or receive a civil fine of $50 per day per offense.

Proposed Ordinance:
§50.04 ACCUMULATION AND COLLECTION.
   (A)   All garbage and household refuse shall be kept in proper containers as required by this chapter and it shall be unlawful for any person to permit garbage to accumulate or remain on any premises longer than is reasonably necessary for its removal. During the summer rental season (defined for these purposes as the period of time that the garbage collection occurs twice weekly, being mid-May through September).  Containers will be located at curbside by the property owner or their representative no earlier than 6pm the evening before designated collection days, and then must be returned to the normal house-side or under house storage location by 6:00 p.m. the day of collection. For the rest of the year, containers will be located at curbside no more than 48 hours before designated collection and then must be returned to the normal storage location by 6:00pm the day after collection.
   (B)   It is the intent of the town that all 90-gallon containers be secured in such a manner either next to non-elevated or underneath elevated houses, except on collection days when they are to be placed at curbside, so that the town street right-of-way remains clear of empty containers, and so that containers are not damaged or overturned by high winds or other occurrences.
(E)   Property owners who are consistently found incapable of properly securing their garbage containers as prescribed in Parts (A) and (B) above, shall after no more than 3 violations receive written notice from the town that they are in violation of town ordinance in that regard.  Those so affected will be asked to correct the situation, so they come into compliance with the code or receive a civil fine of $50 per day per offense.

Current Ordinance:
§50.08 RENTAL HOMES.
   (A)   Rental homes, as defined in Chapter 157, that are rented as part of the summer rental season, are subject to high numbers of guests, resulting in abnormally large volumes of trash. This type of occupancy use presents a significantly higher impact than homes not used for summer rentals. In interest of public health and sanitation and environmental concerns, all rental home shall have a minimum of one trash can per two bedrooms. Homes with an odd number of bedrooms shall round up (for examples one to two bedrooms – one trash can; three to four bedrooms – two trash cans; five – six bedrooms – three trash cans, and the like).
   (B)   The effective date for all properties referenced in division (A) above shall be March 1, 2008.
(C)   Any property found in violation of division (A) above shall be subject to the penalties listed in § 50.99.

Proposed Ordinance:
§50.08 RENTAL HOMES.
   (A)  Short-term rental homes, are subject to high numbers of guests, resulting in abnormally large volumes of trash. Therefore, all rental home shall have a minimum of one trash can per two bedrooms. Homes with an odd number of bedrooms shall round up (for examples one to two bedrooms – one trash can; three to four bedrooms – two trash cans; five – six bedrooms – three trash cans, and the like).
   (B)   The effective date for all properties referenced in division (A) above shall be March 1, 2019.
(C)   Any property found in violation of division (A) above shall be subject to civil fine of $50 per week per offense.

Current Ordinance:
§50.99 PENALTY.
(A)   Criminal. Any person who violates any provision of this chapter, shall be subject to the penalty provided in § 10.99(A) of this code of ordinances.
(B)   Civil. In accordance with § 10.99(B) of this code of ordinances, the civil fine for violation of any provision of this chapter, with the exception of § 50.04, shall be $25 per offense.

Proposed Ordinance:
§50.99 PENALTY.
   (A)   Criminal. Any person who violates any provision of this chapter, with the exception of § 50.04, for which no penalty is otherwise provided shall be subject to the penalty provided in § 10.99(A) of this code of ordinances.
   (B)   Civil. In accordance with § 10.99(B) of this code of ordinances, the civil fine for violation of any provision of this chapter, shall be $50 per offense.


Let me begin by saying I applaud the effort Patty has put in to try to address this issue. The garbage in the streets isn’t just unsightly, it poses a serious threat to nature. It’s a Quality of Life issue and can cause loss to our tourism industry. Off the top of my head here are a few questions that need to be addressed before adopting the Ordinance, keep in mind these are just a few of the proposed changes.

§50.02 CONTAINER SPECIFICATIONS.

Who will do audit to check for compliance that property has correct number of garbage containers?

Who and how will we determine the number of bedrooms?
. *
A significant number of rental properties offer additional sleeping accommodation options

Are we broadening the definition beyond bedrooms to include sleeping areas?
. * A
reas include all rooms except kitchens, hallways, mechanical rooms, bathrooms and small closets

Will you be fined if refuse placed on top or beside container if you have the correct number of containers?

What happens to the refuse not placed in container that will not be picked up?

 §50.04 ACCUMULATION AND COLLECTION.

Who is going to be monitoring this?

Will someone be policing this before 6pm the day before collection days and after 6pm on collection days?

  • If your property is not on OBW you don’t get the free rollback service and now you can be fined too and that ain’t right!

What type of documentation will we create to keep track of infractions?

Will we offer some type of roll out and back service with a user fee?

What does the normal storage location mean?

What does written notice after no more than 3 violations even mean?

  • Is it discretionary so a notice and fine can be issued after even one violation?
  • Is it after three violations we are sending written notice and then we will issue fine

§50.08 RENTAL HOMES.

Who will do audit to check for compliance that property has correct number of garbage containers?

Who and how will we determine the number of bedrooms?

Once we identify violation and impose weekly fine –

  • Will we monitor until in compliance
  • Will the owner need to contact the Town once they comply?
  • Will we require any documentation that they comply?

§50.99 PENALTY.

The civil fine for violation of any provision of this chapter, shall be $50 per offense.

  • Non-compliance with required number of pails
  • Put pails at curbside too early
  • Don’t retrieve pails timely
  • Refuse placed on top or beside container
  • Containers not placed in normal storage location

Will we issue fines for each separate violation?

Who and how do we collect these fines?

Is there an appeal process?

Agree that we have a number of issues that need to be addressed. Unfortunately, I don’t think that there are any simple solutions. A number of the proposed changes create a whole series of unintended consequences. Really feel we need to work through this with a series of workshops that include all stakeholders. The self-imposed deadline to complete project before rental companies do their brochures is simply not going to happen. In order to avoid the brouhaha that we just had with the System Development Fees the public needs to actively participate in the process.  The Board is asking that all stakeholders review the information and give constructive input. Any changes are bound to have ramifications; you need to know what that means to you. This ordinance if adopted as written is going to have significant negative repercussions for many property owners. In order to be familiar with all of the proposed changes I strongly recommend that you read pages 70 through 74 in the Agenda Packet.


16. Status of the Internal Control Audit – Town Manager Hewett
(Commissioner Freer)

Previously reported – February 2018
Finding: 17-1 / SIGNIFICANT DEFICIENCY
Inadequate Design of Internal Controls over the Preparation of the Financial Statements
Finding: 17-2 / SIGNIFICANT DEFICIENCY
Prior Period Adjustment ($479,789)

Previously reported – April 2018
Direct Solicitation to Conduct Comprehensive Financial and Accounting Internal Control Review
Agenda Packet –
The Audit Report with respect to the Town’s Annual Financial Statements for the year ended June 30, 2017 raised two “significant deficiencies” with respect to the Town’s financial controls and procedures for financial statement preparation. The Audit Report also concluded that any financial reports provided to the Commissioners cannot be relied on, as the ledger does not reflect adjustments made in previous years. The Audit Committee has had preliminary discussions with the Auditor about these matters and the audit process, and as part of that discussion the Auditor recommended that the Town engage a consultant to perform a comprehensive review of its internal financial controls. The Audit report approved and signed by the Town’s Finance Director included a corrective response stating, “The Town of Holden Beach’s governing body feels that there are limited financial resources at this time for training the finance department staff in GAAP and that it is not cost beneficial to obtain additional assistance in this area.” This statement was false. Accordingly, I move that:

The Audit Committee is authorized and directed to review, investigate, report and make recommendations to the BOC on
(i)            the Town’s accounting and financial control systems including “significant deficiencies” related to internal controls;
(ii)           appropriate training of financial and accounting staff;
(iii)          policies and procedures relating to financial statement preparation, preventive and detective internal controls, and the audit process, including engaging such consultants to perform such internal controls review as the Audit Committee deems necessary or appropriate.

Handout –
Statement of Work
“The Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach, via their Audit Committee, is soliciting proposals to perform a review of the Town’s internal controls.

The scope of this work will include a review and assessment of current practices in the operations of the finance department, including the preparation of financial statements that are compliant with generally accepted accounting principles, and the development of financial reports provided to the Board of Commissioners.  In addition, the work should include a focus on the controls designed to prevent or detect misappropriations, embezzlement, and any other potentially fraudulent activities.

The deliverables from the work should include an assessment of the effectiveness of existing controls as well as their implementation, recommended changes to work practices, policies and procedures to ensure accurate financial reporting, and to prevent certain events from occurring, as well as backup procedures to ensure the proposed internal controls function as intended.

The work should comply with the Local Government Budget and Fiscal Control Act and align with the principles in the COSO Internal Control Integrated Framework. ”

Previously reported – June 2018
Discussion and Possible Action on the Audit Committee Recommendation of the Firm to Conduct an Internal Control Evaluation
The Audit Committee selected the firm RSM for the internal control Review
The recommendation is to obtain firm with a not to exceed price of $20,000
Scope of work subject to approval from The NC Local Government Commission

Update –
RSM has completed the field work and has submitted a skeleton draft. Anticipate having a final draft next month, will make presentation to the Board at that time.

16A. Notice of Audit Committee’s Intent to Draft Updated Charter and Bylaws for Consideration by the BOC – Commissioner Fletcher

Previously reported – July 2018
Commissioner Fletcher felt there was a gap between the Board’s intention and what has actually come to pass based on the Town’s staff interpretation. John as Chair of the Audit Committee requested that the Board clarify what functions they wanted the Audit Committee to perform. The Board advised him that the Audit Committee must adopt their bylaws and then bring it back to the Board for discussion and approval.

Previously reported – August 2018
Commissioner Fletcher submitted the bylaws that the Audit Committee unanimously approved. Noel Fox the Town Attorney took issue with several items. They will have to submit an amended / revised version for approval again. Who knew this could be so complicated? The Board did manage to authorize the Audit Committee to schedule a meeting with the firm conducting the internal control review. The Board does not want to wait for a final report and requested an interim status update as soon as it can be made available.

Update –
Not on the agenda
This was on the agenda in July, August and September. They anticipate having document that has been approved by the Town Attorney and the Audit Committee for the BOC’s Regular Meeting in November.


17. Recognition of 2018 Pelican Award from the North Carolina Coastal Federation to the Town of Holden Beach Board of Commissioners for Outstanding Leadership and Dedication to Keep Our Coast Accessible and Public – Commissioner Butler and Commissioner Freer

Previously reported –August 2018
Pelican Award

Town of Holden Beach, Dunescape Property Owners’ Association and the Holden Beach Property Owners Association For Outstanding Leadership and Dedication to Keep Our Coast Accessible and Public

Flanked by the beautiful Lockwoods Folly Inlet, the eastern end of Holden Beach was threatened to be forever changed by an unnecessary and expensive engineered structure. But on April 17, 2018, the Holden Beach Board of Commissioners unanimously voted to permanently revoke the town’s permit application for a terminal groin with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This historic move would not have been possible without the diligent evaluation of potential impacts by dedicated residents of the Dunescape Property Owners’ Association and the Holden Beach Property Owners Association — Rhonda and Tom Dixon, Tom and Vicki Myers, Jay and Denise Holden, John and Margaret Witten, Rich Weigand, Lou Cutajar and Skip Klapheke. These and other Holden Beach residents tirelessly fought to bring to light the detrimental effects the terminal groin — a rock, concrete, stone or metal structure built at an inlet, perpendicular to the coast — would have had on the island’s natural habitat and shoreline. Their forethought and action also positioned the town to save a lot of money for a project that likely would not work. The residents of Holden Beach persevered in their opposition and are true pioneers in showing how to exercise sound coastal management decision- making and recognizing that expensive hardened structures along our beaches are not the answer to erosion.

Holden Beach, associations honored with Pelican Award
Six years ago, Holden Beach considered constructing a terminal groin. Town officials received input from Holden Beach Property Owners Association and the Dunescape Property Association to teach residents about the process and possible outcomes before commissioners ultimately voted not to pursue the project. On July 28, the North Carolina Coastal Federation honored the town and the two associations with its Pelican Award for “outstanding leadership and dedication to keep the North Carolina coast accessible and public.”
Read more » click here

A Look Back: Holden Beach’s (Un)Done Deal
A terminal groin at the east end of Holden Beach was a given.
Read more »
click here

Well this is embarrassing, Peter neglected to bring the plaque to the meeting

Update –
Somewhat anticlimactic, Peter displayed the award and passed around the article


18. Discussion of Possible Ramifications of State Funded Dare Dredge and Action Plan for the Town to Begin the Process of Getting Service – Commissioner Kwiatkowski
Agenda Packet –

Dare Moving Ahead on Inlet Dredge Plan
As the need for dredging in North Carolina waterways has long ago surpassed the availability of funds and equipment to dredge, Dare County, with the help of $15 million provided in the recent state budget, is about to try something different: Build a dedicated dredge to maintain its waterways. The plan would be a private-public partnership where a forgivable loan would be offered to the owner/operator in exchange for discounts on the dredging work. The ocean-certified dredge would mostly be used to maintain Oregon Inlet – a notoriously high-need waterway – and Hatteras Inlet in Dare County.

A provision in North Carolina Senate Bill 99, added by state Sen. Bill Cook, R-Beaufort, appropriated the $15 million from the state Shallow Draft Navigation Channel Dredging and Aquatic Weed Fund for Dare to contract with a private developer to design build, operate, maintain and own an ocean-certified hopper dredge. The contractor would have 10 years, with a possible five-year extension, to pay off the loan with credits earned by providing discounted rates for dredging Dare County waterways. Language in the legislation cited the decline in federal funds for decreased maintenance by the Army Corps of Engineers.

The proposed hopper dredge, estimated to cost $25 million to $30 million and take about two years to build, would service Oregon Inlet, Hatteras Inlet and their surrounding waterways, and when possible, other waterways and shallow-draft inlets in North Carolina. Hopper dredges hold the dredged material, or spoils, and then deposit it at specific locations. They are capable of withstanding ocean conditions.

The state defines shallow-draft navigation channels as inlets with a maximum depth of 16 feet, a river entrance to the Atlantic or other interior coastal waterways, including: the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway and its side channels, Beaufort Harbor, Bogue Inlet, Carolina Beach Inlet, Back Sound to Lookout Back channel, Lockwood Folly River, Oregon Inlet/Shallowbag Bay, Masonboro Inlet, New River, New Topsail Inlet, Rodanthe Harbor, Hatteras Inlet, Shallotte River, Silver Lake Harbor and the connecting waterway between Pamlico Sound and Beaufort Harbor.
Read more » click here

Patty felt that the article does not jive with language in the legislation. She appears to be in the minority here. Pretty much everyone else seems to think that is highly unlikely that we will ever see the hopper dredge here. To her credit, she would like to get some answers as to how exactly this will work. David recommended she should start by asking Representative Frank Iler at the Beach Consortium meeting they were all going to on Wednesday.


19. Recognition of Assistant Town Manager Ferguson for Earning Certified Park & Recreation Executive Status – Town Manager Hewett 

The Certified Park and Recreation Executive (CPRE) establishes a national standard for managerial, administrative and executive parks and recreation professionals. This mastery-level credential focuses on the practical knowledge and current real-world skills necessary in today’s changing park and recreation environment.
For more information » click here

David presented the award to Christy for obtaining national certification followed by a photo-op. Apparently Christy joins an elite group. She is one of only fourteen in North Carolina and one of two hundred and fifty-one in the entire nation. Kudos!


 20. Town Manager’s Report

Veteran’s Appreciation Luncheon is on Friday, November 9th in the Town Hall. The event is free. Pre-registration by November 2nd is required.

 The Inlet and Beach Protection Board orientations are complete

Canal Dredging Project
Previously reported – December 2017
Adoption Resolution 17-10, Water Resources Development Grant ($1,439,922)
The grant is good for two years and will accelerate our current dredging schedule. Each canal will be responsible for paying for their dredging project costs upfront. It is a reimbursement grant which means we do not receive the funds from the state until after satisfactory completion of the project.

Previously reported – June 2018
The Town is planning to perform a complete dredge of all of the canals this coming fall/winter (November 2018 – Mar 2019). We have been apprised of recent changes regarding the obtainment of consent agreements for USACE dredge spoil areas. Those changes will result in closer scrutiny of remaining capacity in existing sites; hence longer/unknown lead times and quite possibly denial of permission to place material from this fall’s canal maintenance dredging in the Corps disposal sites. The Town has been preparing the area adjacent to the dog park as an alternate site if unable to use the USACE dredge spoil areas. David reminded us that this is a big undertaking with lots of moving parts and will require considerable time and effort from the Town staff to pull it off without a hitch.

Water Bill
The Town is planning to perform a complete dredge of all of the canals this coming fall/winter (November 2018 – Mar 2019). It is recommended that property owners begin getting ready for the canal dredging as early as possible by first assessing the condition of their bulkheads so that repairs on those structures can be made in plenty of time before dredging begins. This will not only provide for the best dredging effort, but also lesson the possibility of leaky bulkheads filling canals back in prematurely after dredge completion. The Town will also be conducting its annual inspection of the bulkheads. Likewise, it is also recommended that property owners begin to coordinate the actions needed to move your floating docks in anticipation of the actual dredge arrival in order to facilitate a better excavation near their pilings. Finally, boat movements should also be considered. You may want to begin planning for winter accommodations and repairs to your boat now. Remember that boat dry docks book up fast.

Previously reported – August 2018
Town had meeting with potential bidders for the canal dredging project
He anticipates bid letting date sometime in September
Dredging is scheduled to start in the middle of November

The Town has been preparing the area adjacent to the dog park off Scotch Bonnet.
It will be necessary to close the dog park this winter once dredging project begins.
The dog park will probably have to be closed until Memorial Day in 2019.

Previously reported – October 2018
Construction at the Scotch Bonnet dredge spoil area began this week in preparation for this winter’s canal dredging project. We ask that canal property owners begin to move their boats and docks if possible in preparation for the dredge event. The tentative schedule will begin with Holden Beach Harbor mid-November, followed by Heritage Harbor mid-January, and Harbor Acres mid-February. 

Note: This schedule may be affected by inclement weather. 

Update –
King Dredging is partially mobilized on site and is prepping containment area by dog park. Dredging scheduled to commence in the middle of November working the canals from east to west.

50 Year Project
Previously reported –
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is the primary federal entity and partner in numerous programs and projects designed to help protect the economy and the environment of our nation’s coastal areas by reducing the effects of storms, erosion and flooding. The federal interest in and responsibility for beach restoration projects was clarified when. Congress enacted the Shore Protection Act of 1996. It is often referred to as the “50year project” because the nourishment effort includes initial construction and subsequent periodic maintenance for 50 years.

Beach nourishment is the practice of adding sand to a beach to maintain a sandy shoreline. The sand-funding partnerships are typically called “50 Year Projects” to reflect their authorized duration. Under current law, the cost share for beach nourishment projects is 65 percent federal and 35 percent non-federal for the initial nourishment and 50 percent federal and 50 percent non-federal for ongoing renourishment over the next 50 years. Beach towns, up and down the coasts with these partnerships could find themselves in funding trouble when the time comes due to a large shift in burden on how the town’s routine beach nourishment projects are paid for.

Update –
Inactive since 2013
No additional federal funds are currently available
Balls in our court if interest still exists

Pointe West  Storm Water Project
Storm water project has been completed there
Tested during storm events, it appears to be doing what it is supposed to do

Annual Audit
Storm events delayed the process
Field work by external auditor won’t be till mid-November
Auditor had advised the Local Government Commission

Storm Events
Three FEMA hurricane damage reimbursement programs being worked simultaneously
.   1)
Matthew $350,000
  2)
Florence @$8,000,000
.   3)
Michael @$???
    *
Haven’t received a preliminary cost assessment from our consulting engineer yet

Hurricane Florence 275,000 cubic yards of sand lost with 201,000 cubic yards of that in the Central Reach Project area

Hurricane Michael 136,000 cubic yards of sand lost with 90,000 cubic yards of that in the Central Reach Project area

Engineered Beach
Holden Beach designation as an engineered beach means if there is a named storm event then we qualify for Category G FEMA reimbursements for replacing all the material that were lost during that event.

Good News – we have an engineered beach in the Central Reach Project (CRP) area
Bad News – the rest of the beach strand is not part of the engineered beach

What that means to us –
We are only eligible for reimbursement for the sand lost in the CRP area

Mosquito Control
County has completed aerial spraying while the Town continues with local spraying program. Cold weather will help but they will continue to monitor and evaluate the situation

Sewer Capacity
Holden Beach for the last three (3) years sells unused sewer capacity to Southport
We received a reimbursement check for $57,000

Bridge
Contract was awarded
Rehabilitation slated to start at the end of the month
Pre-construction meeting has been scheduled


21. Board of Commissioners’ Comments

The entire Board expressed gratitude for the exceptional job done by Mayor Holden in keeping the community informed about what was happening on the island during the evacuation. Kudos!  


General Comments –

The Mayor and the Board of Commissioners’ all thanked the staff for a job well done during the storm event

There were thirty (30) members of the community in attendance


Meeting Agenda
Twenty-nine (29) agenda items – Really?!

Don’t see how you can possibly focus on some of these important issues when you have a loaded agenda like this

Some important and urgent, some not so much

Not included –
  1) Hurricane Florence After Action Report
  2)
Hurricane Michael After Action Report

No support information in Agenda Packet –
.   1) Poyner Spruill Presentation Concerning Consulting Services
.   2)
Federal Litigation Between National Audubon Society and Ocean Isle Beach
.   3)
Vacuum Sewer System #4 Upgrade Status Report
  4)
Status of the Internal Control Audit
.   5)
Determination of Maximum Sewer and Water System Development Fees

Included but could have been scheduled at a later date –
.      * Important but not urgent
.   1)
Brunswick Avenue Paving Options
.   2)
Second Water Tower
  3)
Vacuum Sewer System #4 Upgrade Status Report
.   4)
Parking Action Steps
  5)
Recognition of 2018 Pelican Award
.   6)
State Funded Dare Dredge
.   7)
Recognition Certified Park & Recreation Executive Status

I’m just saying, this could have been made much more manageable
Marathon session, the meeting ran for over three and a half (3.5) hours
So less than half the people were still there at the meetings conclusion


General Election 2018Tuesday, November 6t
.   1) Encourage everyone to vote
.   2)
Remember it’s a right and a privilege to be able to do so
.   3) 
Polling place relocation to Caison’s Creek Clubhouse

For more information visit The North Carolina State Board of Elections web site
Read more » click here              

Be a Voter – Your Vote Matters!


 

HBPOIN / Lou’s Views

Newsletter Celebrating Ten Year Anniversary!


The BOC’s November Regular Meeting is scheduled on the third Tuesday of the month, November 20th

Town Manager’s Review
The Town Managers performance review was supposed to be done on the anniversary date of his hire which is in February. Once again it was not done in a timely manner.

Do you enjoy this newsletter? Then please forward it to a friend!


Hurricane Season –

Hurricane #1 - CR

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) defines a hurricane as “an intense tropical weather system with a well-defined circulation and maximum sustained winds of 74 mph (64 knots) or higher.”

Be prepared – have a plan!

For assistance with making an emergency plan read more here »
. 1) FEMA Ready
. 2) American Red Cross Disaster and Safety Library
. 3) ReadyNC
. 4) Town Emergency Information
. 5) HBPOIN Hurricane Emergency Plan

THB – EVACUATION, CURFEW & VEHICLE DECALS
For more information » click here

If the Town declares a mandatory evacuation, PLEASE LEAVE
General Assembly during the 2012 Session, specifically authorizes both voluntary and mandatory evacuations, and increases the penalty for violating any local emergency restriction or prohibition from a Class 3 to a Class 2 misdemeanor. Given the broad authority granted to the governor and city and county officials under the North Carolina Emergency Management Act (G.S. Chapter 166A) to take measures necessary to protect public health, safety, and welfare during a disaster, it is reasonable to interpret the authority to “direct and compel” evacuations to mean ordering “mandatory” evacuations. Those who choose to not comply with official warnings to get out of harm’s way, or are unable to, should prepare themselves to be fully self-sufficient for the first 72 hours after the storm.

No matter what a storm outlook is for a given year,

vigilance and preparedness is urged.


Hurricane Michael was the most intense hurricane to strike the United States since Andrew in 1992. Michael was the third-most intense hurricane to make landfall on the United States, behind the 1935 Labor Day hurricane and Hurricane Camille of 1969; the strongest hurricane to ever make landfall in the Florida Panhandle; as well as the fourth-strongest landfalling hurricane in the United States mainland by wind speed. The thirteenth named storm, seventh hurricane, and second major hurricane of the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season, Michael originated from a broad low-pressure area in the western Caribbean Sea. The disturbance became a tropical depression on October 7, after nearly a week of slow development. By the next day, Michael had intensified into a hurricane near the western tip of Cuba as it moved northward. Strengthening continued in the Gulf of Mexico, first to a major hurricane on October 9, and further to a Category 4 hurricane on the Saffir–Simpson scale. Approaching the Florida Panhandle, Michael attained peak winds of 155 mph (250 km/h) as it made landfall near Mexico Beach, Florida, on October 10, becoming the first to do so in the region as a Category 4 hurricane, and also the strongest storm of the season. As it moved inland, the storm weakened and began to take a northeastward trajectory toward the Chesapeake Bay.
For more information » click here

Fortunately for us Hurricane Michael weakened to a Tropical Storm on October 11th and passed north of us. Damage from the storm was minimal and much less than predicted. Holden Beach dodged another bullet. All things considered, we fared exceptionally well. We all should be very thankful!

Region weathers Michael’s visit
Tropical storm brought heavy surf and gusty winds, but few problems
Tropical Storm Michael blew in Thursday to a Cape Fear region still recovering from Hurricane Florence and blew out without inflicting much more damage. Michael made landfall Wednesday afternoon as a Category 4 hurricane, causing catastrophic damage in Mexico Beach and other communities along the Florida Panhandle. The storm weakened to a tropical storm as it tracked north, with its center passing over Central and Northeastern North Carolina. Area beaches reported little to no additional damage along beach strands that sustained erosion during Florence. Michael’s strongest winds in the region included 58 mph in Kure Beach and 54 mph in Oak Island, according to the NWS. Wilmington saw maximum gusts of 53 mph.

Holden Beach in Brunswick County also sustained minimal damage from Michael’s tides and winds, Mayor Alan Holden said. Holden toured the beach strand about 2 p.m. and said some boardwalks had been washed out on the west end, but the beach had otherwise weathered the storm. “It looks like it’s in good shape,” he said of the beach strand. “We probably lost a little bit of sand, but it’s too early to tell how much.”
Read more » click here

Hurricane Florence
After Action Report – not given

Hurricane Michael
After Action Report – not given

In the past the Town did a self-assessment of its emergency actions and responses before, during and after the storm event. Public input was considered a valued component of efforts to evaluate the Towns performance and they asked us: How did we do? Apparently, that is no longer the case.


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