01 – Town Meeting

Lou’s Views

“Unofficial” Minutes & Comments


BOC’s Special Meeting 01/15/19

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet
For more information
» click here

1. Interviews for the Audit Committee

Two new applicants Woody Tyner and Anthony Chavonne


BOC’s Special Meeting 01/16/19

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet
For more information
» click here

1. Discussion and Possible Action on Setting 2019 Board of Commissioners’ Objectives with Town Management


BOC’s Regular Meeting 01/15/19

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet
For more information
» click here


1. Public Comments on Agenda Items

There were no comments


2. Receipt of Inlet and Beach Protection Board Report – Commissioner Freer

Agenda Packet –
December Meeting Update
The Inlet and Beach Protection Board {IBPB) met December 20 and the following issues and topics were addressed:

Status of the Beach and Inlets:  Staff provided an overview of conditions and issues relative to the beach strand and inlets. The Board was updated on the LFI situation.

Collaboration with UNCW: Member Thomas gave an update on his meeting with UNCW. The next step is to have a representative from UNCW attend a meeting of the IBPB.

Comprehensive long-Term Plan: A working framework for the long-term plan was discussed and agreed upon.  Sample reports were reviewed and discussed. A facilitator was also discussed, and that recommendation will be forwarded on.

Budget Items for FY 19-20: As “budget season” is fast approaching, Board Members discussed projects and items they would like to see included in the upcoming budget. Identified items such as additional plantings and mats will be researched as possible recommendations for the budget.

Engagement with other Groups: The Town of Holden Beach and the IBPB interface with many groups and projects/efforts. In order to increase awareness and efficiency, members volunteered to take responsibility for keeping the rest of the group updated.

Community Engagement Newsletter: To meet the goal of serving as a link to the community as specified in the establishing ordinance, the first draft of a regular (possibly quarterly) community newsletter was reviewed and will be distributed.

Meetings: Members of the Board, staff, and the BOC attended the quarterly MOA meeting in New Bern on December 19 in person and via webinar. Upcoming beach and inlet related meetings were discussed.

Vegetation: Steve Mercer will be scheduled to attend an IBPB meeting and a field trip to his nursery will be scheduled in the spring.

Previously reported –
Ordinance 18-02 established the Inlet and Beach Protection Board
The Ordinance requires a written report from this Board

Update –
No issues, accepted report


3. Police Report – Detective Jeremy Dixon

Police Patch
So far so good, it’s been fairly quiet
We are not experiencing any major crime wave at the moment

 

Personnel Announcements
Chief Layne has officially announced his retirement effective 1 April 2019
Detective Dixon is formally designated “Chief in Waiting”
Officer Colten Robinson has joined the Police Department


Reminder that we all serve as the eyes and ears for law enforcement.
If you know something, hear something, or see something –
call 911 and let police deal with it.


Neighborhood Watch

  • Need to look out for each other and report any suspicious activity
  • Call 911 if you see or hear anything suspicious
  • Fill out Keep Check Request Form if you will be out of town
  • Submit completed Property Registration Form
  • Pickup copy of Protecting Your Home

Crime prevention 101 – Don’t make it easy for them
. a) Don’t leave vehicles unlocked
. b)
Don’t leave valuables in your vehicles
. c)
Lock your doors & windows – house, garage, storage areas and sheds

Keep Check Request Form
. a) Complete the form and return it to the Police Department
. b)
Officers check your property in your absence

Property Registration Form
. a) Record of items in your home that have a value of over $100
. b)
Complete the form and return it to the Police Department


4. Discussion and Possible Action – Construction Management Services of the Vacuum Sewer System #4 Upgrade Status Report – Public Works Director Clemmons

Previously reported – December 2017
McGill and Associates were commissioned to perform a Sewer Study to evaluate sewer system vulnerability reducing measures. A fiscal year 2017-2018 budget appropriation of $1,413,000 was made to accommodate total programmatic expenses of Lift Station #4 improvements. Green Engineering firm was awarded the $158,000 contract for Sewer System #4 upgrade. Green Engineering will provide all engineering services required to construct a vulnerability reducing structure of Lift Station #4.

Previously reported –
April 2018
Four (4) meetings have been held between staff and the engineering firm to date. The final plans were delivered to the Town and have been reviewed and approved by the Building Inspector. Deliverables – Timeline has been revised. Buildings were designed in the same style as Town Hall. We are currently on schedule, but Chris cautioned that it was still early in the game. The Board requested monthly updates, reporting on whether we remained on schedule and within budget.

Previously reported –
May 2018
We’ve had a slight setback, we did not receive the three (3) bids required to move forward. Officially we accepted no bids, the two bids submitted will be held and opened upon the completion of the second go round. Chris was a little surprised and disappointed since their appeared to be a lot of interest when they held meeting with vendors. We will need to start the bid process over. The protocols on the second bid process do not require the three bids but the caveat is we can only consider quality bids.

Previously reported –
June 2018
BOC’s SPECIAL MEETING / May 23, 2018
Approved award of the Lift Station #4 upgrade contract to T.A. Loving Company in the amount of $1,205,000

Total project cost went from $1,413,000 to $1,695,700 or a $282,700 difference
Contingency funds were reduced from $157,400 to $52,480 or a $104,920 difference
Bottomline, the project cost just went up $387,620 ($282,700 + $104,920) or @27% (Yikes!)

A pre-construction meeting is scheduled for June 28th
We should have a tentative construction start date then

Previously reported –
July 2018
A pre-construction meeting was held on June 28th
The contractor was given notice to proceed
Mobilization is scheduled for the first week of August
Concerns:
. 1) Time to get materials – delay waiting for foundation steel
. 2)
Storm Season

Previously reported –
August 2018
Reviewed progress to date, despite the rain they are still on schedule, gave some tentative project timelines. It’s all good!

Previously reported –
October 2018
Making good progress, despite the two storm events they are still on track to complete project on schedule.

Previously reported – November 2018
Town hired Green Engineering for construction management services. Leo Green gave a brief status report. It’s all good, we are still on budget and on schedule. Project tentative completion date is the middle of January well before the tourist season begins. Leo meets with the town staff monthly to discuss any issues and keep everyone informed about the status of the project. Building Inspections Director Evans gave them two thumbs up for the work that has been done so far; really high praise coming from Timbo.

Previously reported – December 2018
Tentative startup date is now January 15th, station will be fully operational after that date. Expectation is that they should have everything wrapped up by March of 2019.

Update –
They are making progress daily and are attempting to tie up any loose ends. Airvac is scheduled to be on site this week in order to initiate the integration and changeover of the upgraded sewer lift station machinery and equipment.


5. Discussion and Possible Nomination of a Board of Commissioners Member to Serve as the Audit Committee Chair – Town Clerk Finnell

Previously reported – January 2018
The Board of Commissioners has found that establishment of an Audit Committee would improve the ability of the Board of Commissioners to perform its fiscal oversight function.

 §30.26 AUDIT COMMITTEE OF THE BOC
There is hereby established an Audit Committee of the BOC, which shall be comprised of: A Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee, who shall be a member of the Board of Commissioners; and not fewer than two nor more than four Public Members, as determined by the BOC at the first regular meeting in January. The Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee and each of the Public Members shall have a normal term of one year, and all shall serve at the pleasure of the BOC. The Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee shall be elected by the BOC at the first regular meeting in January.

Update –
John Fletcher was renominated to retain the Chair for another year.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


6. Discussion and Possible Nomination of Members to Serve on the Audit Committee – Town Clerk Finnell

Agenda Packet –
APPOINTMENT, TERMS
The Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee shall be elected by the BOC at the first regular meeting in January. The Chairman of the Audit Committee shall make a recommendation to the Board of Commissioners on who shall serve as the Public Members. The Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee, an elected Commissioner, and each of the Public Members shall have a normal term of one year and shall serve at the pleasure of the BOC.


Ron Skubic, Mark Fleischhauer and Tom Myers, current members of the Audit Committee, are willing to serve another term. I have included copies of their resumes in the Special Meeting Packet. Per existing practice, the members currently serving on a committee or board do not need to be interviewed again so I have not scheduled interviews for these members. The fourth current member, Ben Byrnside does not want to serve another term.

There are two new applicants for the Audit Committee, Woody Tyner and Anthony Chavonne. Both applicants are scheduled to be interviewed at the Special Meeting scheduled for 6:45p.m. on January 15, 2019.

Update –
Ron Skubic and Ben Byrnside both stepped down. That left four candidates to fill the four positions. Mark Fleischhauer and Tom Myers, current members of the Audit Committee, will be joined by the two new applicants Woody Tyner and Anthony Chavonne.  

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


7. Discussion and Possible Approval of Ordinance 19-01, An Ordinance Amending The Holden Beach Code of Ordinances Chapter 151: Building and Housing Regulations (Impact Fees) – Planning Director Evans

Agenda Packet –
Remove Sections 151.65, 151.66, 151.67, 151.68, 151.69, 151.71, 151.72, 151.73, 151.74, 151.75 and 151.99 from Chapter 151: Building and Housing Regulations.

 §151.65  APPLICATION OF PROVISIONS.
 §151.66  PERSONS RESPONSIBLE FOR FEES; EXCEPTIONS.
 §151.67  IMPOSITION.
 §151.68  SEWER AND STORMWATER DRAINAGE FUND.
 §151.69  IMPACT FEE SCHEDULE.
 §151.71  REFUNDS; APPEAL PROCEDURE.
 §151.72  EFFECT OF FEE ON ZONING AND SUBDIVISION REGULATIONS.
 §151.73  REVIEW OF FEE SCHEDULE AND FEE COLLECTION.
 §151.74  CREDITS.
 §151.75  LIBERAL CONSTRUCTION.
 §151.99  PENALTY.

Update –

GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF NORTH CAROLINA / SESSION LAW 2018-34
For more information » click here

According to Timbo session law 2018-34 prohibited us from charging impact fees. Since our ordinance no longer complies with the law it needs to be removed. Basically, he requested that they redact that section of our ordinances.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


8. Planning & Zoning Board Report on Requested Ordinance Change for Cargo Lifts – Vicki Myers, P&Z Chair 

Previously reported – July 2018
Agenda Packet –
Board of Adjustment Letter
Over the past few years, the BOA has been receiving requests, for variances, as it relates to “Cargo Lifts”. The requests are coming from older houses that already violate the 25′ setback but are still allowed to build outside staircases and HVAC platforms. Today, Larry Blume made a motion to ask the BOC to consider changing the ordinance to add Cargo Lifts in ordinance 157.060 (D)(C3) and 157.060 (E) (2) (b).

This change will allow the building inspector to handle these requests, via, the permitting process, thus saving the home owner the expense of applying for a variance.

Heather
The Board of Adjustment is requesting an amendment to the Town’s Code of Ordinances. They would like the Board to consider amending Section 157.060, Residential Districts to allow the building inspector to handle requests relating to cargo lifts via the permitting process.

If the Board would like to move forward with the Board of Adjustment’s request, staff will work with the Town Attorney to draft an ordinance for the Board’s consideration at an upcoming meeting.

Planning Director Evans explained that the current process creates an undue burden for the homeowner of both time and money. So far, every request submitted has been approved. The first step to make the requested change is to send it to the Planning & Zoning Board.

Agenda Packet – January
At the July meeting of the Board of Commissioners, the Planning and Zoning Board was directed to consider amending the Town’s Code of Ordinances, Section 157.060 to “allow the Building Inspector to handle requests relating to cargo lifts via the permitting process.”

After research by Town Staff and discussion, the P&Z Board voted to recommend leaving the ordinance as it is written.

•  Staff feels that there is no reason to change the ordinance

The P&Z Board feels that setbacks should be protected, and exceptions should only be made in cases of hardship where there are no other alternatives. This is the role of the Board of Adjustment and we feel they should continue to make these decisions on a case-by-case basis. By continuing this practice a precedent will not be set allowing encroachment into the setbacks, as each case is decided on an individual basis.

According to the Building Inspector’s records, only four cargo lift cases have gone to Board of Adjustment in the past nine years, or 5% of all permits for cargo lifts. We do not feel this is overly burdensome for Board of Adjustment.

In addition, the proposed change does not conform to the adopted CAMA Land Use Plan

Update –
Both the Planning and Zoning Board and the Town Staff recommended leaving the ordinance as it is written.

No decision was made – No action taken

Talk about mixed signals. In July the Planning and Inspections Director Evans submits request claiming that the current process creates an undue burden for the homeowner of both time and money. Now just six (6) months later he says that only four cargo lift cases have gone to Board of Adjustment in the past nine years, so that there is no reason to change the ordinance. The Town Staff recommended leaving the ordinance as it is written. So, which is it?  


9. Discussion and Possible Approval of Proclamation Recognizing the Town of Holden Beach’s 50th Anniversary of Incorporation – Assistant Town Manager Ferguson

Agenda Packet –
PROCLAMATION
CELEBRATING THE 50th ANNIVERSARY OF THE INCORPORATION OF THE TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach was first incorporated on February 14,1969 and 2019 marks the 50th anniversary with an array of special events planned; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach honors the hard work of its early residents and volunteers who loved their community and organized the incorporation effort; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach marks its 50th anniversary by celebrating its citizens, volunteers, elected officials and staff who strive to preserve and enhance the community; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach anticipates a future that continues to appreciate the beauty of its shoreline, the livability of the community, the appeals a tourist destination, the moniker of the “Family Beach”, and the active and involved citizens; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach dedicates 2019 as a year of community wide celebration to honor our past, celebrate our present and embrace our future.

NOW THEREFORE, the Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach, do hereby proclaim 2019 as a year of celebration of the Town of Holden Beach’s 50th Anniversary, and urge all citizens to join in this celebration.

Update –
Town has a number of activities scheduled to commemorate our 50th anniversary.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


10. Discussion and Possible Action to Accept Budget Schedule –
Commissioner Freer

Agenda Packet –
Budget Schedule
January          Develop Goals
January          Canal Working Group
.                        Input from Town Boards – BIPB, Parks and Rec, etc.
February        Department Input to Finance Director
March             BOC Budget Workshops
.                        BOC refine goals
.                       
Revenue & Expenses, review by fund
                      
General Fund Revenues & Expenses, etc.
April 1             Draft Budget Message delivered by Finance Director
Mid-April       Budget Message Workshop – make budget adjustments as needed
May 1              Budget Message Final
Mid-May         Optional BOC changes if needed
June 1              Public Hearing
June 15            Adopt Budget
July 1               Budget goes into effect

Local governments must balance their budget by a combination of the following:
    1) Raising taxes
.     2)
Cutting spending
.     3) Operating more efficiently

Ensuring that government commitments are in line with available resources is an essential element of good governance.

The Town Manager’s proposed budget is due by June 1st
Commissioners must adopt budget no later than June 30th for the next fiscal year
Adopting the annual budget is a primary responsibility of the Board.

Previously reported – December 2018
Budget Meeting Schedule / 2018
16 January                              BOC’s Workshop Goals & Objectives / Capital Programs
19 January                              BOC’s Workshop Goals & Objectives
23 February                            Canal Dredging Working Group
9 March                                   Departments Input to Manager
6 April                                      BOC’s Workshop Revenues
13 April                                    BOC’s Workshop Expenses
31 May                                     Budget Message
13 June                                     Public Hearing
19 June                                     Regular BOC’s Meeting
30 June                                     Budget adopted (No Later Than)

This is what I’d like to see the budget process look like starting in January –
Monthly Meetings / Workshops
Board Goals
Review Capital Improvement Plan
Staff presentations – wants / needs / revenue streams / cost cutting measures
Review Towns current level of services provided – change /add / delete
Review staffing and compensation package
Line by line review of the budget
Appropriate funds for the following:
.         •
Beach Nourishment
.         • Dredging
.         • Infrastructure Reserves – Water System / Sewer System / Roads & Sidewalks

Update –
Proposal was sort of a guideline as to the time frame that they would like to see this happen. Town Manager charged with establishing an actual schedule based on everyone’s availability. Once again, the goal is to avoid the annual rush at the end to get things done.

In 2018 we started the budget process in January. The request was made to move everything up and start the process earlier. However, the Budget schedule last year wasn’t moved up in any meaningful way. The Board is still not really working on the budget until the eleventh hour. I am disappointed that we are only now tentatively establishing the budget meeting schedule. The budget process has been an abject disappointment so far.


11. Follow-up and Review of Poyner Spruill Final Contract/ Agreement – Commissioner Butler

Previously reported – October 2018
It has been the Mayor’s position that we need to hire a professional consulting firm because we need representation on multiple topics at the local, state and national levels of government.

McIntyre did a brief recap of presentation that was made earlier in the day on what they can do for us. The consensus appeared to be that we need someone to speak on our behalf and they can make it happen.

Questions that remained to be answered are as follows:
. 1)
What are we going to get?
. 2)
How much will it cost?

Agenda Packet – November
Scope of Engagement
We have agreed to advise and assist you with governmental matters and legal issues that arise and the Client hereby engages Poyner Spruill LLP to perform the following services in accordance with the terms and conditions set forth in this Agreement: assisting with the Client’s efforts to secure sufficient federal funding and timely regulatory and project management for federal shore protection projects located at Holden Beach, North Carolina, as more particularly described and listed and incorporated herein by reference in Exhibit A, which is attached. The Client acknowledges and agrees that Poyner Spruill LLP does not have control over third party decision makers, and, that Poyner Spruill makes no representations, warranties, or guarantees that it can achieve any particular results. Poyner Spruill LLP shall act in good faith with the necessary due diligence in connection with its performance of the services described herein. Two local meetings with the Council and two trips to Washington, D.C., per 12-month period, as well as a monthly status report, are included in the services to be provided. Our work will be primarily on the federal level It is understood that The Ferguson Group will be assisting our firm on your behalf with regard to the services above-described. If the need arises for specialized assistance, such as grant writing or for legislative monitoring/research, then fees and costs incurred for such services will be billed separately to the client.

Retainer
The retainer for our services will be $9,500.00 per month.

Fees and Expenses
Attached to this letter is a copy of our Standard Terms of Representation which would control such matters. If an appearance before an adjudicating body of either of the executive or judicial branches is requested, then services may be provided by our firm at an hourly rate, which currently could range from $375 to $575 per hour. If needed, time devoted by paralegals would be charged at hourly rates ranging from $175-$280 per hour.

OPTION 1
– Federal issues related to Lockwood Folly Inlet Maintenance;
– Federal issues related to beach renourishment;
– Federal issues related to the General Re-evaluation Report;
– Examination of Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funding possibilities;
– Identification of grant opportunities for a second water tower for the Town and review of grant applications

OPTION 2
– Federal issues related to Lockwood Folly Inlet Maintenance;
– Federal issues related to beach renourishment;
– Federal issues related to the General Re-evaluation Report;
– Examination of Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funding possibilities;
– Identification of grant opportunities for a second water tower for the Town and review of grant applications
– Federal issues related to Shallotte Inlet maintenance;
– Review and work toward federal opportunities to assist with industry vessels needed;
– Work on easement issues to allow Town-owned property to be used for disposal of local dredging projects from federal perspective;
– Facilitation of discussions with FEMA regarding response time to Project Worksheets;
– Pursuit of quicker response from FEMA regarding final close-out payments

Previously reported – November 2018
Proposal / Ordinance 18-17
Approval is required in order to execute either of the proposals
Option 1 which reduces the level of proposed services (5) requires funding of $52,500
Option 2 the level of proposed services (10) requires funding of $66,500

For both options the amount to fund the retainer only provides funds through the end of the fiscal year.

Move funds of $66,500
From Revenue account #50.0399.0000 to Expense account#50.0710.0400

The Board in response to the presentation made by this firm requested them to bring back a proposal. Poyner Spruill submitted two proposals with a suite of services offered. Option 2 requires a retainer of $9,500 per month or a minimum of $114,000 annually. At this point we had what could be described as a spirited discussion.

Some of the major talking points were –
. 1)
What are our priorities?
. 2)
Have we utilized the other options available to us?
. 3)
Should we talk to other providers and get competitive bids?
. 4)
What are we comfortable spending?

In the end they asked the Town Manager to approach the firm and essentially ask them to redo their proposal. The BOC’s were able to agree to narrowing our priorities down to just two subject matters – Lockwood Folly Inlet and Beach Nourishment.

Request is to specifically ask them to clarify the scope of work, basic steps, deliverables, and the chances of success

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Agenda Packet – December
Scope of Engagement.
We have agreed to advise and assist you with governmental matters and legal issues that arise and the Client hereby engages Poyner Spruill LLP to perform the following services in accordance with the terms and conditions set forth in this Agreement: working with the Client to secure federal assistance and project management regarding: (1) federal issues related to beach nourishment at Holden Beach, North Carolina, and (2) federal issues related to Lockwood Folly Inlet maintenance.

Retainer
The retainer for our services will be $6,975.00 per month.

Holden Beach Renourishment Project, NC:
Background, Status and Proposed Scope of Work

Status
. 1)
Securing the funding to complete the General Reevaluation Report.
. 2)
Identifying an appropriate project plan.
. 3)Obtaining sufficient borrow material available to construct and nourish the project for 50 years.
. 4) Determining whether the amount of borrow material necessary to construct and nourish the project for 50 years can be obtained without significant environmental impacts.

Proposed Scope of Work
Step 1. Facilitate Discussions with the Corps of Engineers
Step 2. Develop a Detailed Strategy to Get the General Reevaluation Report Back on Track
Step 3. Initiate Implementation of the Strategy.
. • Steps 1-3 should be accomplished within the first six months of the contract.
Step 4. Ensure that the Project is Properly Scoped
Step 5. Work to Ensure that the General Reevaluation Report is Completed in a Timely Manner.
Step 6. Help Pursue a Construction New Start.

Poyner Proposal Options –

Option A –
The level of proposed services (10) requires funding of $9,500 per month or a minimum of $114,000 annually.
Option B –
The level of proposed services (5) requires funding of $7,500 per month or a minimum
of $90,000 annually.

Option C –
The level of proposed services (2) requires funding of $6,975 per month or a minimum
of $83,700 annually.

Update –
Once again, they asked the Town Manager to approach the firm and essentially ask them to redo their proposal. The BOC’s were able to agree to narrowing our priorities down to just one issue Beach Nourishment.

So, let me get this straight –
We go from ten (10) proposed services to just two (2) which is an 80% reduction
But the cost goes from $9,500 to $6,975 only a 27% reduction
But wait, it gets worse …
They reduce the service request to one issue without knowing what if any reduction in cost will be

Proposal / Ordinance 18-17
Approval is required in order to execute the proposal
Move funds of $41,850
From Revenue account #50.0399.0000 to Expense account#50.0710.0400

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


I’m confused… what just happened?


It’s not obvious to me, what exactly we are getting and how much it will cost us.
We just committed to hiring a prestigious law firm with little or no experience in beach nourishment issues. Not to mention, we did not even bother to see what other firms can do and at what cost. Do we know if this really is the best we can do?

Update –
Agenda Packet –
Scope of Engagement
We have agreed to advise and assist you with governmental matters and legal issues that arise and the Client hereby engages Poyner Spruill to perform the following services in accordance with the terms and conditions set forth in this Agreement: working with the Client to secure federal assistance and project management regarding:(1) federal issues related to any beach nourishment opportunities at Holden Beach, North Carolina, excluding  the Brunswick  County Beaches  Corps of Engineers 50-year Project and (2) federal issues related to Lockwood  Folly Inlet maintenance along with beach nourishment efforts for placement of beach-quality sand on the east end of Holden Beach. The Client acknowledges and agrees that Poyner Spruill does not have control over third party decision makers, and, that Poyner Spruill makes no representations, warranties, or guarantees that it can achieve any particular results. Poyner Spruill shall act in good faith with the necessary due diligence in connection with its performance of the services described herein. Two local meetings with the Council and two trips to Washington, D.C, per 12-month period, as well as a monthly status report, are included in the services to be provided. Our work for this engagement will be on the federal level. It is understood that The Ferguson Group will be assisting our firm on your behalf. As the need arises for specialized assistance, such as grant writing or for legislative monitoring/research, then fees and costs incurred for such services will be billed separately to the client.

Retainer
The retainer for our services will be $6,975.00 per month.

Poyner Spruill agreement has been executed and becomes effective January 1st.


12. Review of the Final Engineering Report to be Submitted to FEMA Pertaining to Hurricane Florence Storm Damages Totaling $7.7 Million – Commissioner Butler

Agenda Packet –
Summary
The Holden Beach shoreline has historically exhibited moderate erosion rates (with the exception of the inlets) and the Town has instituted a successful nourishment program to offset this erosion over the last two decades. The most recent nourishment sponsored by the Town was completed in March of 2017.

Hurricane Florence began significantly affecting Holden Beach shorelines from offshore as a category 4 on Wednesday, September 12th, pumping long-period storm swell to the NC coast. Although only a Category 1I tropical storm as it approached and passed over Holden Beach, Hurricane Florence was large and extremely slow moving forcing the Holden Beach shoreline to be subject to extreme waves and surge for several days.

In order to quantify storm effects from Hurricane Florence, wind, wave, water level and survey data were analyzed.  Sustained winds were over 70 mph, offshore waves were recorded observed at over 18ft high, and storm surge increased water levels to between 7.5 and 8.6 ft above MLLW.   Results of the survey indicate that the entire Holden Beach shoreline was Impacted and lost approximately 276,000 cy above -5 ft. NGVD as a result of Hurricane Florence.  Some observed damage to the dunes and recently installed sand fencings were reported following Hurricane Florence.

Based on the post-Florence survey data within the engineered sections of shoreline, much of the most significant damage/erosion occurred in the upper beach generally between MHW and the dune line. Fortunately, the dune system suffered comparatively minor losses, as the wide beach berm constructed during the recent 2017 nourishments appeared to have helped buffer wave energy during the storm but has suffered some significant erosion as a result.

The engineered beach (i.e., the Central Reach section of shoreline) experienced a loss of -202,000 cy, with the majority of this material (-115,000 cy) being lost from the upper beach landward of I above the MHW line. Note that the engineered beach volume losses only include the Town’s Central Reach nourishment shoreline and do not include the USACE nourishment shoreline reach along the east end (-between Stations 20+00 and 40+00).

Update –
The report provides key facts and outlines our losses. Town Manager Hewitt briefly discussed the highlights of the report. Our current policy is to survey the beach strand, inlet to inlet, both before and after storm events. The report quantifies our losses, FEMA reviews the report and develop a project worksheet. Unfortunately, the Central Reach Project area is the only portion of the beach strand that qualifies for reimbursement.


13. Discussion and Possible Action to Begin a Process for Removal of Existing Waste Bin Corrals that Were Built Forward of Houses –
Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Agenda Packet –
Previous Ordinance
§50.04 ACCUMULATION AND COLLECTION.
         (A)   All garbage and household refuse shall be kept in proper containers as required by this chapter and it shall be unlawful for any person to permit garbage to accumulate or remain on any premises longer than is reasonably necessary for its removal. Containers will be located at curbside by the property owner or their representative on designated collection days, and then should be returned to the normal house-side storage location by 6:00 p.m. the day after collection. See subsection (B) for an alternative storage location.
.         (B)         It is the intent of the town that all 90-gallon containers be secured in such a manner either next to non-elevated or underneath elevated houses, except on collection days when they are to be placed at curbside, so that the town street right-of-way remains clear of empty containers, and so that containers are not damaged or overturned by high winds or other occurrences.  For those property owners who cannot make arrangements to have their container placed at or removed from curbside, an alternate non-collection day storage arrangement is as follows: A sturdy, wooden three-sided rack of sufficient size to just hold the required container(s) may be constructed by the owner. The rack must be constructed so the opening allows for the easy removal of the 90-gallon container(s) by the collector on collection days; e.g. the container must roll in and roll out of the rack without having to be lifted. The racks shall not be placed more than five feet from the street right-of-way and shall not be placed within the area of the street right-of-way. The rack shall be maintained in a sound and presentable condition. 

Current Ordinance
§50.04 ACCUMULATION AND COLLECTION.
          (A)      All garbage and household refuse shall be kept in proper containers as required by this chapter and it shall be unlawful for any person to permit garbage to accumulate or remain on any premises longer than is reasonably necessary for its removal. It is the intent of the town that all containers be secured in such a manner either next to non-elevated or underneath elevated houses, except on collection days when they are to be placed at street side, so that the town street right-of-way remains clear of empty containers, and so that containers are not damaged or overturned by high winds or other occurrences. Containers will be located at street side no earlier than 6:00 p.m. the evening before designated collection days during the summer rental season. For the rest of the year containers will be located at street side no more than 48 hours before the designated collection. All containers should be returned to the normal house-side storage location by 6:00p.m. the day after collection.

Update –
Commissioner Kwiatkowski position is that the waste bin corrals no longer serve a purpose. Current ordinance requires them to be either next to non-elevated or underneath elevated houses. Waste Industries has not, for some time now, been rolling pails to curb from corrals. In addition, the Town recently approved whole island rollback of pails to house starting sometime this year. The Board is encouraging owners to remove the corrals or relocate them nearer to the house. They would like to see them taken out of the right-of-way and put further away from the street. Although they are not mandating this now, they may have to in order to get the desired action.

No decision was made – No action taken


14. Discussion and Possible Action on Defining the Waste Ordinance Enforcement Policy – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

THB ORDINANCE 18-16 / CHAPTER 50: SOLID WASTE
For more information » click here

Discussion was about how to combine education with enforcement and how do we effectively communicate the rule change to the public. Pat plans to meet with Town staff and put something together for the next BOC’s meeting. David reminded the Board that they need to keep in mind that there is a cost associated with the enforcement phase. At least three (3) of the Board members want to hold off issuing any civil fines until we are able to offer a fee-based rollout service.

No decision was made – No action taken


15. Discussion and Possible Action to Include Fee Based Rollout of Waste and Recycle Containers in Ordinance 18-16, Chapter 50: Solid Waste –
Commissioner Freer

The saga continues. Apparently, some of the Board members feel that we have only addressed half of the problem. Therefore, we should hold off until we are able to implement a fee-based rollout service. David pointed out that implementing a rollout service was not as simple as it would seem, a number of variables make it much more complex then the rollback program. Peter volunteered to take the point on this issue.

No decision was made – No action taken

The question that needs to be asked is: Why didn’t we have this conversation before adopting the ordinance? The process started in August and Ordinance 18-16 was adopted in December of 2018.


16. Discussion of Possible Beach Monitoring for Pets During Offseason/ Holidays or Other Actions that May Reduce Ordinance Violations –
Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Agenda Packet –
§90.20 RESPONSIBILITIES OF OWNERS.

   (A)   It shall be unlawful for any owner or keeper to allow:

      (1)   A dog off the premises of the owner and not under the control of the owner, a member of his immediate family, or other responsible person, either by leash, cord, or chain.

      (2)   Any pet to be on the strand during the hours of 9:00 a.m. through 5:00 p.m. from May 20 through September 10.

      (3)   Any pet to injure or threaten to injure any person, another pet, or any wildlife.

      (4)   Any pet to damage property, including lawns, plants, shrubs, or trees.

      (5)   Excrement deposited by a pet to remain if the excrement is deposited on the strand, on maintained yard areas of persons other than its owner, or upon any public street, beach accessway, parking area, or campground.

         (a)   Any person owning, harboring, walking, in possession of or in charge of a dog, which defecates on public property, public park property, public right-of-way property or any private property, including vacant lots, without the permission of the private property owner, shall remove all feces immediately after it is deposited by the dog.  All feces removed in accordance with this section shall be placed in a suitable bag or other container that closes and disposes of in a lawful manner.

         (b)   Any person while harboring, walking, in possession of or in charge of a dog on public property, public park property, public right-of-way or any private property, including vacant lots, without the permission of the private property owner, shall have in his or her possession bags or containers that close, which are suitable for removing feces deposited by the dog.  Said person shall have a suitable quantity of bags or containers to remove all feces deposited by the dog.

         (c)   The provisions of this section shall not apply to blind persons using dogs as guides.

         (d)   Violation of this section shall be punishable as described in § 90.99.

      (6)   Any pet to upset or otherwise disturb garbage or trash containers.

      (7)   Any pet to bark, cry, or otherwise habitually or repeatedly emit its natural sounds in such a manner or to such an extent that it is a public nuisance.

   (B)   It shall be unlawful for any owner to fail to provide his pet with sufficient good and wholesome food and water, proper shelter and protection from the weather, veterinary care when needed to prevent suffering, and with humane care and treatment. It shall be unlawful for any person to beat, cruelly ill-treat, torment, overload, overwork, or otherwise abuse any pet.

Update –
They had some discussion with the understanding that there are two sides of a coin. Once again, David reminded the Board that they need to keep in mind that there is a cost associated with having someone out on the beach strand. A token effort was made to address the free ranging dogs’ issue by asking the police to attempt random patrolling and increase their visibility on the beach strand. 

No decision was made – No action taken

Frankly I am used to the fact that most dogs are not on a leash on the beach strand, but it has become ridiculous during the last three holidays. Worse yet is that owners are not removing all feces immediately after it is deposited by their dog. Sadly, this is not that unusual, and doesn’t seem to align with our “Family Beach” moniker. Although I appreciate their attempt to address this issue without enforcement, we are just spinning our wheels. As it is when the Police or Rangers are on the beach strand, we have a significant amount of non-compliance with these ordinances. Maybe a presence and enforcement during festivals and holiday weekends might be helpful. I believe that most of the people know the rules but without any penalty they choose to ignore them. In other words, there are no consequences for their actions. Really would like to see either the police or rangers have some presence on the beach strand enforcing our ordinances would seem a good place to start. It may not eliminate the problem completely, but it couldn’t hurt

Pet Peeve / Abridged Version
Chapter 90 / Animals / 90.20
         •
Dog’s need to be on a leash
.          • Owner’s need to clean up after their animals (It’s their doody!)

People should not have to fear walking on the beach because of dogs not on leashes.
Goal should be to keep the beach protected, clean and safe
Currently there is almost no penalty for non-compliance
No point in having ordinances if we don’t enforce them
We need people on the beach strand enforcing the ordinances
With more meaningful enforcement you will have greater compliance

Dogs at Wrightsville Beach Flyer
Called Wrightsville Beach and spoke to their Park Ranger who is a full-time animal control officer, they issued over 100 citations at $250 per ticket and over 250 verbal warnings annually.


17. Discussion and Possible Agreement on Methodology to be Used for BOC Objectives Setting Meeting – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Previously reported – January 2018
Goals & Objectives
Town Manager sorted by organizational groupings as follows:

  1. General Management
  2. Beach Nourishment / Shoreline Protection / Navigation
  3. Beach / Inlet Funding
  4. Town Facilities / Recreational Items
  5. Staffing
  6. Parking
  7. Communications
  8. Solid Waste
  9. Sewer System

Previously reported – December 2018
Commissioner Kwiatkowski
As we start the year, there would be benefit from a Board of Commissioners and Town Manager meeting to set agreed major 2019 objectives before we begin the budget process. The BOCM should schedule a January date for such a meeting.

By consensus they agreed to schedule a January workshop

Agenda Packet –
Five (5) categories should be the maximum, proposed these four (4)

  1. Policies, procedures, and resolutions
  2. Ordinance related
  3. Financial / Budget
  4. Long term plans
  5. Advocacy

Update –
BOC’s objective setting workshop is scheduled on January 16th


18. Discussion and Possible Scheduling of Date for Interviews for Vacancy on the Parks & Recreation Advisory Board – Town Clerk Finnell

Agenda Packet –
Staff recommendation is for the Board to schedule a Special Meeting to hold interviews for the vacancy on February 19, 2019 at 6:45 p.m., prior to the next Board meeting.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


19. Town Manager’s Report

Internal Control Review
They are about ready to issue report, should have it this week

Annual Audit
Anticipate that will complete in the next few weeks, delay is due to the storm events
The auditor Rives & Associates has advised the Local Government Commission

Storm Events
Three FEMA hurricane damage reimbursement programs being worked simultaneously
. 1)
Matthew $335,000 reimbursement still outstanding, final report was sent
. 2)
Florence @$8,000,000 submitted everything we could
.   • Engineering report is not finalized yet
.   • Federal Beach Technical Advisor needs to complete required Cat G Project Worksheet
. 3) Michael submitted our estimated losses
  • W
ithout federal declaration this might not happen
.   •
Governor Cooper has requested federal declaration
  • No federal declaration has been issued yet
.   • Federal Beach Technical Advisor will write submittal
  •
Additional surveying of beach strand losses underway to meet federal guidelines

Rollback
Statement of Work was advertised
Should be able to bring bids to the BOC’s February meeting

Inlet Hazard Areas
New proposed rules could significantly impact real estate property values
Significantly expands area covered on the island
.by .4 miles on the east end
.by 1.7 miles on the west end
Coastal Resource Commission report to be presented at their February meeting

Panel Proposes Redrawn Inlet Hazard Areas
Read more » click here

Coastal Resources Commission
CRC Science Panel / Inlet Hazard Area (IHA) Delineation Update
Read more » click here


Canal Dredging Project
Previously reported – December 2017
Adoption Resolution 17-10, Water Resources Development Grant ($1,439,922)
The grant is good for two years and will accelerate our current dredging schedule. Each canal will be responsible for paying for their dredging project costs upfront. It is a reimbursement grant which means we do not receive the funds from the state until after satisfactory completion of the project.

Previously reported – June 2018
The Town is planning to perform a complete dredge of all of the canals this coming fall/winter (November 2018 – Mar 2019). We have been apprised of recent changes regarding the obtainment of consent agreements for USACE dredge spoil areas. Those changes will result in closer scrutiny of remaining capacity in existing sites; hence longer/unknown lead times and quite possibly denial of permission to place material from this fall’s canal maintenance dredging in the Corps disposal sites. The Town has been preparing the area adjacent to the dog park as an alternate site if unable to use the USACE dredge spoil areas. David reminded us that this is a big undertaking with lots of moving parts and will require considerable time and effort from the Town staff to pull it off without a hitch.

Water Bill
The Town is planning to perform a complete dredge of all of the canals this coming fall/winter (November 2018 – Mar 2019). It is recommended that property owners begin getting ready for the canal dredging as early as possible by first assessing the condition of their bulkheads so that repairs on those structures can be made in plenty of time before dredging begins. This will not only provide for the best dredging effort, but also lesson the possibility of leaky bulkheads filling canals back in prematurely after dredge completion. The Town will also be conducting its annual inspection of the bulkheads. Likewise, it is also recommended that property owners begin to coordinate the actions needed to move your floating docks in anticipation of the actual dredge arrival in order to facilitate a better excavation near their pilings. Finally, boat movements should also be considered. You may want to begin planning for winter accommodations and repairs to your boat now. Remember that boat dry docks book up fast.

Previously reported – August 2018
Town had meeting with potential bidders for the canal dredging project
He anticipates bid letting date sometime in September
Dredging is scheduled to start in the middle of November

The Town has been preparing the area adjacent to the dog park off Scotch Bonnet.
It will be necessary to close the dog park this winter once dredging project begins.
The dog park will probably have to be closed until Memorial Day in 2019.

Previously reported – October 2018
Construction at the Scotch Bonnet dredge spoil area began this week in preparation for this winter’s canal dredging project. We ask that canal property owners begin to move their boats and docks if possible in preparation for the dredge event. The tentative schedule will begin with Holden Beach Harbor mid-November, followed by Heritage Harbor mid-January, and Harbor Acres mid-February.

Previously reported – November 2018
King Dredging is fully mobilized on site with dredge in canals. Scotch Bonnet dredge spoil area work is just about completed. Dredging operations are scheduled to commence the first day of December working the canals from east to west. Property owners should have made dock and boat arrangements already, but if you haven’t there’s still a little time left.

King Dredging is just about ready to begin with the following tentative schedule:
.   1)
Holden Beach Harbor – December 1st through January 25th
.   2) Heritage Harbor – January 26th through February 25th
.   3) Harbor Acres – Feb 26th through April 9th

Previously reported – December 2018
Canal Dredging operations are underway but is running about two weeks behind projected schedule. The dredge “Patricia Sanderson” started work in the Holden Beach Harbor feeder canal.

Update –
Progress continues, proceeding without any significant issues. 

Heritage Harbor
The contractor anticipates beginning work in Heritage Harbor, which includes canals between Scotch Bonnet and Sand Dollar, in February. Due to the size of the dredge, the contractor has asked that boats on lifts in Heritage Harbor be removed before dredging begins. This will allow for a better dredge in this set of canals as the dredge follows the designed template.  Please accommodate the request at your earliest convenience.


Upcoming Events

Run Holden Beach
The fifth annual “Run Holden Beach” event is scheduled on Saturday, January 19th. They have 1,750 registered runners, expect traffic issues / delays between 7:00am to 11:00am.

50th Anniversary Events
“Time” to Celebrate: Join us on February 14th at 2:00 p.m. in the Town Hall Public Assembly to help us get our 50th Anniversary Time Capsule started. Cake and ice cream will be served. Call (910) 842-6488 to pre-register. Pre-registration is required.

Community Social: Don’t miss a dinner to commemorate our history on Saturday, February 16th at 6:00 p.m. An oral history of the Town will be presented at this time. Immediately following dinner, a bonfire will be held on the beach, weather permitting. Call (910) 842-6488 to pre-register by February 7th at 10:00 a.m.

NCMCA
North Carolina Association of Municipal Clerks Academy
Holden Beach is the host site for their annual training seminar on April 5th

Pickleball
Battle of the Beach
Pickleball Tournament will be held on Holden Beach on May 3rd through May 5th

Christmas Trees
Lowes of Shallotte has donated their left-over Christmas trees to the Town.  Coastal Transplants used the trees as dune builders at the east end access, Jordan Blvd, Quinton and Castaways’ Public Walkways.


20. Mayor’s Comments

In reference to the Inlet Hazard Areas, trash cans and dogs discussed tonight Alan said:

How many times have we plowed this field?!


21. Executive Session Pursuant to North Carolina General Statute 143-318.11(A)(6) To Consider the Performance of an Employee and North Carolina General Statute 143-318.11(A)(3) to Consult with Town Attorney – Commissioner Kwiatkowski and Attorney Fox

The public left when the Board went into Executive Session. I was informed that they were in session for the better part of an hour addressing a number of issues. When they came back into open session, they unanimously approved Resolution 19-01.

RESOLUTION 19-01 / RESOLUTION OF TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH AUTHORIZING FILING OF CONDEMNATION ACTIONS TO ACQUIRE PERPETUAL EASEMENTS FOR THE TOWN’S EASTERN REACH SHORE PROTECTION PROJECT

RESOLUTION 19-01
For more information » click here

The Town will attempt to acquire easements at the east end of the island by condemnation for future beach strand nourishment projects.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


General Comments –

There were twenty-nine (29) members of the community in attendance

The BOC’s February Regular Meeting is scheduled on the third Tuesday of the month, February 19th

Town Manager’s Review
The Town Managers 2017 performance review was supposed to be done on the anniversary date of his hire which is in February. Once again it was not done in a timely manner.


Fiscal Year 2017 – 2018 Audit Results
Auditor’s report is due by October 31st
and is normally is given at the October meeting. Report was not given at the October meeting and it wasn’t scheduled at the  November, December or January meetings. Town Manager reported at the October meeting that the storm events have delayed the annual audit process. The field work by the external auditor won’t be completed till mid-November. The auditor Rives & Associates has advised the Local Government Commission.


News & Views reports what’s happening on Holden Beach and in the surrounding area with items of interest.

Post contains the following:
.     1)
Calendar of Events
.     2)
Reminders
    3)
Upon Further Review
.     4)
Corrections & Amplifications
.     5)
Odds and Ends
    6)
This and That
    7)
Factoid That May Interest Only Me
    8)
Things I Think I Think
.      
a) Restaurant Review
.      
b) Book Review


Board of Commissioners’ Scorecard –

 The goal of government is to make citizens better off

NYC Mayor Koch used to ask – How am I doing?
Imagine if the BOC’s asked you – How’d they do?

Action Taken – 2018
January
Adoption Resolution 18-01, Approval of BB&T Signature Card
February
Ordinance 18-01, Chapter 30: Town Government and Officials / Amendment to §30.25
.   • Removal of “or sibling” verbiage
Ordinance 18-04, Amending the Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#1)
.   •
Beach Strand Dune Stabilization – approved $50,000 in April of 2017
.   •
Approved additional $29,375 for vegetation west of the Central Reach Project
Ordinance 18-05, Amending the Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#2)
.   •
Pointe West stormwater repair project approved $9,000
Ordinance 18-06, Amending the Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#3)
.   • Water Resources Development Grant ($1,439,922)
.   •
Canal maintenance dredging matching funds
March
NA
April
Resolution 11-02, Revoked Terminal Groin Application
Adoption Resolution 18-02, Withdraw Terminal Groin Permit Application
Ordinance 18-02, Establishing the Inlet and Beach Protection Board
Ordinance 18-03, Amending Chapter 34: Parks & Recreation Advisory Board
Ordinance 18-07, Amending Chapter 72: Parking Regulations
Ordinance 18-08, Amending Chapter 95: Streets
Approval of Contract for Roadway Work
.   •
Highland Paving Asphalt was awarded the $92,050 contract
May
Ordinance 18-09, Amending the Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#4)
.   •
Sewer System Upgrade approved $283,000
June
Resolution 18-03, Amending the Official Zoning Map
Adoption Resolution 18-04, Adopting System Development Fees Report
Adoption Resolution 18-05, Amending Fee Schedule
Ordinance 18-10, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance / Budget Ordinance
.   • Approved the town’s $20.9 million-dollar Budget Ordinance
Adoption Resolution 18-06, Designating July as Park & Recreation Month
Ordinance 18-11, Amending Chapter 154: Flood Damage Prevention
July
Adoption Resolution 18-07, Adopting Rules of Procedure
Authorized updating CAMA Land Use Plan
.   •
Approved $30,000
Approval of Contract to Conduct Town’s Internal Control Review
.   •
RSM was awarded the $20,000 contract
Ordinance 18-12, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#5)
.   •
Internal Audit Contract approved $20,000
Approval of Contract to Conduct Town’s Audit
.   •
Rives & Associates was awarded the $14,784 contract
.   •
First year
Adoption Resolution 18-08, Amending Fund Balance Policy
August
Adoption Resolution 18-09, Amending the Official Zoning Map
Ordinance 18-13, Amending Chapter 154: Flood Damage Prevention
Repeal and Replace Development Fee Schedule
September
Meeting Cancelled
October
Approval of Contract for Canal Maintenance Dredging
.   • King Dredging was awarded the $840,000 contract
Adoption Resolution 18-10, Position on Lockwood Folly Inlet Maintenance
Ordinance 18-14, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#2)
.   •
ATM modeling and analysis LWF contract approved $47,000
.   •
Ordinance 18-15, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#3)
.   • Curbside Recycling amended contract approved $9,883
Adoption Resolution 18-12,
.   • Amend the fee schedule to reflect the new recycling fee of $67.56
November
NA
December
Ordinance 18-16, Solid Waste / Amendment to §50.00
Adoption Resolution 18-13,
.   • Amend the fee schedule to reflect the new recycling fee of $82.48
Adoption Resolution 18-14,
.   • Amend the fee schedule to reflect the new Special Event Fees
Ordinance 18-17, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#4)
.   • Poyner Spruill Consulting Service contract for $41,850
Ordinance 18-18, Adopting Amendments to Chapter 30 / Town Government and Officials  .   • §30.26 / Audit Committee
Amending Resolution 18-07, Rules of Procedure
.   • Encourage public participation / Public Comments
.   •
Agenda items require significant supporting documentation


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Hurricane Season –

Hurricane #1 - CR

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) defines a hurricane as “an intense tropical weather system with a well-defined circulation and maximum sustained winds of 74 mph (64 knots) or higher.”

Be prepared – have a plan!

For assistance with making an emergency plan read more here »
. 1) FEMA Ready
. 2) American Red Cross Disaster and Safety Library
. 3) ReadyNC
. 4) Town Emergency Information
. 5) HBPOIN Hurricane Emergency Plan

THB – EVACUATION, CURFEW & VEHICLE DECALS
For more information » click here

If the Town declares a mandatory evacuation, PLEASE LEAVE
General Assembly during the 2012 Session, specifically authorizes both voluntary and mandatory evacuations, and increases the penalty for violating any local emergency restriction or prohibition from a Class 3 to a Class 2 misdemeanor. Given the broad authority granted to the governor and city and county officials under the North Carolina Emergency Management Act (G.S. Chapter 166A) to take measures necessary to protect public health, safety, and welfare during a disaster, it is reasonable to interpret the authority to “direct and compel” evacuations to mean ordering “mandatory” evacuations. Those who choose to not comply with official warnings to get out of harm’s way, or are unable to, should prepare themselves to be fully self-sufficient for the first 72 hours after the storm.

No matter what a storm outlook is for a given year,

vigilance and preparedness is urged.


BEACH & INLET NEWSLETTERDecember 2018
This storm season proved to be active for the Town of Holden Beach. We were visited by both Hurricane Florence and Michael, as well as additional recent astrological tide events that produced flooding. The Town lost approximately 257,707 cubic yards of sand in Hurricane Florence in September, with 201,564 cubic yards occurring in the engineered beach area. Post Michael storm analysis shows that we lost approximately 136,087 cubic yards along the shoreline with 90,927 cubic yards occurring in the engineered beach area. Although the beach took a hit with estimated damages for the beach strand currently totaling $7,797,917 for Florence and $5,623,046 for Michael, the Central Reach Project proved invaluable as a storm damage reduction project. It was instrumental in the protection of the dune system and homes along the beachfront. We are working with FEMA on a weekly basis to finalize damage reports in order to qualify for federal and state funding of repairs to the beach strand. As an engineered beach, approval of project damage assessments by FEMA should result in reimbursements of storm damage repairs.

How are your favorite N.C. beaches getting repaired after Florence?
The storm caused at least $119 million in damage to beaches in the state’s southeastern corner.
Holden Beach is an example of a community that would likely see its replacement sand funded through FEMA. The Brunswick County town suffering $7.78 million in damage to a beach that had seen 4.1 miles in the middle of the island expanded in March 2017, a $15 million project known as the Central Reach. David Hewett, the town’s manager, said the Central Reach area saw some erosion — about 150,000 cubic yards, according to a Department of Water Resources document — and some dunes were damaged on the island’s west end. “Our Central Reach project,” Hewett said, “really proves the case in point that a wide, healthy beach with a consistent dune structure provides tremendous storm damage protection.” Completed in March 2017, the Central Reach project was a locally funded $15 million effort that added about 1.31 million cubic yards of sand to the middle of Holden Beach’s shoreline. When asked how long it would take to repair the town’s beach, David Hewett, the town’s manager, said, “I would hesitate to be pinned down on when that could happen. It could take years. A big piece of that is on the federal government to process approvals of storm damage reimbursements, then there’s a whole process involving contracting, bidding and environmental windows.”
Read more » click here


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