02 – Town Meeting

Lou’s Views

“Unofficial” Minutes & Comments


BOC’s Special Meeting 02/05/19

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet
For more information
» click here


1. Discussion and Possible Action on Setting 2019 Board of Commissioners’ Objectives with Town Management

Town Manager Hewett discussed Capital Programs

These are the top critical issues that need to be addressed:
. 1)
Eastern Reach Deeper Wider Project
. 2)
President Trump approved disaster declaration that provides FEMA funds for Hurricane Michael
   • Florence & Michael storm damage mitigation repair will be approximately twenty    .     (20) million dollars
. 3)
Lift Station #3 Upgrade
. 4) Land Use Plan
. 5)
Beach & Inlet Management Plan
. 6)
Solid Waste Service – implementation & enforcement
. 7)
Lobbying – advocacy engagement at legislative level

David reminded them of the dichotomy between what the Board is asking for and for it to be addressed in a meaningful way without additional tax revenue.

 2. Discussion and Possible Action on Solid Waste Program

 TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH / ORDINANCE 18-16

There was a significant amount of discussion on the issue if somewhat contentious
If I understood their positions it boils down to these issues and concerns –
Non-residents can’t comply with the Ordinance
The rollout requirements are the major stumbling block

They should not have adopted the Ordinance
. a)
without a complete solution in hand
. b)
without knowing the cost

They need to do the following:
. a)
get it right, not continue to make piecemeal changes
. b)
defer the date of the enforcement piece
. c)
to have plan for a fee-based rollout solution
. d)
develop education and enforcement plan
. e)
establish protocols to communicate change before they codify

Agreed unanimously to take a TIMEOUT. They decided not to make any changes now except for the enforcement component date.

The question that needs to be asked is: Why didn’t we have any of these conversations before adopting the ordinance? The process started in August of 2017 and Ordinance 18-16 was adopted in December of 2018. This is yet another major misstep by this Board. Trying to make things work better is not a waste of time, doing it more than once is. That said, they need to start doing it right the first time.


Commissioner Sullivan e-mail
There was a good deal of discussion on the issue. It was decided that no action be taken at this time to amend the ordinance. There are a number of issues that are under consideration, not the least of which is the roll out section of the ordinance. Since the ordinance is not now being enforced, it was thought best that, rather than making hasty multiple incremental amendments, the ordinance should remain as is until decisions are made on all items of concern.

I would like to take this opportunity to point out three facts that seem to be causing a good deal of concern:
. 1)
The current ordinance is less restrictive or punitive than the previous ordinance.
.     • That statement is questionable
. 2)
Roll back will be provided Town wide, so concern about penalties is unwarranted.
. 3) There is nothing in the ordinance that mandates the removal of corrals.


Ocean Isle Beach
Just like the noise ordinance we are not inventing the wheel here but they both got unreasonable push back. Change is still possible; property owner’s rollout requirements are not onerous. OIB ordinance has time restrictions for both rollout and rollback.

Ordinance / Sec. 46-4. –
(c)
All mobile polycarts shall be placed within seven feet of the paved road no earlier than 6:00 p.m. on the evening before the trash collection. Polycarts shall be moved from the roadway by 7:00 p.m. on the day of service and placed adjacent to the dwelling house or place of business, except in multifamily developments.
(d)
All waste matter must be contained in the polycart receptacle. Placement of loose or bagged waste items outside of the polycart receptacle will not be picked up by waste collection services and will be considered a littering offense as outlined in article II, section 46-41.
(f)
Upon a violation of this section, the offender shall be issued a written warning by the town requiring the offender to comply with the terms set forth herein within seven days from the mailing of said warning. Any further violation of any provision of this section shall be a misdemeanor pursuant to G.S. 14-4, punishable by a maximum fine of not more than $100.00. In addition, any violation of any provision of this section after written warning shall subject the offender to a civil penalty in the amount of $100.00 to be paid within 72 hours after having been cited for violation of this section.


HBPOA’s Position –
They have made their members aware of the trash and recycling issues
They have been communicating with members for months
There is a Hot Topics page for Trash and Solid Waste on their website
They have summarized the members concerns and shared them with the BOC’s
There has been no communication from the Town about the Ordinance changes
The Board did not arrive at a workable solution for non-residents

HBPOA recognizes that cans should not be on the edge of the road for long periods of time.  It is unsightly for owners and visitors and blocks the line of sight for drivers. We also recognize the vast majority of property owners will not be able to meet the timing requirements of the new ordinance (i.e., 89% of property owners don’t live on the island).  Non-resident property owners pay the same taxes (some also help contribute to rental taxes) and are entitled to basic Town services, such as trash pickup.  The Town should not shirk its responsibility to meet the needs of its taxpayers.


HBPOA URGENT UPDATE: New Trash Ordinance

Holden Beach Trash and Solid Waste

There is a new Holden Beach town ordinance for trash pick-up that went into effect December 19, 2018!

Holden Beach Property Owners Association (HBPOA) strongly recommends that you read the ordinance and consider how it will impact your situation. A summary of the changes is listed below.

Click to read the ordinance: http://www.hbtownhall.com/files/130333423.pdf

It isn’t often that a new ordinance will touch every property owner, but this one does and brings many changes and questions.

HBPOA has heard a lot of concerns about the new ordinance and we have shared these concerns with the Commissioners in writing, at the Board of Commissioners meeting and in person.

HBPOA recognizes that trash containers should not be on the edge of the road for long periods of time. It is unsightly for owners and visitors and blocks the line of sight for drivers.

We also recognize the vast majority of property owners may not be able to meet the timing requirements of the new ordinance (i.e., 89% of property owners don’t live on the island).

Trash Ordinance Highlights

  1. All trash containers should be secured in such a manner either next to non-elevated or underneath elevated houses, except on collection days when they are to be placed at street side, so that the town street right-of-way remains clear of empty containers, and so that containers are not damaged or overturned by high winds or other occurrences.
  2. Containers will be located at street side no earlier than 6:00 p.m. the evening before designated collection days during the summer rental season.
  3. For the rest of the year containers will be located at street side no more than 48 hours before the designated collection.
  4. All containers should be returned to the normal house-side storage location by 6:00 p.m. the day after collection.
  5. Any property found in violation shall be subject to a civil fine of $50 per offense.
    Fines will start May 1, 2019.

Commissioners have decided that a trash container roll-back service will be provided to all homes, not just Ocean Blvd.

Commissioners are giving consideration to a trash container roll-out service. No decision has yet been made.

Commissioners are now looking at forcing property owners to remove their existing trash container racks or corrals.

As always, you can send us an email at hbpoa@hotmail.com if you would like for us to ask a question or follow up on an issue.

We also suggest you share any concerns or support with your Holden Beach Board of Commissioners.

** J. Alan Holden, Mayor                        holden@atthebeachnc.com            910-842-6061

John Fletcher, Mayor Pro Tem              fletcherlux@gmail.com                   910-508-6849

Joe Butler, Commissioner                       joseph.butler38@yahoo.com         910-846-2185

Peter Freer, Commissioner                    pfreer4@gmail.com                         704-905-4429

Pat Kwiatkowski, Commissioner          pattykwi@gmail.com                       910-846-4040

Mike Sullivan, Commissioner               sullivm4@gmail.com                       614-961-7056

** Mayor Holden does not vote on matters before the Board of Commissioners unless there is a tie vote due to the absence of a Commissioner at a meeting.

Where Your Trash Bin Can Be Kept

The “intent” is for trash containers to be under the house or alongside houses that have the ground floor enclosed. This is the reason the Board of Commissioners is now looking at forcing property owners to remove their corrals. The stated reasons for this are that the garbage smells and walkers/bikers can smell it in the corrals and that the cans are more secure from wind under/beside the house.

Concerns:

  1. Trash does smell, which is why some owners want the containers in a corral away from their house.
  2. The containers in the corrals are more secure from storms than when unsecured under a house. This is especially true for oceanfront homes.
  3. Many owners do not want the trash near their house because renters/guests occasionally dump hot ashes from grills or live cigarette butts in the trash. They are concerned about the fire hazard with the containers under the house and feel it is safer away from the structure.
  4. Trash near the home can attract pests such as insects and wildlife.
  5. Some homes use all the space under the homes for parking, taking a spot for trash containers violates the parking plan submitted when the home was built.
  6. Some owners feel the racks or corrals work for them and their guests, they have used them for a long time and are happy with the arrangement.
  7. It is unclear that the Town can tell an owner where to keep their cans unless it in the right-of-way, it is unclear that the Town can insist you remove your trash corral because it is not a structure, no permit was required to build it. Ironically, in the late 1990’s the Town encouraged owners to build corrals as a solution to the trash problems at that time.

Fines

Violators will be fined $50 per day and each day constitutes a separate offense. Fines will be the responsibility of the property owner. Fines will not start until May 1, 2019.

Concerns:

  1. Owners with rental properties cannot control when cans are rolled out.
  2. Non-resident owners typically roll their trash to the curb before returning home to their primary residence. The suggestion that they take their garbage home with them is not sanitary or practical.
  3. Service providers and contractors often roll trash containers out if they have filled them while working.
  4. Owners have returned from being away and found that their trash containers were used by others and were rolled out.
  5. The ordinance was approved without a solution in place. The Commissioners are addressing roll-back, but not roll-out. They are placing the burden on the property owners to find a way to comply with the ordinance, or be fined. They believe strong enforcement and penalties will make the property owners come up with a solution.

Other Concerns

  • Rolling back full trash containers: the Town is planning to change the roll-back service to roll back full trash containers that were not placed at the curb in time for pickup. As a result, the full trash container might sit under the house for an extended period of time (i.e., until the next time someone occupies the house).
  • Lack of notification and lack of communication: the Town has not let people know about the ordinance change. Property owners need time to address these changes.
  • Expense to the Town and impact on taxes: Besides covering the expense of roll-back, additional funds will need to be spent on enforcement prior to and after each trash pick-up.
  • Lack of other attempts to correct: A better method might have been education first instead of an ordinance that some cannot follow and will incur fines.


Solid Waste Management
.

The BOC’s identified that Solid Waste Management issues needed to be addressed and began the process
beginning in August of 2017. At that time, the Board agreed to review and update the Town’s Code of Ordinances, Section 50: Solid Waste. Town Manager Hewett took the position that we shouldn’t jump to a solution before we completely understand the problem. Hewett wants them to view all the issues together and feels we shouldn’t address them in a piecemeal approach. The Town Manager assembled a stakeholder group (Solid Waste Working Group – SWWG) that reviewed the entire solid waste suite of services to identify issues, benchmark against other islands’ policies, propose solutions and finally compile a report, which was presented in February 2018. Commissioner Kwiatkowski took the point and became the unofficial steward, she kept them organized and moving forward, but this was not any one individual’s decision. Commissioner Kwiatkowski worked with both the town staff and the town attorney to put together a final draft version of the amended Ordinance. There were lots of variables to be considered and they tried to address all the issues and concerns that were identified. Issues were discussed in at least nine (9) public meetings where all stakeholders had an opportunity to actively participate in the process by reviewing the information and giving the Board constructive input. Despite the significant time and effort put into this project there seems to be a rather widespread misconception that the Board has made a snap decision on this issue, which clearly is not the case. The adopted Ordinance is the result of well over a year’s efforts, starting with the SWWG efforts. This was approached in a pragmatic manner, taking into consideration the needs of full-time residents, rental property owners and second home owners. In other words, the greatest good for the greatest number. So, I really don’t understand the brouhaha. I’m a little surprised that the HBPOA took such a strong position when they sent out the Urgent Update e-mail; essentially the e-mail was a call to arms. As a result, I understand that the Board has received a significant number of complaints about their decisions. I’m really disappointed that some of the Commissioners have begun to waffle about implementing the enforcement piece. The rollout issue probably should have been addressed prior to them adopting the Ordinance but certainly can be addressed in a timely manner before implementing civil fines. Most of the objections should be put to rest when we have a rollout option available. I think we should consider this a work in progress that still can be modified if need be. I really don’t see that we will get the desired change in behavior happening without having consequences for non-compliance and that requires enforcement. Feel strongly that the Commissioners shouldn’t fold because they got some push back. The Commissioners should have the courage of their convictions and stick with what they agreed to.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Well, you just can’t please everyone!

Editor’s Note –
Rather than wait for members of the HBPOA to protest about my comment that their e-mail was a call to arms I thought I’d be proactive. A Call to Arms is something that makes people want to take action and get involved in an attempt to deal with a bad situation. It is my humble opinion that that HBPOA in their Urgent Update e-mail qualifies when they said It isn’t often that a new ordinance will touch every property owner, but this one does and brings many changes and questions. HBPOA has heard a lot of concerns about the new ordinance and we have shared these concerns with the Commissioners in writing, at the Board of Commissioners meeting and in person. We also suggest you share any concerns or support with your Holden Beach Board of Commissioners.”

Timeline

Previously reported – August 2017
Town Manager Hewett took the position that we shouldn’t jump to a solution before we completely understand the problem. Hewett wants them to view all the issues together and feels we shouldn’t address these issues in a piecemeal approach. Staff has already identified seventy (70) elements that need to be considered. He also would like to meet with the various stakeholders. That said, he should be able to get back to the Board in November with a suite of options, from soup to nuts.

Previously reported – January 2018
Solid Waste functional review focus group plus the town staff have completed the data collection. David plans to make a full-blown report at the February meeting.

Previously reported – February 2018
The Town’s total budget for solid waste services is approximately $210,000. Town Manager Hewett assembled a stakeholder group (Solid Waste Working Group – SWWG) that reviewed the entire solid waste suite of services.

Solid Waste Report

Conclusions, Options & Recommendations
The Board will need to decide how they want to proceed. Next step is to determine what services they want to provide. Board asked Town staff to formalize compliance protocols for garbage pail requirements at rental properties.

Previously reported – August 2018
Needed: A waste disposal program that encompasses both perishable waste and recyclables, and a solution to the unsightly roadside full and empty bins that linger after scheduled collection, particularly on Saturdays during season. The Board agreed to update the Town’s Code of Ordinances, Section 50: Solid Waste.

Previously reported – October 2018
First Draft of Town of Holden Beach Code of Ordinances, Chapter 50: Solid Waste
. 1) Approved a weekly recycling program during the summer rental season
. 2) Changed current Curbside Recycling fee

Previously reported – November 2018
Commissioner Kwiatkowski worked with both the town staff and the town attorney to put together a final draft version of the amended Ordinance. They attempted to be clear, concise, and have an enforceable ordinance. Final version will be presented at the next meeting. If adopted, enforcement will begin on May of 2019. The Board agreed to have a Solid Waste Workshop before the next BOC’s Regular Meeting in December. The Board is asking that all stakeholders actively participate in the process by reviewing the information and giving them constructive input.

Previously reported – December 2018

TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH / ORDINANCE 18-16

Special Meeting –
The proposed changes attempt to address some of these issues. It will have significant repercussions for many property owners. The goal is to service the most people in the best way possible. It was not the intent of the Board to create a revenue stream from fines but rather to address these issues. The good news is the Board received a significant amount of correspondence and feedback. Unfortunately, none of the rental / property management companies participated in the process. Education is the initial phase, attempting to modify behavior, where they will strive to improve compliance. Letters will be sent to property owners for noncompliance issues. Second round of letters will be a warning that fines will eventually be imposed, the penalties will not be enforced until May of 2019. Thereafter the formal process begins, and fines will be initiated. Well this was supposed to be the final version of the proposed amended ordinance; but apparently, it is still a work in progress. The actual vote to adopt Ordinance will take place at the Regular Meeting tonight.

Regular Meeting –
Additional changes were made tonight as follows:
. 1)
Added language giving property owner some flexibility
. 2)
Changed language that decriminalized noncompliance

Commissioner Kwiatkowski worked with both the town staff and the town attorney to put together a final draft version of the amended Ordinance. There were lots of variables to be considered and they tried to address all the issues and concerns that were identified. Kudos to Pat for taking the bull by the horns, at times it seemed like she was herding cats, but due to her perseverance she managed to drag this Ordinance across the finish line.

In order to be familiar with all of the changes that were made I strongly recommend that you read Ordinance 18-16. Any changes are bound to have ramifications; therefore, you need to know what that means to you. I encourage you to go to the Town website to see the final version that they adopted.

Previously reported – January 2019
Removal of Existing Waste Bin Corrals that Were Built Forward of Houses
Commissioner Kwiatkowski position is that the waste bin corrals no longer serve a purpose. Current ordinance requires them to be either next to non-elevated or underneath elevated houses. Waste Industries has not, for some time now, been rolling pails to curb from corrals. In addition, the Town recently approved whole island rollback of pails to house starting sometime this year. The Board is encouraging owners to remove the corrals or relocate them nearer to the house. They would like to see them taken out of the right-of-way and put further away from the street. Although they are not mandating this now, they may have to in order to get the desired action.

Defining the Waste Ordinance Enforcement Policy
Discussion was about how to combine education with enforcement and how do we effectively communicate the rule change to the public. Pat plans to meet with Town staff and put something together for the next BOC’s meeting. David reminded the Board that they need to keep in mind that there is a cost associated with the enforcement phase. At least three (3) of the Board members want to hold off issuing any civil fines until we are able to offer a fee-based rollout service.


 BOC’s Special Meeting 02/15/19

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet
For more information
» click here


1. Discussion and Possible Action – Internal Control Report and Proposal Presented by RSM

Agenda Packet –
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
We were engaged to assist the Town in developing an internal control risk matrix over its main transaction cycles. In developing a risk matrix for the Town, we considered internal controls relevant to the Town’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design assurance procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances. Our risk assessment procedures were designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the controls that are in place and to evaluate potential gaps in internal control that could lead to fraud or error in the below noted transaction cycles. Gaining an understanding of the internal controls assisted us in identifying types of potential deficiencies in internal control and factors that affect the risks of material misstatement as assessed by your external auditors. We also drew on this understanding to provide feedback in internal control risk matrix about opportunities you may have to strengthen controls or streamline processes.

RECOMMENDATIONS

Finance Officer
While the Town is not required by standards to have a separate Town Manager and Finance Officer, based on our internal control review, we believe it prudent and we recommend you separate the two roles. Separating the two responsibilities would allow the Town Manager to devote the entire day towards high-level Town objectives and the Finance Officer to financial reporting, budgeting and accounting tasks. Having another experienced individual specific to the government accounting arena would allow the Town to implement specific policies and procedures to strengthen the controls around many of the transaction cycles, including mitigation of numerous segregation of duties weaknesses as noted below. As Government Auditing Standards progress towards removing the allowability of the external auditors to also draft the financial statements, having an additional seasoned individual would allow for drafting of the financial statements to occur in-house versus relying on outsourcing. It is also worth noting that several times within the past eight years the Town has received a material weakness as it relates to technical expertise in full-accrual accounting and drafting full disclosure financial statements which would help to strengthen the concerns for separating the roles of Town Manager and Finance Officer.

Segregation of Duties
Transaction cycles have a number of objectives or tasks to move a transaction from start to finish. Having these objectives split between multiple individuals is the best way for entities to mitigate the risk of material misstatement due to fraud or error. Segregation of duties is not an absolute fix for any transaction cycle however splitting the duties is a productive way to reduce possible risk of error or fraud. Entities with limited staff makes segregating duties very difficult however it is important to cross-train individuals across all cycles so that transactions can be processed and reviewed by a number of individuals prior to its completion. Cross-training personnel is also helpful if a member of finance is out for a long period of time. This enables someone to come in and complete the assigned tasks seamlessly with little downtime. The addition of a separate Finance Officer, as noted in recommendation #1 would help alleviate most of the segregation of duties issues noted in the Internal Control Matrix.

Vendor Listing
Currently vendor setup in the financial accounting system is limited to appropriate personnel, Fiscal Operations II and Fiscal Operations Ill. Vendor set ups are reviewed by the Town Manager, however this process is informal and can be verbal in nature or with an email approval. While the subsequent payment to the vendor is then signed by the Town Manager, which constitutes a review, it does not mitigate all risks that an invalid vendor is entered into the system. A potential fraud perpetrator could easily set up fake vendors by slightly changing the name of one of the Town’s common vendors, setting up a P.0. Box and sending a fake invoice. Lack of strong controls over the vendor approval and maintenance process, can lead to falsified invoices being paid without detection. We recommend setting up a formal review process of vendors whereby the vendor information is accumulated and provided to management who then initials approving the vendor to be set up in the system. The vendor approval information should be maintained as long as the Town is utilizing the vendor. The financial accounting system is currently set up to print a report of all vendors. Currently the report lists over 2,700 vendors. Management has not reviewed the list of vendors for potential errors, potential conflicts of interest or obsolescence. We recommend the Town examine their vendor list to reduce the list to only current, active vendors. We also recommend the vendor list be examined for potential conflicts of interest and/or potential debarment by federal or State authorities for previous improprieties. Once a current list is established, we recommend annual reviews of the vendor listing performed by appropriate personnel to mitigate the potential for payments to unauthorized persons.

 Payroll
The payroll transaction cycle is very important to the overall business of the Town and carries an inherent risk of overpayment of wages or payments to an unknown or “ghost” employee. Currently, one individual conducts the processing of payroll. Noted above, we believe it relatively prudent to involve more than one individual in the processing of payroll with a level of detail review to verify accuracy of payments. The payroll system is also set up, that when entering payroll, the rate of pay can by manually updated without a system generated approval or lock function. Rates of pay that can be updated or changed at any point increases the risk that an individual could be paid an incorrect amount and an overpayment of wages could occur. We recommend the Town contact their payroll software provider and inquire of the possibility of adding a system control whereby all pay rate changes require a secondary review.

Currently, Town staff pay increases are at the discretion of the Town Manager. This practice can lead to the overpayment and/or underpayment of employees at their respective positions based on their job function. While the Town Manager should approve all pay raises, we recommend the Town establish set job descriptions for each position, by function and establish a compensation range for the position based on the position’s responsibilities and current market conditions. To establish the scales, we recommend hiring a third-party consultant to conduct a total compensation study, to compare compensation rates of personnel relative to other government units of comparable size, functionality, and general economic conditions. We recommend these rate studies be performed periodically after the ranges are initially established at least every five years.

Capital Assets
Capital assets are essential to government units for the overall support of the public whether through police vehicles, signage, or heavy equipment. Capital assets are tracked on an Excel spreadsheet, which is a common practice as many units see the purchase of capital asset tracking software to be impractical when the number of overall assets is limited. We noted that the information on the listing to track the assets was limited to the asset’s tag number, service date of the asset, description, and cost. Since the listing omits information about the depreciation of the assets, the omission increases the risk that depreciation at year-end is calculated incorrectly, potentially overstating assets and understating expenses. We recommend expanding on this listing to add information on the depreciation of each of the assets, which would include the annual depreciation expense, the accumulated depreciation total, and the calculated net book value. This list should be reviewed at least annually to determine the proper useful lives have been assigned to assets and that depreciation is being properly calculated.

Additionally, the Town issues asset tags for each of its capital asset purchases in order to properly track the asset on a periodic basis. Currently the Town does not perform an inventory count of tangible property using the asset tags. We recommend the Town develop a written policy and procedure over the physical inventory of capital assets on an at least a biannual basis with a reconciliation to the capital asset listing. This will ensure all capital assets owned by the town are accounted for appropriately and assets that have been disposed are property removed from the fixed assets ledger.

Previously reported – February 2018
Status of the Internal Control Audit
Finding: 17-1 / SIGNIFICANT DEFICIENCY
Inadequate Design of Internal Controls over the Preparation of the Financial Statements
Finding: 17-2 / SIGNIFICANT DEFICIENCY
Prior Period Adjustment ($479,789)

Previously reported – April 2018
Direct Solicitation to Conduct Comprehensive Financial and Accounting Internal Control Review
Agenda Packet –
The Audit Report with respect to the Town’s Annual Financial Statements for the year ended June 30, 2017 raised two “significant deficiencies” with respect to the Town’s financial controls and procedures for financial statement preparation. The Audit Report also concluded that any financial reports provided to the Commissioners cannot be relied on, as the ledger does not reflect adjustments made in previous years. The Audit Committee has had preliminary discussions with the Auditor about these matters and the audit process, and as part of that discussion the Auditor recommended that the Town engage a consultant to perform a comprehensive review of its internal financial controls. The Audit report approved and signed by the Town’s Finance Director included a corrective response stating, “The Town of Holden Beach’s governing body feels that there are limited financial resources at this time for training the finance department staff in GAAP and that it is not cost beneficial to obtain additional assistance in this area.” This statement was false. Accordingly, I move that:

The Audit Committee is authorized and directed to review, investigate, report and make recommendations to the BOC on

(i)            the Town’s accounting and financial control systems including “significant deficiencies” related to internal controls;

(ii)           appropriate training of financial and accounting staff;

(iii)          policies and procedures relating to financial statement preparation, preventive and detective internal controls, and the audit process, including engaging such consultants to perform such internal controls review as the Audit Committee deems necessary or appropriate.

Handout –
Statement of Work
“The Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach, via their Audit Committee, is soliciting proposals to perform a review of the Town’s internal controls.

The scope of this work will include a review and assessment of current practices in the operations of the finance department, including the preparation of financial statements that are compliant with generally accepted accounting principles, and the development of financial reports provided to the Board of Commissioners.  In addition, the work should include a focus on the controls designed to prevent or detect misappropriations, embezzlement, and any other potentially fraudulent activities.  

The deliverables from the work should include an assessment of the effectiveness of existing controls as well as their implementation, recommended changes to work practices, policies and procedures to ensure accurate financial reporting, and to prevent certain events from occurring, as well as backup procedures to ensure the proposed internal controls function as intended.

The work should comply with the Local Government Budget and Fiscal Control Act and align with the principles in the COSO Internal Control Integrated Framework. ”

Previously reported – June 2018
Discussion and Possible Action on the Audit Committee Recommendation of the Firm to Conduct an Internal Control Evaluation
The Audit Committee selected the firm RSM from Morehead City for the internal control Review. Recommendation is to obtain firm with a not to exceed price of $20,000.Scope of work subject to approval from The North Carolina Local Government Commission.

Previously reported – October 2018
RSM has completed the field work and has submitted a skeleton draft. Anticipate having a final draft next month, will make presentation to the Board at that time.

Update –
Two representatives of the RSM firm made the presentation. They made it clear that they did not perform an audit it was a consulting engagement only. Recommendations were made based on observations, inquiries, industry standards, and similar size government best practices. In the current environment they look for internal controls to prevent fraud in order to take away any opportunities to commit fraud. After some discussion about the benefits of having a separate Finance Officer they stated that segregation of duties is the overriding consideration in their recommendation for adding the position. No Cost/Benefit analysis was done for hiring an additional person with an estimated cost of $65,000 per year.  The question that needs to be asked is: does the person handling the financial reports have the skills, knowledge and experience to take ownership. Based on their recommendation the answer to that question is they do not.

Public Comments –
Mark Fleischhauer a member of the Audit Committee spoke. The report is the basis for moving forward. Our next step is to remediate. In the cost/benefit equation needs to carefully be considered. They should process the information constructively and should not act hastily.

The Town Manager/Finance Officer needs to be given an opportunity to address the issues identified as deficiencies in the internal control report. Action plans need to be established and monitored. All options should be explored before we add the additional expense of hiring a separate Finance Officer. David should be given the chance to take whatever corrective action necessary to fix this. I personally believe it would be premature to take any more aggressive action then that at this time.

 It will be interesting to see how this soap opera unfolds, a few possible scenarios:
.    1) Town outsources some of the financial work
.    2) Town Manager takes a pay cut and we hire a separate Finance Officer
.    3) Town Manager either resigns or gets terminated
.        • We hire new Town Manager  and a separate Finance Officer

 Stay tuned …

2. Executive Session Pursuant to North Carolina General Statute 143-318.11(A)(6) To Discuss a Personnel Matter and North Carolina General Statute 143-318.11(A)(3) to Consult with Town Attorney

No decision was made – No action taken


BOC’s Regular Meeting 02/19/19

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet
For more information
» click here


1. Public Comments on Agenda Items
There were no comments


2. Receipt of Inlet and Beach Protection Board Report – Commissioner Freer

Agenda Packet –
January Meeting Update

The Inlet and Beach Protection Board (IBPB) met January 24 and the following issues and topics were addressed:

Status of the Beach and Inlets: Staff provided an overview of conditions and issues relative to the beach strand and inlets. The Board was updated on the new Proposed Inlet Hazard Area modifications and will monitor the situation.  Fran Way of ATM gave a status update on the storm damage and the modeling work on the Lockwood Folly Inlet. A letter was sent to the County expressing our interest in the Wider and Deeper project. It was noted that the project was not on the County Commissioners’ January agenda.

Comprehensive Long-Term Plan: A working framework for the long-term plan was discussed and details were added to last month’s outline. The plan will address each unique section of the beach:

  • Lockwood Folly Inlet
  • Eastern Reach
  • Central Reach
  • Western Reach
  • Shallotte Inlet

ATM will be working with us to help facilitate the report. We plan to complete the deliverable within six months.

Budget Items for FY 19-20:  Board Members discussed projects and items they would like to see included in the upcoming budget.  Plantings and Fertilization options were discussed. Mats will be covered next month.  Replacement of signs, collaboration with UNCW and other items are still under discussion as recommendations.

Meetings:  Members of the Board plan to attend the Brunswick County Shoreline Protection meeting January 30.

Previously reported –
Ordinance 18-02 established the Inlet and Beach Protection Board
The Ordinance requires a written report from this Board

Update –
No issues, accepted report


3. Receipt of Water Tower Memo from Planning & Zoning Board –
Commissioner Freer

Agenda Packet –
At the October 23, 2018 BOC meeting the Planning and Zoning Board was asked to further analyze the potential need for a second water tower.

The preliminary report prepared by Right Angle Engineering was reviewed and further research was done with input from staff, Tri-Beach Fire Department Chief and Right-Angle Engineering.

The Planning and Zoning Board voted to recommend a phased approach to the issue. The first phase would consist of a study to be done by an engineering   firm which specializes in water systems and has experience performing water supply studies to determine at what point a second water tower may be needed.

We also recommend that if it is determined that a second tower is needed in the near future that the County be contacted about potential cost sharing.


 4. Lockwood Folly Inlet Navigation Project Updates –
Assistant Town Manager Ferguson

Agenda Packet –
As discussed in previous meetings of both the Inlet and Beach Protection Board and the Board of Commissioners, Brunswick County received a grant from NCDEQ/DWR for a Lockwood Folly navigation Project that would involve dredging the inlet deeper and wider The Town of Holden Beach provided feedback as well as concerns in a letter to the County dated January 4, 2019. The letter addressed possible accelerated erosion, feasibility and cost of the project, permitting and long-term maintenance concerns, how the project will be evaluated for effectiveness, and cost sharing of the project. At the county’s request Town staff attended a meeting   on January 30th at the Brunswick County Complex where Deputy County Manager Steve Stone and the county’s engineer Ken Wilson addressed some of the Town’s comments.  The county agreed to draft an interlocal agreement for the Town to consider and that could potentially be reviewed at the March County Commissioners Meeting. The following information was supplied to the Town:

  • Modeling will likely not be provided. The county views this pilot project as a test and source of data for later large-scale projects that may be proposed for permitting.
  • The project will require a major modification to the Town’s SDI-5 permit.
  • The county views this as a one-time test and is not looking into the future at this time in regard to alternating between communities. A major objective is to see if the number of required dredging cycles is reduced by the effort.
  • While the county wants to implement/achieve a fiscal policy regarding projects at a 75/25 split, they are open to having the BOC make a separate request to the county for partial financial reimbursement toward the project at an undetermined amount.
  • The project as proposed in the county’s grant application will depend on dredge plant availability.
  • The Town made a request, if the project is voted to move forward, that the county engineer and the Town’s engineer work together to create a design template that could potentially qualify the Town for FEMA funds in the future as an engineered beach.
  • Staff is of the opinion, based on existing knowledge, that Oak Island is not interested in being the recipient of the sand for this cycle of the project.

According to an email from Deputy County Manager Steve Stone, this project is projected to cost a total of $4,132,000 with $2,754,650 being supplied through State funding and $1,377,350 being supplied locally ($344,338 Brunswick County/ $1,033,013 Town).

The Town made several attempts to find out the feasibility of piggybacking on the LWF Inlet Crossing Project for the bend widener sand.  On February 6, 2019 the Town received a call from Brennan Dooley with the Corps to say that the Corps does not have the ability to modify their authorization for this project and any additional work to place sand from the bend widener would require the Town to contract independently with Southwind.  The following is the information we have regarding that project:

  • Survey information shows approximately 200,000 cy (with the north widener) of material available in the widener.
  • The Town’s SDI-5 permit would have to be used and it is a one-time permit, complicating having a permit available for use with deeper-wider.
  • The contractor confirmed to our engineer that based on environmental windows, he would be completing the bend widener in April or possibly May and would require a separate mobilization/demobilization.
  • The timeframe of April or May would require the Town to seek a permit modification because of environmental windows.
  • Town staff assumes the Town would seek grant funding through the state and the process is a minimum of a five-week review process in a best-case scenario per conversation with the state.
  • The Town Attorney would need to certify that easements would be in place to proceed with contract documents.
  • Oak Island is interested in the bend widener but permitting may be an issue.

Total cost for the project is estimated at $3,840,000.  The project would provide approximately 200,000 cy of material (with north widener) this year for placement on the east end but would require mobilization and demobilization, as well as, cubic yardage price to fall to the Town unless the project meets grant eligibility and receives funding.  In that scenario, the cost would be approximately $2,560,000 state and $1,280,000 local.  Timing is an issue.

The Merritt is currently here through February 25, 2019 doing a test run after the recent repair. Unless staff receives a different directive from the Board of Commissioners, we will pursue working with the county to draft the interlocal agreement for the deeper/wider project.

Since the Board did not give her any directive it would appear that the Town staff will move forward with pursuing us participating in this dredging project. Christy will bring an interlocal agreement with the County for Wider-Deeper project back to the Board for their approval.  

Breaking News –
USACE dredge boat Murden replaced the Merritt and will be here until February 25th as long as conditions remain favorable. Murden deposits sand nearshore which is more beneficial than the side-caster Merritt, but not as good as putting it on the beach with a pipeline project.  The good news is it is placing the sand off our beach, not Oak Island’s.  That sand is then in “the system” and will eventually append to our beach – not just fall back in the inlet.

USACE Merritt
The Merritt is a side-cast dredge that has two drag arms on each side of the vessel that operators lower into the water. The dredge removes sediment from the bottom and pumps it through a discharge pipe outside of the channel and into the direction of the current. It can dredge to a depth of up to 20 feet. The Merritt is especially suited for maintenance of shallow, un-stabilized inlets where larger hopper dredges cannot operate due to strong currents and ocean environment.

USACE Murden
This vessel will work in the shallow-draft ocean bar channels along the Atlantic Coast.  In addition to removing dredged material from the channel it can transport the material to the downdrift beach and deposit it in the surf zone to nourish sand-starved beaches.


5. Discussion and Possible Action on RSM Report and Proposals –
Commissioner Freer
Agenda Packet –
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
We were engaged to assist the Town in developing an internal control risk matrix over its main transaction cycles. In developing a risk matrix for the Town, we considered internal controls relevant to the Town’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design assurance procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances. Our risk assessment procedures were designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the controls that are in place and to evaluate potential gaps in internal control that could lead to fraud or error in the below noted transaction cycles. Gaining an understanding of the internal controls assisted us in identifying types of potential deficiencies in internal control and factors that affect the risks of material misstatement as assessed by your external auditors. We also drew on this understanding to provide feedback in internal control risk matrix about opportunities you may have to strengthen controls or streamline processes.

For more information go to the top –
Special Meeting 02/15/19

Commissioner Freer did a brief overview

Peter expected RSM to make a number of proposals to address issues that were identified as deficiencies

Since they didn’t, he asked that the Town initiate a request for proposal (RfP) to:

  1. Establish set job descriptions for each position,
  2. Conduct a total compensation study
  3. Setup a formal review process of vendors

Commissioner Kwiatkowski reminded them that the report did not include information that would have eliminated some of the deficiencies. They requested that the Town Manager forward the information to RSM so that they could modify their report. In addition, she asked that the Finance Officer develop action plans to address all of the items that were identified as deficiencies. It was decided that the vendor list should be at the top of the queue. David indicated he would need some time, they have limited resources, but he would tease out the vendor list first.


6. Police Report – Detective Jeremy Dixon

Police PatchSo far so good, it’s been fairly quiet
We are not experiencing any major crime wave at the moment

They have obtained an automated external defibrillator (AED) and have scheduled officer training

Personnel Announcements
Chief Layne has officially announced his retirement effective 1 April 2019
Detective Dixon is formally designated “Chief in Waiting”


Reminder that we all serve as the eyes and ears for law enforcement.
If you know something, hear something, or see something –
call 911 and let police deal with it.


Neighborhood Watch

  • Need to look out for each other and report any suspicious activity
  • Call 911 if you see or hear anything suspicious
  • Fill out Keep Check Request Form if you will be out of town
  • Submit completed Property Registration Form
  • Pickup copy of Protecting Your Home

Crime prevention 101 – Don’t make it easy for them
. a) Don’t leave vehicles unlocked
. b)
Don’t leave valuables in your vehicles
. c)
Lock your doors & windows – house, garage, storage areas and sheds

Keep Check Request Form
. a) Complete the form and return it to the Police Department
. b)
Officers check your property in your absence
.
Property Registration Form
. a)
Record of items in your home that have a value of over $100
. b)
Complete the form and return it to the Police Department


7. Discussion and Possible Action – Construction Management Services of the Vacuum Sewer System #4 Upgrade Status Report –
Public Works Director Clemmons

Previously reported – December 2017
McGill and Associates were commissioned to perform a Sewer Study to evaluate sewer system vulnerability reducing measures. A fiscal year 2017-2018 budget appropriation of $1,413,000 was made to accommodate total programmatic expenses of Lift Station #4 improvements. Green Engineering firm was awarded the $158,000 contract for Sewer System #4 upgrade. Green Engineering will provide all engineering services required to construct a vulnerability reducing structure of Lift Station #4.

Previously reported –
April 2018
Four (4) meetings have been held between staff and the engineering firm to date. The final plans were delivered to the Town and have been reviewed and approved by the Building Inspector. Deliverables – Timeline has been revised. Buildings were designed in the same style as Town Hall. We are currently on schedule, but Chris cautioned that it was still early in the game. The Board requested monthly updates, reporting on whether we remained on schedule and within budget.

Previously reported –
May 2018
We’ve had a slight setback, we did not receive the three (3) bids required to move forward. Officially we accepted no bids, the two bids submitted will be held and opened upon the completion of the second go round. Chris was a little surprised and disappointed since their appeared to be a lot of interest when they held meeting with vendors. We will need to start the bid process over. The protocols on the second bid process do not require the three bids but the caveat is we can only consider quality bids.

Previously reported –
June 2018
BOC’s SPECIAL MEETING / May 23, 2018
Approved award of the Lift Station #4 upgrade contract to T.A. Loving Company in the amount of $1,205,000

Total project cost went from $1,413,000 to $1,695,700 or a $282,700 difference
Contingency funds were reduced from $157,400 to $52,480 or a $104,920 difference
Bottomline, the project cost just went up $387,620 ($282,700 + $104,920) or @27% (Yikes!)

A pre-construction meeting is scheduled for June 28th
We should have a tentative construction start date then

Previously reported –
July 2018
A pre-construction meeting was held on June 28th
The contractor was given notice to proceed
Mobilization is scheduled for the first week of August
Concerns:
. 1) Time to get materials – delay waiting for foundation steel
. 2)
Storm Season

Previously reported –
August 2018
Reviewed progress to date, despite the rain they are still on schedule, gave some tentative project timelines. It’s all good!

Previously reported –
October 2018
Making good progress, despite the two storm events they are still on track to complete project on schedule.

Previously reported – November 2018
Town hired Green Engineering for construction management services. Leo Green gave a brief status report. It’s all good, we are still on budget and on schedule. Project tentative completion date is the middle of January well before the tourist season begins. Leo meets with the town staff monthly to discuss any issues and keep everyone informed about the status of the project. Building Inspections Director Evans gave them two thumbs up for the work that has been done so far; really high praise coming from Timbo.

Previously reported – December 2018
Tentative startup date is now January 15th, station will be fully operational after that date. Expectation is that they should have everything wrapped up by March of 2019.

Previously reported – January 2019
They are making progress daily and are attempting to tie up any loose ends. Airvac is scheduled to be on site this week in order to initiate the integration and changeover of the upgraded sewer lift station machinery and equipment.

Update –
We have switched over and the new system is up and running without any issues. Still have a number of loose ends that he expects to be resolved shortly. Anticipates project will be completed by the next BOC’s meeting.


8. Discussion and Possible Nomination of Member to Serve on the Parks & Recreation Advisory Board – Town Clerk Finnell

Agenda Packet –
Dr. Candace Vick and Stu Atwell are interested in filling the vacancy on the Parks & Recreation Advisory Board. They are both scheduled to be interviewed at the February 12th special meeting and their information is in the meeting packet. No other applications have been submitted.

Apparently, they had two highly qualified candidates. They discussed adding both but were informed that the Board size is restricted, and they could only add one person. They filled the Board vacancy by adding a new member Dr. Candace Vick.


9. Discussion and Possible Action to Have the Town Incorporate the Recommended Changes to Chapter 50: Solid Waste – Commissioner Butler

Agenda Packet –
Summary regarding the highlights of the recommended changes outlined in the statement letter read by Commissioner Butler during the February 5th Special Meeting:

  1. Island wide rollback. Empty Trash and Recycling Containers will be rolled back to the street side of the home, under the home or to a corral if available.
  2. Trash corrals are allowed.
  3. Full containers would stay at the curb until emptied.
  4. Containers can be rolled to the curb early. Eliminate the 48-hour street side requirement before the designated collection day.
  5. Enforcement fines would still apply to those not following the yard waste requirements and those placing trash on the ground or on top of trash containers.
  6. Examine the possibility of providing a rollout program in addition to rollback.
  7. Enforcement and communication reside with the town staff to determine

Commissioner Sullivan thought that at the Special Meeting we had come to an understanding, that we would not make any piecemeal changes, that we would only address the enforcement component, and that we have time to make any other adjustments as necessary. It was a mistake to adopt the Ordinance without addressing the rollout portion, but it would be another mistake to change it again. He emphatically stated that this is not what we agreed to nor should it be done.

 Commissioner Butler submitted his changes and directed the town staff to incorporate them when they amend the Ordinance which is to be presented at the next BOC’s Regular Meeting

A decision was made – Approved (3-2)
Vote was three (3) to two (2) as it has been on a lot of issues, so no surprise there
Commissioners Kwiatkowski and Sullivan both voted against amending the Ordinance

In case you were not keeping a scorecard,
this is where we are at for the time being …

  1. Roll back will be provided for the entire island
  2. Full containers will be left at the street and not rolled back until pickup is made
  3. Corrals will continue to be permitted where they are located now
  4. Rollout requirements are being eliminated
  5. Enforcement fines will apply where applicable

 

 

In the Regular December Meeting the Board adopted the Solid Waste Ordinance 18-16

At the Special Meeting on February 5ththey all agreed that they should not have adopted the Ordinance without a complete solution in hand

Non-residents may not be able to comply with the Ordinance
     •
The rollout requirements are the major stumbling block

They also agreed that they need to do the following:

  1. get it right, not continue to make piecemeal changes
  2. defer the date of the enforcement piece
  3. have a plan for a fee-based rollout solution
  4. develop education and enforcement plan
  5. establish protocols to communicate change before they codify

They unanimously agreed to take a TIMEOUT and not make any additional changes
They all agreed that the only exception would be for the enforcement component date

On tonight’s agenda they had Ordinance 19-02,
amending Chapter 50: Solid Waste, §50.99 Penalty
.    
(C) Penalties for violations of Chapter 50 will not be assessed till May 1, 2020.

The coalition of three that voted for this change didn’t do what they said they would, which was to take a timeout.  In other words, they reneged on the agreement they made only two weeks ago.


10. Discussion and Possible Approval of Ordinance 19-02, An Ordinance Amending the Holden Beach Code of Ordinances, Chapter 50: Solid Waste –
Town Clerk Finnell

TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH ORDINANCE 19-02

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE HOLDEN BEACH CODE OF ORDINANCES,
CHAPTER 50: SOLID WASTE, § 50.99 PENALTY

BE IT ORDAINED BY the Mayor and Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach, North Carolina that the Holden Beach Code of Ordinances, Chapter 50: Solid Waste be amended as follows:

Section One: Amend § 50.99 PENALTY to read as follows (Changes in italics):

§50.99 PENALTY.

(A)    Violators of Chapter 50 will not be subject to a criminal penalty.

(B)    In accordance with § l0.99(B) of this code of ordinances, the civil fine for violation of any provision of this chapter shall be $50 per offense.

(C)       Penalties for violations of Chapter 50 will not be assessed till May 1, 2020.

Item was removed from the agenda due to the changes made to the Solid Waste Ordinance tonight


11. Discussion and Possible Selection of Contractor to Perform Rollback Services for the Town – Public Works Director Clemmons

Agenda Packet –
We received four bids in response to our solicitation of bids for a contractor to perform rollback services. The prices on an annualized basis are as follows:

Fullwood’s Lawn Service Plus            $52,416
Mermaid Resort Services                    $67,414
Coastal Transplants                              $78,000
Lyons Contract Service                        $65,520

The apparent low bidder is Fullwood’s Lawn Service Plus. The Board of Commissioners would need to select a contractor and make the award of contract contingent on review of the contract documents by the Town Attorney.

Previously reported – December 2018
Town Manager – David Hewett
I have been able to develop a budget estimate of $85,000 to provide Town-wide rollback service.

They all agreed that rollback service should be provided for the whole island year-round and that all bins will be rollbacked, empty or not. So, this then became a budget issue. How do we fund this? They finally decided that they would continue to tap the BPART account fund for approximately $35,000 and the additional estimated $50,000 cost would come out of general funds which comes from property taxes.

Item was removed from the agenda

Due to the changes to the Solid Waste Ordinance made tonight a new request for proposal (RFP) will need to be done. The two changes were not to roll back full containers and continue to rollback to corrals instead of back to house storage location.


12. Staff Report on Golf Cart Specific Parking Spaces – Planning Director Evans

Agenda Packet –
At the Boards request staff has looked into the feasibility of (Low Speed Vehicle), Golf Carts having exclusive parking along Marsh Streets.

The staff has come to the following conclusions:
.   1)
LSV’s are legal modes of transportation and already have access for parking anywhere regular cars can park.
.   2)
Currently the parking along those marsh streets is allowed for LSV that are registered for road use, as those are available
.   3)
All parking restrictions both state and local would still apply. (100 feet from intersections no parking).
.   4) It would appear that there are three access points near Marsh streets.
.   5)
Swordfish would have a travel distance of 350′ to access at 915 OBW, Sailfish would have a travel distance of 900′ to Access at 915 OBW, Scotch Bonnet would have a travel distance of 800’to access at 567 OBW.
  6)
There would need to be a Text amendment in the current parking ordinances designating Low Speed Vehicles only (Golf Cart) for those streets.
.   7)
There will also need to be signage for clarity.
  8)
This would be available only in the summer months as LSV’s are not allowed when the speed limit is increased. (Per Acting Police Chief)

 

Previously reported – June 2018
Golf carts are treated the same as other automotive vehicles
Town ordinances state no parking anytime on OBW
Therefore golf carts are illegally parked when left by any beach access points

Golf Cart Reminders
In the State of North Carolina, if a golf cart is to be operated on the streets, highways or public vehicular areas, it is considered a motor vehicle and subject to all laws, rules and regulations that govern motor vehicles. In short, the golf cart must have all of the following:  

  • The driver MUST have a current, valid Driver’s License
  • Child Restraint Laws must be followed
  • Headlights
  • Tail lights
  • Turn signals
  • Rear view mirrors
  • State Inspection Sticker
  • License Plate Issued by NCDMV
  • Liability Insurance

Since most Golf carts are purchased and a bill of sale is given to the buyer, the owner must apply for a title through the NC License Plate Office. In order to receive a title through this agency, you must have a notarized bill of sale and proof of liability insurance. If the golf cart is purchased from a dealer, you must also have the certificate of origin for the vehicle.

All of the streets in the Town (including the side streets) are considered streets or public vehicular areas according to the State Law. This means that to operate a golf cart anywhere on the island, you must meet the standards above. Also, golf carts may not be operated on streets with posted speed limit greater than 35 mph. 

 Previously reported – November 2018
Discussion and Possible Action for Creating Golf Cart Specific Parking Places in the Vicinity of Some of the Public Beach Accesses – Commissioner Kwiatkowski
It was Commissioner Kwiatkowski that originally requested, we publicize golf cart requirements. Briefly what that means is that golf carts are considered a motor vehicle and subject to all laws, rules and regulations that govern motor vehicles. The only exception to our parking ordinance now is that all parking on the stub streets Ranger and Elizabeth have designated parking areas for vehicles, golf carts, bikes and beach equipment. Unlike the stub streets, allowing golf carts to park in designated parking areas on the rest of the island is problematic. Pat asked that the town staff assess the situation and see if there are any areas near a beach access that could have designated parking for golf carts. That pretty much narrows it down to a few canal streets that on one side of the street have marsh side parking.

No decision was made – No action taken


13. Discussion and Possible Action on Text Amendment for Commercial Setbacks and Buffering Requirements – Planning Director Evans

Agenda Packet –
Recently the Planning Board asked staff to look into the adequacies of the C1 zoning rules. Staff found what appeared to be some major deviancies in the setbacks/buffers and presented text amendments for review.

The Planning Board approved the amendments and has found the changes to be consistent with the current Land Use Plan.

Staff also concurs that these changes will make Holden Beach a better place to visit and live and recommend that in the interest of life safety health and welfare that these changes be implemented.

§ 157.062 COMMERCIAL DISTRICT (C-1)

  (A) The Commercial District is established as the district in which a variety of sales and service facilities may be provided to the general public. The specific intent is to encourage the construction of and the continued use of land and buildings for commercial and service uses that are compatible with the family beach character of Holden Beach and serve to enhance the services available to residents and visitors. All commercial activities shall be conducted from a permanent structure, shall comply with the town’s noise ordinance, and meet or exceed the parking requirements of this chapter.

  (B) Refer to the Table of Permitted Uses, §157.054, for permitted uses in this district.

.   (C) Dimensional requirements C-1.
     
(1) Front yard. Minimum required: 25 feet.
Front yard setbacks 50 feet

.      (2) Side yard. Minimum required: five feet. Open porches, steps, or overhangs shall not be within five feet of the property line.
Side yard. Minimum required: 20 feet. Open porches, steps, or overhangs shall not encroach in to the established setbacks, Side yard setbacks minimum required shall be ten feet where landscape buffering meets the requirements of §157.062

.      (3) Rear yard. Minimum required: five feet, except that if a commercial use abuts a residential district there shall be a rear yard of 20 feet.
Rear yard. Minimum required: 25 Feet. Landscaping buffering required.
.      
(4)
Buildings constructed or converted to commercial use after the effective date of this chapter shall provide off-street parking and loading space as required in §157.075 through §088 of this chapter.

.       (5) All signs and billboards must meet the requirements set forth in §157.079 of this chapter

     (6) Building height. No building shall exceed a maximum height of 31 feet measured from design flood elevation to the highest point of the structure.

.       (7) Lot coverage. Driveways, parking lots, parking spaces, parking areas, patios and other similar areas and surfaces located outside of the building footprint shall be gravel, grass or of an approved pervious product. Required Buffers must have the required approved landscaping

  (D) Screening shall be required to conceal from public view HVAC equipment, utility equipment, accessory structures, and other accessory facilities accessory to a commercial use.

  (E) Solid waste disposal containers to be screened. Screening for solid waste disposal (dumpsters) shall be of comparable material and color as the structure they are accessory to. The height of the screen shall be equal to or greater than the height of the container being screened. The width shall be sufficient to permit two feet clearance between the receptacle and the screen to facilitate cleaning and maintenance. A concrete pad with drain to sanitary sewer or a dry well is required by the NC State Board of Health. The opening shall have a gate or slide that can be held in place while being serviced. All other refuse containers, such as cans or bins, shall be adequately screened from the view of adjacent properties or the street right-of-way.

.   (F) Outside material storage. Outside storage shall be within a fully enclosed accessory structure or shall be screened from view of all adjacent properties and the street right-of-way by a perpetually maintained vegetative buffer or fence of comparable material and color that matches the primary structure. Only material, goods, wares, etc. That are incidental to that business are permitted to be stored.

.   (G) Outside display of items for sale. The display of any goods, material, or items for sale may be displayed outside of a business so long as they are contained or secured to prevent blowing off site and are not encroaching upon the required pedestrian way or reduce the required number of parking spaces established by this chapter. All displays shall be of the same product line sold by the occupant in the primary use of the lot.

.   (H) Sidewalks required. It is the intent of the town to require safe pedestrian access along all commercial properties. If the developer of commercial property does not install sidewalks at the time the property is developed, the town reserves the right and the property owner shall agree to pay an assessment sufficient to construct public sidewalks along the street adjacent to the development at a later date.

.   (I) Landscaping required. All commercial structures shall have landscaping installed, by the property owner, to soften the impact of the bare walls to adjacent properties and the streets.
Areas required to be landscaped buffered under 157.062 (C) l-3, shall be a minimum of 6 feet high on the sides of property with spacing no less than three feet. Buffering must be maintained so as to be perpetual in its functioning for the life of the use.

The Town of Holden Beach Planning & Zoning Board hereby recommends approval of the text amendment to §157.062 COMMERCIAL DISTRICT C-1 of the Holden Beach Code of Ordinances.

As required by G.S. 153A-344 and 160A-387, the Planning and Zoning Board has reviewed the proposed changes and finds them to not be inconsistent with the adopted 2009 CAMA Land Use Plan, specifically goals, objectives and policies in section 9.1. Land Use and Development. In addition, the Planning and Zoning Board feels the changes are in the public’s interest because they will promote public health, safety, and general welfare within our community.

Upon approval by the Board of Commissioners the Comprehensive Plan will be deemed amended and shall not require any additional request or application for amendment.

Mayor Holden encouraged them to consider that we should notify owners of these commercial properties. Tim recommended we also notify the adjacent property owners too. The staff will bring back changes in an Ordinance form. The next step would be to have a Public Hearing before adopting Ordinance with these recommended changes.


14. Discussion and Possible Action on AT&T Cell Site Lease Proposal –
Fiscal Operations Clerk Lockner

Agenda Packet –
By now you may have heard news regarding AT&T’s efforts to amend its leases, reduce its rents, and improve its business terms. Over the past three years, the growth of AT&T’s total annual cell-site rent has outpaced the growth of its sales revenue.  Senior executives have made addressing this issue a priority and as our strategic partner, it is important we notify you that your site is one of many under review.

During our review, we’ve evaluated the costs of operating the site (i.e. Rent), proximity to other sites, and the ability to modify and/or expand the site. It has been determined that AT&T must take immediate steps to reduce expenses and improve operational flexibility by amending our current agreement. Without your participation, AT&T may consider alternative site solutions that help accomplish the same objectives.

Black Dot Wireless, LLC (“Black Dot”), a national lease management firm, has been directed to discuss your lease options and help you through the process. Depending on those discussions, your site may qualify for a long-term rental guarantee. Such a rent guarantee would create a secure financial instrument while safeguarding the long-term future of your site.

AT&T values its association with you and looks forward to continuing this partnership for years to come.


Mandy Lockner –
AT&T (Black Dot Wireless) has put forth an effort to amend its cell tower lease agreement citing that tower rents are significantly higher than the AT&T Cluster/Target Rent. They have proposed two different lease agreements for the Board’s consideration (see attached). The Town’s current yearly revenue from AT&T is $29,208/ $2,419.

Option A: Rent is $2,022 per month with a 10% increase every five years with a total term of 360 months (30 years) and a rent guarantee of 84 months (7 years). Rent guarantee value for 7 years is $174,700.80 and total 30-year lease value is $936,057.

Option B: Rent is $2,207 per month with a 10% increase every five years with a total term of 360 month (30 years) and a rent guarantee of 60 months (5 years). Rent guarantee value for 5 years is $132,420 and total 30-year lease value is $1,021,70 l.

Previously reported – October 2017
Discussion and Possible Action on Proposed Changes to the Lease Agreement between the Town and AT&T for Cellular Antenna Equipment Located on the Water Tower – Fiscal Operations Clerk Lockner
 

Previously reported – March 2015
Discussion and Possible Approval of the First Amendment to Water Tower Option and Lease Agreement with New Cingular Wireless PCS, LLC (AT&T) –
Fiscal Operations Clerk Mandy Lockner
This is a modification to our current agreement. We are giving our consent to allow Tenant to install and operate additional equipment on the water tower. The recently completed structural analysis indicates that the tower can handle the additional equipment. In addition, we agree to add four (4) additional Extension Terms of five (5) years each. The Tenant is responsible to make the modifications and to do any maintenance that is necessary.
A decision was made – Approved

Previously reported – March 2017
Discussion and Possible Action on Lease Extension Proposal for T-Mobile –
T-Mobile has attempted to renegotiate the contract before. No action was taken, and the rate remained the same. This time they are looking to get a longer period with lower monthly payment. The concern is if they cut their rate other carriers will want their rate reduced too.
No decision was made – No action taken

Agenda Packet –
AT&T (Black Dot Wireless) has put forth an effort to amend its cell tower lease agreements citing that tower rents are outpacing regular sales. They have proposed three different lease agreements for the Board’s consideration (see attached).   The Town’s current yearly revenue from AT&T is $29,208 with the contract ending in 2020.

COMPANYYEARLY RENT
AT&T$29,028
VERIZON$36,572
US CELLULAR$18,889
TMOBILE$18,062

Black Dot Wireless, LLC (“Black Dot”), a national lease management firm, has been directed to discuss your lease options and help you through the process.  Depending on those discussions, your site may qualify for a long-term rental guarantee. Such a rent guarantee would create a secure financial instrument while safeguarding the long-term future of your site.

Option#1 15-year rental Guarantee Value     $199,670.40 /   84 months / 7 years

Option#2 15-year rental Guarantee Value     $270,144.00 / 120 months / 10 years

Option#3 15-year rental Guarantee Value     $378,730.20 / 180 months / 15 years

The three proposals are for different guarantee periods.  All three options have a 5-year term with 10% increases for each 5-year term.  Our current contract with AT&T is till 2020. All the carriers are looking to get a longer period with a lower monthly payment. The concern is if they cut their rate other carriers will want their rate reduced too. Our Town Manager recommended that we stay with the current contract.

 No decision was made – No action taken

Update –
Verizon is paying us $3,048 month while AT&T is paying us only $2,419 month. The AT&T proposal is for $2,022 month, approximately a 16.4% rate reduction.
It has been our policy not to respond to these rate reduction requests.

 No decision was made – No action taken


15. Addition to Classification and Pay Plan: Water Distribution/ Wastewater Collection System Technician and Equipment Operator Positions –
Town Manager Hewett 

Agenda Packet –
This memo requests the position classifications of Water Distribution/Wastewater Collection System Technician and Equipment Operator be added to the existing Classification & Pay Plan.

The existing Classification & Pay Plan (Atch1) doesn’t include specific provisions for Equipment Operators or Water Distribution/Wastewater Collection System Technicians as individuals performing these duties are currently classified as General Laborers. The nature of Town Utilities work; specifically, vacuum sewer and heavy equipment operations to include those requiring Commercial Drivers’ Licensure (CDL) in the Public Works department has evolved far beyond the skills, knowledge and   abilities of individuals performing General Labor type work.

The proposed additions to the Classification Pay Plan follow:

                                                                                                                     Min        Mid      Max
Water Distribution/Wastewater Collection System Technician       31821    38137   44453
Equipment Operator                                                                                 33158    39474   45790

Addition of these two classes of employee will provide for existing employee growth, recognize actual work being accomplished and can be accomplished from within existing manpower budgets. Two General Laborers will be reclassified as a result of the proposed action and will receive modest market pay increases of 5% (approximately $1700 apiece annually).

RECOMMENDATION:
Board of Commissioners approve proposed additions to the Classification & Pay Plan.

Update –
Town Manager explained this was not a promotion for these employees. We are basically recognizing the job duties and responsibilities that they are currently performing. It could be considered a promotion in the arrears.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


16. Discussion and Possible Approval of Resolution 19-02, Resolution Authorizing Advertisement by Electronic Means for Formal Bidding – Town Manager Hewett 

Agenda Packet –
North Carolina General Statute §143-129(b) authorizes the governing board to allow the use of electronic advertisement as an alternative to advertisement in a newspaper of general circulation.  In some cases, advertisement by electronic means may be a more effective and efficient method of reaching prospective bidders.

Resolution 19-02 authorizes the town manager or his designee to advertise using electronic means whenever it is determined to be the most effective and efficient method of obtaining competition for a contract. Staff recommends approval of the resolution.

RESOLUTION  19-02
ALLOWING ADVERTISEMENT BY ELECTRONIC MEANS FOR FORMAL BIDDING

WHEREAS, contracts for construction or repair work, and for the purchase of apparatus, supplies, materials, and equipment that meet the monetary threshold established in North Carolina General Statute §143-129 must be publicly advertised; and

WHEREAS, North Carolina General Statute §143-129(b) authorizes the governing board to allow the use of electronic advertisement as an alternative to advertisement in a newspaper of general circulation; and

WHEREAS, in some cases, advertisement in the newspaper may be the most efficient method of obtaining competition, but in other cases, advertisement by electronic means may be a more effective and efficient method of reaching prospective bidders; and

WHEREAS, it Is Jn all cases Important to provide citizens an opportunity to obtain Information about major contracts to be awarded by the Town of Holden Beach;

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that:
The Town Manager or his or her designee Is authorized to advertise using electronic means as an alternative to placing an advertisement in a newspaper of general circulation whenever he or she determines It to be the most effective and efficient method of obtaining competition for a contract.

Advertisement by newspaper and electronic means may be used together or in the alternative, and the requirements of G.S. 143-129 (b) shall be met as long as one of the methods used meets the minimum time for advertisement.

When electronic advertisement is used, information about the bid solicitation shall be made available to the public either by published notice, posting in a place in which similar notices are placed, or electronically on the official website of the Town of Holden Beach.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


17. Discussion and Possible Action on Resolution 19-03, Designation of Applicant’s Agent (Hurricane Michael Resolution) – Assistant Town Manager Ferguson

Agenda Packet –
In attending the Hurricane Michael FEMA Public Assistance Applicant Briefing, the Town was advised that a resolution would need to be passed to appoint an applicant designee from the Town. The applicant designee will be responsible as signatory for the FEMA application process and formation of project worksheets. A primary and secondary designee is required. This memo requests the BOC designate Town Manager David Hewett as the primary contact and Fiscal Operations Clerk Lockner as the secondary contact on the FEMA Resolution.

Suggested motion: The BOC hereby designates Town Manager David Hewett as the primary applicant designee and Fiscal Operations Clerk Lockner as the secondary contact on the FEMA Resolution.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


18. Town Manager’s Report


50th Anniversary Events
Time to Celebrate gala and Community Social, both events were big hits. Thanks to everyone that made it happen. They are collecting memorabilia to be placed in Time Capsule which will be sealed on our 51st birthday.


Public Access Grant
Governor Roy Cooper announced that Holden Beach was awarded a grant for $16,335 for the construction of a beach access walkway at 289.5 OBW


Beach Strand
The Holden Beach Renourishment Association is donating approximately $40,000 for the planting/fertilization project primarily in the Central Reach Project area. This augments the towns resources and efforts there.


Storm Events
Three FEMA hurricane damage reimbursement programs being worked simultaneously
. 1)
Matthew $335,000 reimbursement still outstanding, final report was sent
. 2)
Florence @$8,000,000 submitted everything we could
.   • Engineering report is not finalized yet
.  Federal Beach Technical Advisor needs to complete required Cat G Project Worksheet
. 3) Michael submitted our estimated losses
.  
President Trump has issued federal declaration
.   •
Applicant briefing was done
.   • Federal Beach Technical Advisor will write submittal
.  
Additional surveying of beach strand losses underway to meet federal guidelines

Florence 990k cubic yards; 560k cubic yds from CRP
Michael 533k cubic yards; 303k cubic yds from CRP
We are talking about an amount in the $20 million-dollar range
We will need to identify locations where we can get more sand from


Canal Dredging Project
Previously reported – December 2017
Adoption Resolution 17-10, Water Resources Development Grant ($1,439,922)
The grant is good for two years and will accelerate our current dredging schedule. Each canal will be responsible for paying for their dredging project costs upfront. It is a reimbursement grant which means we do not receive the funds from the state until after satisfactory completion of the project.

Previously reported – June 2018
The Town is planning to perform a complete dredge of all of the canals this coming fall/winter (November 2018 – Mar 2019). We have been apprised of recent changes regarding the obtainment of consent agreements for USACE dredge spoil areas. Those changes will result in closer scrutiny of remaining capacity in existing sites; hence longer/unknown lead times and quite possibly denial of permission to place material from this fall’s canal maintenance dredging in the Corps disposal sites. The Town has been preparing the area adjacent to the dog park as an alternate site if unable to use the USACE dredge spoil areas. David reminded us that this is a big undertaking with lots of moving parts and will require considerable time and effort from the Town staff to pull it off without a hitch.

Water Bill
The Town is planning to perform a complete dredge of all of the canals this coming fall/winter (November 2018 – Mar 2019). It is recommended that property owners begin getting ready for the canal dredging as early as possible by first assessing the condition of their bulkheads so that repairs on those structures can be made in plenty of time before dredging begins. This will not only provide for the best dredging effort, but also lesson the possibility of leaky bulkheads filling canals back in prematurely after dredge completion. The Town will also be conducting its annual inspection of the bulkheads. Likewise, it is also recommended that property owners begin to coordinate the actions needed to move your floating docks in anticipation of the actual dredge arrival in order to facilitate a better excavation near their pilings. Finally, boat movements should also be considered. You may want to begin planning for winter accommodations and repairs to your boat now. Remember that boat dry docks book up fast.

Previously reported – August 2018
Town had meeting with potential bidders for the canal dredging project
He anticipates bid letting date sometime in September
Dredging is scheduled to start in the middle of November

The Town has been preparing the area adjacent to the dog park off Scotch Bonnet.
It will be necessary to close the dog park this winter once dredging project begins.
The dog park will probably have to be closed until Memorial Day in 2019.

Previously reported – October 2018
Construction at the Scotch Bonnet dredge spoil area began this week in preparation for this winter’s canal dredging project. We ask that canal property owners begin to move their boats and docks if possible in preparation for the dredge event. The tentative schedule will begin with Holden Beach Harbor mid-November, followed by Heritage Harbor mid-January, and Harbor Acres mid-February.

Previously reported – November 2018
King Dredging is fully mobilized on site with dredge in canals. Scotch Bonnet dredge spoil area work is just about completed. Dredging operations are scheduled to commence the first day of December working the canals from east to west. Property owners should have made dock and boat arrangements already, but if you haven’t there’s still a little time left.

King Dredging is just about ready to begin with the following tentative schedule:
. 1)
Holden Beach Harbor – December 1st through January 25th
. 2) Heritage Harbor – January 26th through February 25th
. 3) Harbor Acres – Feb 26th through April 9th

Previously reported – December 2018
Canal Dredging operations are underway but is running about two weeks behind projected schedule. The dredge “Patricia Sanderson” started work in the Holden Beach Harbor feeder canal.
.

Previously reported – January 2019
Progress continues, proceeding without any significant issues. 

Heritage Harbor
The contractor anticipates beginning work in Heritage Harbor, which includes canals between Scotch Bonnet and Sand Dollar, in February. Due to the size of the dredge, the contractor has asked that boats on lifts in Heritage Harbor be removed before dredging begins. This will allow for a better dredge in this set of canals as the dredge follows the designed template. Please accommodate the request at your earliest convenience.

Previously reported – February 2019
The dredging in Holden Beach Harbor is complete. The contractor is now dredging in Heritage Harbor. This set of canals includes Scotch Bonnet, Lions Paw, Starfish and Sand Dollar. Heritage Harbor work should be completed by the end of February based on the current schedule. The contractor will then move into Harbor Acres. Harbor Acres canal property owners should prepare to remove their boats from canals and from any lifts over the canals. Also, owners should swing their docks out of the way if possible. 

Update –
Both Holden Beach Harbor and Heritage Harbor dredge project has been completed. The contractor is expected to start work dredging in Harbor Acres next week (02/25/19). Harbor Acres includes Swordfish Drive, Dolphin Drive, Tuna Drive, Marlin Drive, Tarpon Drive and Sailfish Drive.


Engineering services
A request for quotation (RfQ) for sewer system lift station #3 upgrade is on the street


Upcoming Events

NCMCA
North Carolina Association of Municipal Clerks Academy
Holden Beach is the host site for their annual training seminar on April 5th

Pickleball
Battle of the Beach
Pickleball Tournament will be held on Holden Beach on May 3rd through May 5th


19. Executive Session Pursuant to North Carolina General Statute 143-318.11(a)(3), To Consult with the Town Attorney

 No decision was made – No action taken


General Comments –

There were twenty-eight (28) members of the community in attendance

The BOC’s March Regular Meeting is scheduled on the third Tuesday of the month, March 19th


Fiscal Year 2017 – 2018 Audit Results
Auditor’s report is due by November 1st and is normally is given at the November meeting. The report still has not been given yet. Town Manager reported at the October meeting that the storm events have delayed the annual audit process. We are still waiting for the report. The auditor Rives & Associates has advised the Local Government Commission.

 Nothing for nothing but it has been like five months since the last storm event.


Development Fees

BOC’s Regular Meeting 06/19/18
Discussion and Possible Approval of Resolution 18-04, Resolution Adopting System Development Fees Report – Public Works Director Clemmons

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Holden Beach Board of Commissioners that the Town hereby adopts and approves the Cost-Justified Water and Wastewater System Development Fees Report created by McGill Associates, dated March 2018.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

BOC’s Special Meeting 08/30/18
Discussion and Possible Action: Repeal the Board’s Previous Vote on Implementation of the Water and Sewer Development Fees as Required by House Bill 436 and to Replace that Decision with an Alternative Fee Schedule – Commissioners Fletcher & Freer

They repealed and replaced the development fee schedule
. a)
Repealed Resolution 18-05
. b)
Replaced with the following interim fee schedule:
. • Water Capacity Fee is $100 per bedroom
.
Sewer Capacity Fee is $2,700 per bedroom

A five (5) bedroom in the sewer fee schedule before June 30th was $13,125
A five (5) bedroom in the new interim sewer fee schedule after June 30th is $13,500
A five (5) bedroom in both the old and the new interim water fee schedule is $500
Total cost of $14,000 vs. $13,625, approximately what the fees were before July 1st

For those property owners that already paid their sewer share fee they will get a credit of $2,700 per bedroom up to and including a five-bedroom house; additional bedrooms will be assessed at $2,700 per bedroom

This is an interim fee schedule until they have an opportunity to reevaluate the situation

A decision was made – Approved (3-2)
Vote was three (3) to two (2), no surprise there
Mayor Pro Tem Sullivan and Commissioner Kwiatkowski both voted against the motion

BOC’s Special Meeting 10/05/18
Discussion of Activities and Timelines to Re-conduct the Determination of Maximum Sewer and Water System Development Fees and Subsequently Set “Permanent Fees Before the End of 2018″ – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

All Pat said is that the interim rates would remain in effect for the next ninety (90) days which takes us into 2019. No discussion of activities, timelines, or variables being considered were shared with the public.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

This was supposed to be an interim fee schedule
They committed to permanent fees before the end of 2018
Then they said the interim fees would remain in effect for the next ninety (90) days
Well both of those dates have come and gone
A
permanent fee schedule has yet to be adopted

Commissioners Fletcher & Freer were the ones who initiated repealing the implementation. Far be it for me to presume to tell them what to do but I’m thinking that one of them should volunteer to lead the work on establishing a permanent fee schedule.


Budget

Local governments must balance their budget by a combination of the following:
.     1)
Raising taxes
    2)
Cutting spending
    3)
Operating more efficientl

Ensuring that government commitments are in line with available resources is an essential element of good governance.

The Town Manager’s proposed budget is due by June 1st
Commissioners must adopt budget no later than July 1st for the next fiscal year
Adopting the annual budget is a primary responsibility of the Board

 Budget Meeting Schedule / 2019

  • 16 January          BOC’s Workshop Goals & Objectives
  • 05 February          BOC’s Workshop Goals & Objectives / Capital Programs
  • 15 February          Canal Dredging Working Group / PRAB / IBPB
    .        * PRAB – Parks & Recreation Advisory Board
    .        * IBPB – Inlet & Beach Protection Board
  • 22 February          Departments Input to Manager
  • 7 March                BOC’s Workshop Revenues & Expenses
  • 21 March              BOC’s Workshop Revenues & Expenses
  • 28 March              BOC’s Workshop Revenues & Expenses
  • 12 April                 BOC’s Workshop Revenues & Expenses
  • 19 April                 BOC’s Workshop Revenues & Expenses
  • 6-10 May               Budget Message
  • 7 June                    Public Hearing
  • 18 June                  Regular BOC’s Meeting – Ordinance Consideration
  • 1 July                     Budget adopted (No Later Than)

News & Views reports what’s happening on Holden Beach and in the surrounding area with items of interest.

Post contains the following:
. 1)
Calendar of Events
. 2)
Reminders
. 3)
Upon Further Review
. 4)
Corrections & Amplifications
. 5)
Odds and Ends
. 6)
This and That
. 7)
Factoid That May Interest Only Me
. 8)
Things I Think I Think
.   
a) Restaurant Review
.   
b) Book Review


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Hurricane Season –

Hurricane #1 - CR

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) defines a hurricane as “an intense tropical weather system with a well-defined circulation and maximum sustained winds of 74 mph (64 knots) or higher.”

Be prepared – have a plan!

For assistance with making an emergency plan read more here »
. 1) FEMA Ready
. 2) American Red Cross Disaster and Safety Library
. 3) ReadyNC
. 4) Town Emergency Information
. 5) HBPOIN Hurricane Emergency Plan

THB – EVACUATION, CURFEW & VEHICLE DECALS
For more information » click here

If the Town declares a mandatory evacuation, PLEASE LEAVE
General Assembly during the 2012 Session, specifically authorizes both voluntary and mandatory evacuations, and increases the penalty for violating any local emergency restriction or prohibition from a Class 3 to a Class 2 misdemeanor. Given the broad authority granted to the governor and city and county officials under the North Carolina Emergency Management Act (G.S. Chapter 166A) to take measures necessary to protect public health, safety, and welfare during a disaster, it is reasonable to interpret the authority to “direct and compel” evacuations to mean ordering “mandatory” evacuations. Those who choose to not comply with official warnings to get out of harm’s way, or are unable to, should prepare themselves to be fully self-sufficient for the first 72 hours after the storm.

No matter what a storm outlook is for a given year,

vigilance and preparedness is urged.


BEACH & INLET NEWSLETTERDecember 2018
This storm season proved to be active for the Town of Holden Beach. We were visited by both Hurricane Florence and Michael, as well as additional recent astrological tide events that produced flooding. The Town lost approximately 257,707 cubic yards of sand in Hurricane Florence in September, with 201,564 cubic yards occurring in the engineered beach area. Post Michael storm analysis shows that we lost approximately 136,087 cubic yards along the shoreline with 90,927 cubic yards occurring in the engineered beach area. Although the beach took a hit with estimated damages for the beach strand currently totaling $7,797,917 for Florence and $5,623,046 for Michael, the Central Reach Project proved invaluable as a storm damage reduction project. It was instrumental in the protection of the dune system and homes along the beachfront. We are working with FEMA on a weekly basis to finalize damage reports in order to qualify for federal and state funding of repairs to the beach strand. As an engineered beach, approval of project damage assessments by FEMA should result in reimbursements of storm damage repairs.

Trump issues disaster declaration for North Carolina
President Donald Trump has approved a major disaster declaration for North Carolina to provide for federal assistance to areas impacted by Tropical Storm Michael last fall. The declaration was announced in a news release issued Thursday (01/31/19) and covers 21 counties statewide. It provides federal funding for state and local government and certain private nonprofit organizations on a cost-sharing basis for emergency work and the repair or replacement of facilities damaged Oct. 10 to 12 by the tropical storm. Counties affected by the declaration are Alamance, Brunswick, Caswell, Chatham, Dare, Davidson, Davie, Forsyth, Granville, Hyde, Iredell, McDowell, Montgomery, Orange, Person, Randolph, Rockingham, Stokes, Surry, Vance and Yadkin. Hurricane Michael slammed into Florida’s Panhandle with 155 mph (250 kph) winds on Oct. 10 and also blew through Georgia, the Carolinas and Virginia.
Read more » click here


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