12 – Town Meeting

Lou’s Views

“Unofficial” Minutes & Comments


BOC’s Regular Meeting 12/17/19

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet click here

Audio Recording » click here


1. Old Business: Discussion and Possible Action on Contract Amendment to the Solid Waste and Recyclables Collection, Transportation and Disposal Agreement Between the Town and Waste Industries – Allen Thienpont (Public Works Director Clemmons)

Agenda Packet –
Waste Industries has provided the Town with a proposed amendment to the Solid Waste and Recyclables Collection, Transportation and Disposal Agreement. The current agreement’s term is through December 31,2019.

The amendment would extend the initial term by two years, with the end date being December 31, 2021. Per the amendment, there will be a $0.50 per month per cart increase. Waste Industries has explained the increase is due to their cost of doing business over the last year, in particular a large increase they took on in January when they changed their third-party haulers to haul the waste from the transfer station to the landfill. They said the change was necessary as the previous hauler was not following the terms of the contract and could not keep up with the volume of tons that go through the transfer station each day. Waste Industries is also raising their fixed rate service fee from 2% to 3% per year.

The cost for the service in the months with a second pickup will increase $1,818. The current budget supports the increase for the remainder of this fiscal year. However, adjustments will need to be made in next year’s budget to accommodate the increase.

Allen Thienpont, General Manager of Waste Industries will be in attendance to answer any questions the Board may have.

Update –
Staff recommends approval

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


2. Presentation of Plaque to the Outgoing Board of Commissioners by Town Manager Hewett

Recognition was given to all the outgoing board.
The plaque was presented to everyone elected in 2017 and followed by a photo-op.
The plaque will be hung in the Town Hall.


3. Presentation of Plaques to Individual Members of the Outgoing Board of Commissioners by Mayor Holden
.   a.
Joe Butler
  b.
John Fletcher
  c.
Peter Freer

All three (3) outgoing Commissioners received plaques of appreciation from the town for their service. The plaque was presented to each individually and followed by a photo-op.

I’d personally like to thank the Commissioners
for their dedicated service to the community.


4. Judge Fred Gore will Present the Oath of Office to the Incoming Board of Commissioners
.   a.
Mayor J. Alan Holden
.   b.
Commissioners Gerald Brown, Woody Tyner, *Brian Murdock, Mike Sullivan and Pat Kwiatkowski

* Commissioner-Elect Brian Murdock was not in attendance due to a prior commitment, he will be sworn in as a Commissioner by the Town Clerk at an alternate time.

Fred Gore is a District Court Judge in Judicial District 13, which covers Brunswick, Bladen and Columbus counties. The 13th Judicial District judges preside primarily over civil, criminal and juvenile matters. Gore a native of Brunswick County is also a property owner on Holden Beach.

 

Judge Gore presided over the swearing in ceremony
. • Elected officials were sworn in one at a time
.
They each took the oaths of office and then took their seats on the council
.
Some family members participated in the ceremony


5. Election of Mayor Pro Tempore – Town Clerk Finnell

Agenda Packet –
Per Section 30.05, Mayor Pro Tempore of the Holden Beach Code of Ordinances, the Board shall elect from one of its members a Mayor Pro Tem and an Executive Secretary, who cannot be the same member. The normal term of office for both positions is one year, commencing with the December meeting.

Previously reported –
Per Town Ordinance §30.05 and North Carolina General Statute §160A-70
§30.05 MAYOR PRO TEMPORE AND EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
The BOC shall elect from one of its members: (1) a Mayor Pro Tempore, and (2) an Executive Secretary, who shall not be the same member. The normal term of office of both the Mayor Pro Tempore and the Executive Secretary shall be one year, commencing at the first regular meeting in December; provide, however that each shall serve at the pleasure of the BOC.

The Mayor Pro Tempore shall discharge the duties and exercise the powers and authority of Mayor in the absence, disability, disqualification of the Mayor and during a vacancy in the office of Mayor; provided his or her rights and duties as BOC shall remain unimpaired; except he or she shall receive the salary or expenses of Mayor when serving in that capacity.  No additional oath of office shall be required of the Mayor Pro Tempore upon assuming the duties of the Mayor beyond that oath taken at the time of appointment to Mayor Pro Tempore.

Mayor Pro Tem is elected by the Board of Commissioners and is not necessarily the person with the most votes in the general election. The selection of Mayor Pro Tem is at the discretion of the other elected commissioners. Although traditionally the person with the most votes has been selected the rules do not require it.

Candidate                            Position                   Term             Votes
Gerald Brown                       Commissioner          Second          246
Woody Tyner                        Commissioner          First              230
Brian Murdock                     Commissioner          First              225
Mike Sullivan                        Commissioner          Second          182
Patricia Kwiatkowski          Commissioner          Second          168

Update –
Discussion and Nomination of Board Member to the Mayor Pro Tem Position
Commissioner Sullivan made a motion to nominate Gerald Brown for Mayor Pro Tem Gerald Brown, the top vote getter, was elected as Mayor Pro Tem

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


6. Election of Executive Secretary – Town Clerk Finnell

Agenda Packet –
Per Section 30.05, Mayor Pro Tempore of the Holden Beach Code of Ordinances, the Board shall elect from one of its members a mayor pro tern and an executive secretary, who cannot be the same member. The normal term of office for both positions is one year, commencing with the December meeting.

Previously reported –
Per Town Ordinance §30.05 and North Carolina General Statute §160A-70 §30.05 MAYOR PRO TEMPORE AND EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
The BOC shall elect from one of its members: (1) a Mayor Pro Tempore, and (2) an Executive Secretary, who shall not be the same member. The normal term of office of both the Mayor Pro Tempore and the Executive Secretary shall be one year, commencing at the first regular meeting in December; provide, however that each shall serve at the pleasure of the BOC.

The Executive Secretary shall be responsible for: (1) creating the agenda for each regular and special meeting of the BOC, and (2) assembling all supporting agenda package materials, in consultation with the other members of the BOC and the Town Manager and Town Attorney, as applicable. The Executive Secretary shall timely deliver the same to the Town Clerk for copying, delivery and publication in accordance with these ordinances and the Rules of Procedure provided for herein. The Town Clerk and Town Manager shall provide logistical and advisory support to the Executive Secretary in performing these functions and the Town Attorney shall provide legal interpretation or support as requested by the Executive Secretary. No notice of any regular or special meeting of the BOC, nor any agenda or agenda package materials with respect thereto shall be delivered or published by the Town Clerk without the express prior authorization of the Executive Secretary.

Update –
Discussion and Nomination of Board Member to the Executive Secretary Position
Commissioner Tyner made a motion to nominate Pat K Executive Secretary
Commissioner Kwiatkowski was elected as Executive Secretary

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


7. Discussion and Possible Approval of 2020 Board of Commissioners’ Meeting Schedule – Town Clerk Finnell

Agenda Packet –
Enclosed is the proposed 2020 Board of Commissioners’ Regular Meeting Schedule. All dates, except for the February date, reflect the third Tuesday of the month. The proposed February date is for the second Tuesday of the month, due to scheduling conflicts. Staff recommends approval.

2020 BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS’ MEETING SCHEDULE
Regular Meetings are held on the third Tuesday of each month

TUESDAY, JANUARY 21st
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11th                         * Moved to the second Tuesday of the month
TUESDAY, MARCH 17th
TUESDAY, APRIL 21st
TUESDAY, MAY 19th
TUESDAY, JUNE 16th
TUESDAY, JULY 21st
TUESDAY, AUGUST 18th
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15th
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20th                         
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 17th
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15th

Meeting schedule was adopted with no changes.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


8. Discussion and Possible Direction on Rules of Procedure for the Board of Commissioners – Town Clerk Finnell

Agenda Packet –
The Board of Commissioners is required to adopt Rules of Procedure per the Town’s Code of Ordinances, Section 30.19.

I have included the version currently being used. Another version. the Suggested Rules of Procedure for a City Council, by the School of Government has also been used in the past. A copy of this version is also included in your packets. If the Board chooses to adopt either version for the upcoming term, the entire rules can be adopted, or amendments may be made.

I suggest the Board review the materials and adopt rules at the January meeting.

Update –
The Board is required to adopt some version of Rules of Procedure each year. Heather has given them two (2) options or they can create their own new version. Pat has volunteered to review current version and make recommendations of any necessary changes. This will be on the agenda again next month so that they can adopt rules as required.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


9. Police Report – Chief Jeremy Dixon

Police Patch
It’s that time of the year, break-in season

Three vehicles on the east end were broken into recently


 Previously reported –
Public Service Announcement – Chief Wally Layne
Most crimes are crimes of opportunity. He used the term break-ins loosely since most of the vehicles were left unlocked. He preaches the same sermon to us each year to protect your personal property. Don’t be a volunteer victim! Remove all items of value from your vehicle when you are not driving it. Always lock your vehicle doors when you are not in it. Leaving items on display, whether on the dashboard or sitting on a passenger seat, is an invitation to opportunist individuals. Make sure to follow these important tips!


Requested that we all serve as the eyes and ears for law enforcement.
If you know something, hear something, or see something –
call 911 and let police deal with it.


Crime Prevention 101 – Don’t make it easy for them
Don’t leave vehicles unlocked
Don’t leave valuables in your vehicles


Neighborhood Watch

  • Need to look out for each other and report any suspicious activity
  • Call 911 if you see or hear anything suspicious
  • Fill out Keep Check Request Form if you will be out of town
  • Submit completed Property Registration Form
  • Pickup copy of Protecting Your Home

Crime prevention 101 – Don’t make it easy for them
. a) Don’t leave vehicles unlocked
. b)
Don’t leave valuables in your vehicles
. c)
Lock your doors & windows – house, garage, storage areas and sheds

Keep Check Request Form
. a) Complete the form and return it to the Police Department
. b)
Officers check your property in your absence
.
Property Registration Form
. a)
Record of items in your home that have a value of over $100
. b)
Complete the form and return it to the Police Department


10. Discussion and Possible Scheduling of a Special Meeting to Interview Applicants for Vacancy on the Planning & Zoning Board and the Audit Committee – Town Clerk Finnell

Agenda Packet –
Due to Woody Tyner being elected as a commissioner, there will be an Alternate Member vacancy on the Planning & Zoning Board. I recommend scheduling a special meeting at 6:45 p.m. on January 21st to conduct interviews for people interested in serving.

Update –
Interviews will be scheduled before the next Regular Meeting in January

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


Volunteers needed
We have vacancies on two (2)  boards. The Town is always looking for people to volunteer for their various boards and committees. If you are interested, submit a resume form to heather@hbtownhall.com.


11. Discussion on Establishing a Date Certain for a Special Meeting to Include the Members of the Land Use Planning Committee to Discuss the Pending Land Use Plan – Commissioner Sullivan

Agenda Packet –
Draft Land Use Plan » click here

Previously reported – September 2019
Land Use Plan
For more information » click here

Land Use Plan Steering Committee’s meeting was held on August 27th.
This should be their last meeting; a draft will be sent to P&Z for approval.
Land Use Plan Engagement Session was held on September 17th.

HBPOA
What is the Land Use Plan?
“Holden Beach’s Land Use Plan provides guidance to local decision-makers seeking to achieve the community’s long-term vision. This process allows public officials, staff, and other stakeholders to be proactive rather than reactive in maintaining Holden Beach’s status as one of the finest family oriented coastal communities on the East Coast of the United States. This plan builds on the previous land use plans prepared by Holden Beach in 1980, 1985, 1990, 1997, and 2009. It encompasses all geographic areas in the community; considering issues of future land use, development, and natural resource protection. The plan is long-range in nature and looks beyond current issues to address potential future land use and environmental issues over the next 10 to 15 years and beyond.”   

Previously reported – October 2019
Agenda Packet –
As the Board of Commissioners are aware, the Land Use Plan Committee completed their work as commissioned by the Board of Commissioners. The LUP was then sent to the Holden Beach Planning and Zoning Board where a public hearing was held. The P&Z Board approved sending the completed document for review.

The P&Z Board requested that another public hearing be set before the Board of Commissioners’ meeting. They erred in this request, as only the Board of Commissioners can set their public hearings. While a second public hearing is not necessary at this time, the Board may request such if they feel the need arises.

The P&Z Board provided three recommendations:
.     1. Accept the Document and send it forward to DEQ for staff review.
    2.
Send the Document Back to the LUP Committee with changes.
    3. Amend the document.

* If the document is amended any amendments will need to be reviewed by Wes McLeod and staff for compliance with the 7B statutory requirements.

It is important to understand that while the document is a guideline and a mirror of the community’s philosophies, it is not a regulatory document. It is basically a comprehensive guideline to show that the town’s future is directed towards those ideals as set forth in the Statues.

Wes explained the procedure to get this plan adopted. It has been recommended for approval by both Boards that worked on it (Land Use Plan Committee & Planning and Zoning Board). The statuary process for this to be adopted requires it to be submitted to the Division of Coastal Management (DCM) for completeness review. After that 75-day review process we are still required to have a Public Hearing, after that it can then be adopted by the BOC’s. It then goes back to the DCM for certification.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously
Only approved submitting proposed Land Use Plan to DCM for their review

Update –
Board will coordinate their schedules to determine date of meeting

For starters, the plan merely sets guidelines which can be changed as the situation requires. What’s more it is nonbinding. Every land use or zoning decision needs a consistency statement that says whether the recommendation conforms to the LUP or not.   We can recommend something that does not conform if we state why it is in the best interest to do that.  A considerable amount of time and effort were put in to develop this plan. The BOC’s had a chance to give input on the plan, along with the rest of the Town, at the input meetings and at every LUP meeting.  All shareholders were involved in the process and contributed a significant amount of input.  It is a compromise document, no one got everything they wanted in it. Cannot imagine what value the BOC’s think that they can add to what was already submitted.


12. Discussion and Possible Direction on a Proposed Directive Regarding Board of Commissioners’ Requests to Advisory Boards or Committees – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Agenda Packet –
Noted comments from Commissioners at the November meeting: the directive should be adopted by resolution, the work opinion should be eliminated, and since there may be infrequent occasions where a request comes out of a special meeting, the statement should be altered to read “The directive for a recommendation from a specific Board or Committee will preferably be made by a vote at a BOC regular meeting.”.

Previously reported – November 2019
Agenda Packet –
Draft: Directive for Town of Holden Beach (THB) Board of Commissioner
Requests for Opinion/Recommendation to Advisory Boards or Committees

The Board of Commissioners (BOC) is responsible for policy making as well as decisions on administrative matters (School of Government publication “County and Municipal Government in North Carolina”, Chapter 3, County and City Governing Boards). The BOC performs its duties when convened in legal meetings, addressing items contained in the meeting agenda. There are occasions when the BOC may determine that a recommendation or opinion from a THB Advisory Board or Committee on an item related to the Town’s current operations or future development would assist the BOC in making the best possible decision for the Town. When seeking Advisory Board (AB) or Committee (AC) recommendation/opinion, the following steps shall be followed:

. 1) The directive for a recommendation/opinion from a specific Board or Committee shall be made by vote at a Board of Commissioners regular meeting;

. 2) Specific charge questions for the opinion will be finalized and agreed by vote at a Board of Commissioners meeting;

. 3) A proposed deadline for receiving the recommendation/opinion will be included in the directive.

For recommendations/opinions having potential implications on Town finance, Town capital projects, Town contracts or Town departmental processes, the AB/AC shall provide its recommendation/opinion in a report to the BOC, such report to contain:

      1. The original BOC directive and charge;
      2. The AB/AC recommendation/opinion;
      3. The AB/AC vote tally;
      4. A synopsis of the discussions leading to the recommendation/opinion of the AB/AC, said synopsis to be discussed and approved at an Advisory Board/Committee public meeting;
      5. Copies of presentations or written positions given by staff or external experts during the evaluation process;
      6. References to supporting documents or publications used in the decision­ making process;
      7. Copies of minutes of public meetings at which the directive for opinion was discussed.
    1. In order to normalize the process and improve the quality of public records of recommendations/opinions, a form entitled “Town of Holden Beach Advisory Board/Committee Recommendation/Opinion” will be used. A suggested format is provided below.

Town of Holden Beach Board Advisory Board/Committee

Recommendation/Opinion


From the BOC to the Board/Committee

Date of BOC Meeting When Directive was Made:

Agenda Item #:

Directive to:(specify AB/AC)

Issue and Action Requested:

Background and Potential Implications:

Charge Questions:

Proposed Deadline:


To the BOC from the Board/ Committee

AB/AC Recommendation/Opinion:


Completed by Town clerk after BOC takes action

Date of BOC Meeting When Decision was Made

BOC Decision:

BOC Vote Tally:

ATTACHMENTS:

Pat explained that this was simply a proposal. She said that it was being put out there for review and feedback. To codify this directive, it will be issued as an administrative document adopted by resolution, not an ordinance.

No decision was made – No action taken

Update –
Pat explained that this was just a second reading of her proposal and it was being put out there for review and feedback. They have not received any feedback yet. Next month it will be issued as an administrative document adopted by resolution, not an ordinance.

No decision was made – No action taken


13. Discussion and Possible Direction on a More Formal Procedure for the Board of Commissioners’ Requests for Actions to the Town Manager or Town Attorney – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Previously reported – November 2019
Agenda Packet –
BOC Meetings often result in requests for Town Manager or Attorney action. There are times when the full ask is not clearly expressed by the Board, leading to confusion and time loss by Staff as they try to get clarity from meeting tapes or follow-up discussion with Commissioners.

A written form for BOC requests made to the Town Manager or Town Attorney that result from discussion and agreement at BOC Meetings could reduce the level of uncertainty that sometimes results, particularly after a lengthy debate.

Below is a draft of what a form might look like.


THB Board of Commissioner Requests for Town Manager/Attorney Action

      1. Date of BOC Meeting
      2. Agenda Item #
      3. Issue:
      4. Request to:
      5. Motion:
      6. Action Requested:
      7. Vote Tally:
      8. Proposed Deadline:

If an agenda item owner anticipates a BOC decision could lead to a work request (e.g., ordinance or policy change, plan of action presentation, request for an outside study, etc.), the agenda item owner would submit a form for the meeting packet with items 1 and 3 already completed and possibly a proposal for what they think the action could be and who the request will be made to (to be finalized after discussion and vote);Items 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 can be completed by the town clerk or BOC executive secretary following discussion and vote. The form would become part of the meeting minutes.

Pat explained again that this was simply a proposal. She said that it was being put out there for review and feedback. The gist of her position is for them to clarify: What exactly are we asking for? The action is to develop a specific ask so it can be properly actioned.

No decision was made – No action taken

Update –
Pat explained that this was just a second reading of her proposal and it was being put out there for review and feedback. They have not received any feedback yet. Next month it will be issued as an administrative document adopted by resolution, not an ordinance.

No decision was made – No action taken


14. Discussion and Possible Action on Proposed Town of Holden Beach Resolution 19-07, Resolution Regarding NCDEQ Issuance of National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits to CPI – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Agenda Packet –
RESOLUTION 19-07
RESOLUTION REGARDING NCDEQ ISSUANCE OF NATIONAL POLLUTANT DISCHARGE ELIMINATION SYSTEM (NPDES) PERMITS TO CPI

LET IT BE KNOWN THAT:

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach, NC is a barrier island community located in Brunswick County; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach barrier island is a west to east oriented island, bounded by the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW) on the north, the Atlantic Ocean on the south facing the Long Bay region of Brunswick County, the Shallotte Inlet to the west and the Lockwood Folly (LWF) Inlet to the east; and

WHEREAS, Oak Island is a west to east oriented barrier island bounded by the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW) on the north, the Atlantic Ocean on the south facing the Long Bay region of Brunswick County, the LWF Inlet to the west and the mouth of the Cape Fear river to the east; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Caswell Beach is located near the mouth of the Cape Fear River, occupying the east end of Oak Island in Brunswick County; and

WHEREAS, CPI USA North Carolina LLC (CPI), a cogeneration power plant located at 1281 Powerhouse Drive, Southport NC, burns a mixture of coal, wood, and used tires to generate steam and electricity for sale; and

WHEREAS, all wastewater and stormwater discharge from CPI goes to the effluent channel used by Duke Energy Progress at their Southport power station, which discharges into the Atlantic Ocean approximately 2000 feet offshore of Caswell Beach; and

WHEREAS, CPI has applied to North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality (NCDEQ) for a renewal of its National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for wastewater (Draft Permit NC0065099) and stormwater (Draft Permit NCS000348); and

WHEREAS, NCDEQ has issued draft permits with conditions that would allow increased volume of permitted discharges from the site.

FURTHERMORE, LET IT BE KNOWN THAT:

WHEREAS, given the uncertain makeup of the CPI burn mixture, a consistent waste stream is difficult to envision; and

WHEREAS, bottom ash transport water and stormwater have been added to the allowed discharge; and

WHEREAS, longer term historical data on the specific components and their concentrations in various CPI discharges does not appear readily available on the NCDEQ website for the permit applications; and

WHEREAS, NCDEQ states that “compliance with the limitations for 126 Priority Pollutants shall be determined by engineering calculations which demonstrated that the regulated pollutants are not detectable in the final discharge by analytical methods in 40 CFR part 136 (in accord with 40 CFR 423.23 (d)(3))”; and

WHEREAS, given the uncertainties, monitoring frequency of once per permit cycle, i.e., once in 5 years, for Priority Pollutants of concern does not appear adequate; and

WHEREAS, given the uncertainties, quarterly monitoring frequency of pollutants of concern, which include copper and chromium, does not appear adequate; and

WHEREAS, said proposed CPI discharges have the potential to adversely impact ocean water and onshore and offshore sand quality, with potential safety ramifications for local and migratory marine species as well as humans; and

WHEREAS, natural nearshore transport of sand via littoral drift occurs from east to west in Long Bay; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach receives shoreline sand from the east to west littoral drift and increasingly relies on offshore sand dredging for beach re-nourishment; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach relies on its reputation as a safe and pristine beach community to attract tourism, the main economic driver for the town.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach that, in the best interest of environmental and public safety of the public in general, the Town of Holden Beach and other Brunswick County beach communities, the NC DEQ, before issuing a final permit, shall make available to the public all modelling, existing individual component historical monitoring data, and risk assessments, whether provided by CPI or performed  by NCDEQ or other scientifically  qualified entities, which can be  used to understand the level of risk associated with the proposed discharge streams.

BE IT ALSO RESOLVED that before any decision is taken by NCDEQ on granting the two permits in question to CPI, additional public hearings shall be held and an additional period of public comment on the applications and proposed/draft permits shall be offered.

Update –
Pat’s takeaway from the meeting was that they did not provide sufficient information, justification or clarity to explain approving the discharge permit.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


Environmental concerns raised over Brunswick’s delayed RO discharge permit
A host of environmental groups are raising concerns about Brunswick County’s draft National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit that would allow the release of reverse osmosis discharge containing an unknown makeup of emerging contaminants in the Cape Fear River. In a letter to regulators, the Southern Environmental Law Center on behalf of eight environmental advocacy groups both compliments and criticizes Brunswick County and the Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). The groups say both the county and regulators can and should do more to ensure the discharge is safe and limits the release of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). The letter claims both the county and DEQ have violated the Clean Water Act in the permitting process; the county violated the act by not disclosing PFAS concentrations in its permit application; the DEQ violated it by failing to ensure toxic substance standards required of Class C waters are met, according to the letter.

System failures
Brunswick County’s $90 million low-pressure reverse osmosis (RO) treatment solution to the emerging contaminants identified in the Cape Fear River involves enhancements to its conventional treatment system at the Northwest Water Treatment Plant. This solution is a “necessary response” to system failures, the letter states. These failures include the private sector’s failure to control discharge of emerging contaminants into the Cape Fear River and the DEQ’s failure in the permitting process to identify and control PFAS discharges, the environmental groups conclude. Brunswick County would be required to sample 28 PFAS on a semiannual basis, according to the draft permit. This monitoring requirement, among others, are “simply inadequate,” the letter states. PFAS are known to vary wildly in sampling data, so a monthly monitoring requirement would more accurately characterize PFAS concentrations, the groups say. “If Brunswick were to discharge undisclosed PFAS, it would violate the Clean Water Act. Moreover, because of this omission, DEQ does not have the information it needs to make a fully informed decision to issue the permit and the public does not have adequate information to meaningfully comment on it,” the letter states. By allowing Brunswick County to release PFAS — without explicitly listing concentrations on the discharge permit — the DEQ is repeating the same mistakes that contributed to the region’s water crisis, according to SELC attorney Geoffrey Gisler. Gisler, who co-wrote the letter to regulators, said the Clean Water Act clearly empowers the DEQ to require permitted dischargers to disclose what they’re discharging. The burden of responsibility to study the PFAS makeup in the discharge falls on the county, Gisler said. Once the concentrations are known, the onus is on the state, according to Gisler, to evaluation and require pollution-control measures to limit PFAS discharges. “That analysis needs to be done and made public,” Gisler said.

Diluted backwash
Research shows the RO treatment process can remove nearly all per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from raw water, however, the technology inevitably includes discharging approximately one-fifth of the amount of water processed as backwash. The release of the discharge concentrate solution into public surface waters must be permitted. In a draft NPDES permit issued Oct. 31, DEQ would allow Brunswick County to release up to 5 million gallons a day (mgd) of RO backwash from a new discharge pipeline into the Cape Fear River. This discharge would serve as point source pollution, Gisler said. “Point source is anything that collects water pollution and dumps it into a river,” he said. “This is certainly a point source that is polluting.” The SELC points to Cape Fear Public Utilities’ (CFPUA) decision to install Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) at its water treatment facility, the Sweeney Water Treatment Plant. Like RO, GAC can remove nearly all PFAS from raw water. Unlike RO, GAC captures contaminants in filters that can be burned and recycled or disposed of in a landfill. Before opting to move ahead with RO in May 2018, Brunswick County’s consultant studied GAC as a treatment solution but in its final recommendation, concluded RO was the best fit. Asked if SELC was proposing that Brunswick County install a GAC filter to reduce contaminant concentration in its RO backwash, Gisler said stakeholders should go where the research leads. “We don’t know where the analysis ends up,” Gisler said. “What we’re saying is we know these technologies are out there.”

Permit pending, project delayed
In a statement, Brunswick County maintains it has been transparent with regulators throughout the permitting process regarding PFAS. The county’s proposed RO discharge will not add any additional PFAS into the Cape Fear River, the county affirms. “Throughout the many meetings and telephone conversations regarding the project’s NPDES permit, DEQ staff have been made fully aware that the key water quality goal of this project is to remove PFAS contaminants from the County’s drinking water that cannot be removed through conventional treatment methods,” Brunswick County’s spokesperson provided in a statement (read the full statement at the bottom of this article). Raw water treated at the Northwest Water Treatment Plant is sourced from Kings Bluff in Riegelwood, 13 miles upstream. Brunswick County’s RO plans include constructing a new 4-mile concentrate discharge pipeline that would cross under Mt. Misery Road and release backwash into the Cape Fear River. Sarah Young, a DEQ spokesperson, could not immediately provide a response to SELC’s conclusions. Young confirmed Brunswick County’s draft NPDES permit is still pending with a decision due in early March 2020. DEQ staff are reviewing all comments received, Young said, which could inform changes to the permit prior to its possible issuance.

Meanwhile, the project itself is behind schedule. In a notice to prospective bidders in late November, the county delayed its bid due dates by three months. Bids for both the concentrate pipeline project and plant treatment enhancements are due in March 2020. This delay was caused by DEQ’s adjusted permit review process, the county said in a statement, and feedback from contractors who raised concerns about the tight project timeline. Pre-bidding documents revealed the county was still considering a no-RO upgrade solution as one of 10 alternatives being bid; while the county has consistently stated it is committed to an RO solution, this alternative is still on the table given three uncertainties shared with inquiring contractors: bid price, project budget, and status of the NPDES permit.

Read Brunswick County’s full response below:
“Brunswick County reaffirms that providing clean, reliable and affordable drinking water to our residents and customers is of paramount importance to our county leadership and the Public Utilities team. Brunswick County is planning to install one of the most effective, proven technologies for the removal of both regulated and unregulated contaminants that is protective of human health and resilient to contaminant spikes in the Cape Fear River source water. Brunswick County has been transparent with DEQ and the public regarding the advanced low-pressure reverse osmosis system NPDES permit, the contents of the discharge, and the fact that the process will remove almost all PFAS from customer’s drinking water; the County has also been transparent to DEQ that no additional PFAS will be added to the discharge through the treatment process before being returned to the original water source from which it was taken. Throughout the many meetings and telephone conversations regarding the project’s NPDES permit, DEQ staff have been made fully aware that the key water quality goal of this project is to remove PFAS contaminants from the County’s drinking water that cannot be removed through conventional treatment methods. We appreciate DEQ’s consideration in issuing an NPDES permit for the proposed advanced low-pressure reverse osmosis system and will continue to work with the department and other interested parties throughout the process. The conditions of the permit will require the County to continue monitoring for PFAS and other contaminants, and it includes a means to implement discharge limits in the future if necessary.”

Read SELC’s full comments on the NPDES permit below:
2019-12-05 SELC Comments  by Johanna Ferebee Still on Scribd

Read more » click here 


15. Town Manager’s Report

FEMA / Storm Events
The Town is currently working reimbursements from five (5) federally declared storms simultaneously. Each of the five (5) projects are treated separately, we may be able to achieve economies of scale if we can combine them. We will be going through the bid process for the estimated $25 million in sand reimbursements.  The Dorian declaration raises the total up to $30 million if it is added into the mix. Because of our experience working with FEMA we are serving as a guinea pig; reimbursement will be through new digital FEMA Grants Portal.

Florence / Michael
FloMike hurricane project funds have been awarded
Florence – federal and state $15,861,220
Michael – federal and state $8,547,505
FloMike total Cat G beach nourishment funding is $24,408,725

Dorian
Federal declaration was made for Hurricane Dorian that includes coastal communities in Brunswick County. Town has estimated approximately $4.5 million for Cat G FEMA reimbursements. 

Matthew / Irene
Revisions made and submitted, still have @$300,000 on the table

Grants OK’d for Emerald Isle, Holden Beach
North Carolina and Federal Emergency Management Agency officials announced Thursday more than $54.9 million in hurricane- and tropical storm-related public assistance grants have been approved for Emerald Isle and Holden Beach. The grants are to reimburse expenses to renourish public beaches in the coastal towns which were damaged by storm surges during Hurricane Florence and Tropical Storm Michael in 2018. Emerald Isle is to replenish with more than 2 million cubic yards of sand and more than 377,000 square yards of plants damaged during Hurricane Florence. The sand equals more than 20 times the amount of concrete in Charlotte’s Bank of America Stadium and the volume of plants covers 78 acres, according to the announcement. Holden Beach will replenish more than 389,000 cubic yards of sand damaged during Tropical Storm Michael. FEMA’s Public Assistance program provides grants for state and local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations to reimburse the cost of debris removal, emergency protective measures and permanent repair work. Public Assistance is a cost-sharing program. FEMA reimburses applicants at least 75% of eligible costs, and the remaining 25% is covered by the state. The federal share is paid directly to the state, which disburses funds to agencies, local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations that incurred costs. FEMA’s combined share for the Emerald Isle and Holden Beach projects is more than $41.2 million and the state’s share is more than $13.7 million.

The state and FEMA have approved more than $72 million to restore North Carolina beaches since the 2018 storms.
Read more » click here

FEMA announces reimbursements for Holden Beach, Wilmington
FEMA and the State of North Carolina announced the reimbursement of millions of dollars Wednesday for Holden Beach and Wilmington. According to a news release, more than $15.8 million will go toward reimbursing expenses spent to restore storm-related beach damage. Those funds include the reimbursement of beach sand in Holden Beach. “Holden Beach will replenish with more than 722,000 cubic yards of sand and more than 2,500 square yards of plants damaged during Hurricane Florence,” FEMA said in the release. “The sand equals more than seven times the amount of concrete in Charlotte’s Bank of America Stadium.” Earlier this month, Holden Beach was approved for a reimbursement of $8.5 million for Tropical-Storm Michael-related beach damage. FEMA and state officials also approved an additional $3 million to reimburse the City of Wilmington for debris removal following Hurricane Florence.This latest amount brings the total to more than $20.5 million to reimburse the city’s debris removal expenses. “More than 1.3 million cubic yards of hurricane-related vegetation — enough to fill more than 6,700 train boxcars — was collected in Wilmington,” FEMA stated in a news release. “Funds for this project cover work completed from Sept. 20, 2018, through Feb. 23, 2019.”
Read more » click here

Topsail Beach, Holden Beach receive more storm restoration funding
The State of North Carolina and FEMA on Wednesday announced more than $30 million total headed to Southeastern North Carolina beach towns from hurricane- and storm-related damage. In all, beaches in New Hanover, Pender and Brunswick counties suffered more than $119 million in damage from Florence, and that doesn’t include previous issues, or problems that surfaced during Hurricane Dorian in September 2019. The town of Holden Beach is receiving $15.8 million, and that money is expected to be used to help replenish more than 722,000 cubic yards of sand and more than 2,500 square yards of plants damaged during Florence, according to a press release. The recent funding is in addition to $8.5 million approved earlier this month for Tropical Storm Michael-related beach damage. In addition, $18.8 million will be given to the Town of Topsail Beach for its damages from Florence. It is expected to replenish more than 939,000 cubic yards of sand damaged or lost during that storm. The town recently started a $24.6 million project for dredging and beach renourishment. These funding packages are part of FEMA’s Public Assistance program, which provides grants for state and local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations to reimburse the cost of debris removal, emergency protective measures and permanent repair work. Public Assistance is a cost-sharing program. FEMA reimburses applicants at least 75 percent of eligible costs, and the remaining 25 percent is covered by the state. The federal share is paid directly to the state, which disburses funds to agencies, local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations that incurred costs. In all, more than $107 million has been approved to restore North Carolina Beaches since the 2018 storms.
Read more » click here

Holden Beach gets more than $15.8M to restore coastline
The State of North Carolina and FEMA have approved more than $15.8 million to reimburse expenses to restore hurricane and tropical storm related beach damage. The funds include reimbursing the replacement of beach sand in the Town of Holden Beach. Storm surges from Hurricane Florence damaged the coastal community’s beach. Holden Beach will replenish with more than 722,000 cubic yards of sand and more than 2,500 square yards of plants damaged during Hurricane Florence. The sand equals more than seven times the amount of concrete in Charlotte’s Bank of America Stadium. The recent funding for Holden Beach is in addition to $8.5 million approved earlier this month for Tropical Storm Michael-related beach damage. FEMA’s Public Assistance program provides grants for state and local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations to reimburse the cost of debris removal, emergency protective measures and permanent repair work. Public Assistance is a cost-sharing program. FEMA reimburses applicants at least 75 percent of eligible costs, and the remaining 25 percent is covered by the state. The federal share is paid directly to the state, which disburses funds to agencies, local governments and certain private nonprofit organizations that incurred costs. FEMA’s share for the latest Holden Beach project is more than $11.8 million and the state’s share is more than $3.9 million. More than $107 million has been approved to restore North Carolina beaches since the 2018 storms. In addition to Holden Beach, the towns of Emerald Isle, Indian Beach, Pine Knoll Shores and Topsail Beach have been approved for beach restoration funding.
Read more » click here


LWF Bend Widener Navigation Maintenance Project
The LWF inlet crossing maintenance project is underway with dredging operations by Goodloe Marine. Shore pipe is in place on the beach near tip of the island. Expect operations through early January; nighttime operations are probable. Production estimates for beach fill are 7000 yds per day but dredge has never done this job. Goodloe has only had it 4-5 months.  Total quantity estimated at over 200,000 cy. With placement volumes being significantly less.

Beach Nourishment
The sand search continues.  The hydrography survey and vibracores have been completed. However, we were told that an archeological side beam scan is required, which will be done over the next few weeks, before we can submit for permit modification.  Offshore investigation is moving forward and is on schedule.

Budget Ordinance 19-18
Last month BOC’s approved $30,000

  • $4,600 for the LWF maintenance dredging project
  • $25,400 for surveying and engineering services

Administrative error required him to move funds to proper account

Previously reported – November 2019
The County is asking us to pay $37,476, the local portion for the dredging project
Ordinance 19-18 is transferring just $4,600, that leaves a $32,876 shortfall
We previously budgeted $33,000 for one dredge event for this year
There just isn’t enough money in the budget to cover the entire request from the county
They are transferring $4,600 which increases the dredging line item to $37,600  

Amendment was made based on FEMA requirement change that they were informed about this morning. Apparently, FEMA is requiring additional surveys for Dorian to go to depth of closure. This will require not only the survey work but additional analysis from ATM. The staff therefore recommends amending budget ordinance from $4,600 to a total of $30,000. This budgets $4,600 for the LWF maintenance dredging project and $25,400 for surveying and engineering services.

Depth of closure (DOC) is an important concept used in coastal engineering. The DOC is a theoretical depth along a beach profile where sediment transport is very small or non-existent, dependent on wave height and period, and occasionally, sediment grain size.

Moved funds of $30,000
From Revenue account #50.0398.0300 to Expense account#50.0710.7200

Audit
Received and approved by LGC

BEMC
They notified us of a rate hike, scheduled with effective date of April 2020
This is
the first-rate hike in ten (10) years
It will impact our budget, primarily sewer utility bills
This will need to be addressed during the budget process

Lift Station #3
Lift Station #3 is progressing as follows:
Advertise for Bids          10/24/19          done
Mandatory Pre-Bids      12/10/19          done
Receive Bids                    12/19/19
Contract Award             01/21/20
Construction Start        03/23/20
Closeout                          12/31/20

Walkway
Public beach access at 289.5 OBW is under construction

Previously reported – February 2019
Governor Roy Cooper announced that Holden Beach was awarded a public access grant for $16,335 for the construction of a beach access walkway at 289.5 OBW 

Holden Beach Bridge Repairs
Previously reported – October 2019
The work on the bridge will not be finished until at least March of 2020 due to the decorative guard rail we selected.
Contract was awarded October 29, 2018 with the completion date for the contract to be October1, 2019

16. Mayor’s Comments

From the Mayor’s Desk
Inlet Hazard Area Changes
The Coastal Resources Commission is in the process of developing new rules that have the potential to greatly impact several hundred lots at Holden Beach. Please review the information below for an executive summary prepared by the Business Alliance for a Sound Economy (NCBASE) complete with details of the rules, dates/times of public hearings, maps of properties affected and contact information for those needing to receive feedback on the proposed changes.

Please take the time to review, attend the hearings if possible and provide your comments/concerns.

Information from NCBASE:
The NC Division of Coastal Management is holding public hearings and accepting feedback regarding the proposed changes to the Inlet Hazard Areas (IHA). The proposal put forth will 1) greatly expand inlet hazard areas as well as 2) significantly change in the way that setbacks are measured in these areas. If approved by the Coastal Resources Commission, this proposal will impact thousands of acres of coastal land and thousands of parcels and structures in our region.

The proposed rules can be found in the attached document (click here) on pages 16. On pages 6 – 7, you can see the breakdown (structure, acres) by community.

Here are some additional links to resources related to the IHA update:

Please review the new maps and new rules. Then make plans to attend the public hearings and make your voice heard.

Public Hearings and Comment Period:
Public hearings start on December 17, 2019 in Brunswick County and will be held in a number of coastal locations through mid-January. The full schedule is at the end of this document. Written comments, questions and feedback will also be accepted. Provide written comments, questions and feedback via email to DCM Director Braxton Davis (braxton.davis@ncdenr.gov) and/or Ken Richardson (ken.richardson@ncdenr.gov).

Comments will be accepted through January 31, 2020. Depending on breadth of comments, the issue could go to the Coastal Resources Commission at the February 2020 meeting and have an implementation date of April or May 2020.

Over the same period, the state of North Carolina and individual communities have continued to proactively advance coastal management strategies including the creation of a shallow draft inlet fund, the permitting of terminal groins and investment in continued coastal storm damage reduction projects to enhance our coastal infrastructure.

Concerns:

  • The impacts of the expanded Inlet Hazard Areas and revised setback calculations will be widespread and significant.
    • Has DCM notified property owners that will be in the expanded Inlet Hazard Area?
    • Has DCM notified property owners in the current Inlet Hazard Area that the setback factors are changing?
  • The Proposed IHA Rule Changes and new setback calculations could result in a taking of private property if they completely prevent development of a parcel. For example, if a lot is 150′ deep and its setback goes from 60′ to 240′-it is unbuildable.

The Proposed IHA Rule Changes may increase the CRC’s exposure to takings claims. Such claims may arise because the Proposed IHA Rule Changes and setbacks would prohibit development within areas in which development is not currently prohibited. They may also arise where property owners who acquired or held their property with the expectation of being able to develop at a certain intensity are not satisfied with the limited development potential that the Proposed IHA Rule Changes would permit in protected IHAs

  • The grandfathering provisions need to be expanded. The grandfathering protection the CRC Memo says would apply to all lots under 15,000 sq.ft. is not actually included in the Proposed IHA Rule Changes.

The CRC Memo states that the Proposed IHA Rule Changes include provisions to grandfather all existing structures within the new IHAs as well as all lots under 15,000 square feet, platted after July 23, 1984 or before the effective date of the Proposed IHA Rule Changes, with respect to density restrictions. However, there is no language in the Proposed IHA Rule Changes that expressly grandfathers such lots.

  • The cumulative effect of the Proposed IHA Rule Changes is to make an additional 1,819.7 acres of coastal land subject to development restrictions-in addition to expanding restrictions on existing parcels in the IHA. This will impact property values in a range of affected communities.
  • The Proposed IHA Rule Changes imply a causal connection between the size of a structure, the number of units in a structure, and the size of a lot and the risk of erosion, flooding, and other adverse effects of sand, wind and water associated with dynamic ocean inlets. It is unclear, however, how the size of a home, the number of units, or size of a lot has any causal relationship to the risk of realizing hazards associated with dynamic ocean inlets.
  • The revised rules will negatively impact property values and complicate potential sales and financing as a result of the “new” nonconforming status of the structures and parcels identified in the CRC Memo. To help alleviate the concern about making existing structures nonconforming, CRC could include a provision in the Proposed IHA Rule Changes that would allow for reconstruction of nonconforming structures and structures on nonconforming lots without the need to come into compliance with current rules.
    • Table 3 of the CRC Memo shows that, under the Proposed IHA Rule Changes, the number of lots within IHAs that do not meet the 15,000 square feet minimum lot size requirement more than doubles, from 894 lots to 1,805 lots.
    • Similarly, Table 2 of the CRC Memo shows that, overall, the Proposed IHA Rule Changes would increase the number of structures with heated area greater than 5,000 square feet within or intersecting IHA boundaries from 24 to 41. Under the Proposed IHA Rule Changes, all such structures would be non-conforming with respect to the proposed maximum floor area allowance.

Public Hearing Schedule / Inlet Hazard Area Update

Brunswick County December 17, 2019 10:00 a.m.
Brunswick County Government Complex
30 Government Center Drive, NE
Bolivia, NC 28422

New Hanover County December 17, 2019 3:00 p.m.
New Hanover County Government Center
230 Government Center Drive
Wilmington, NC 28403

Onslow County December 18, 2019 10:00 a.m.
Sneads Ferry Library
1330 Highway 210
Sneads Ferry, NC 28460

Pender County December 18, 2019 3:00 p.m.
Assembly Building
720 Channel Blvd.
Topsail Beach, NC 28445

Carteret County January 7, 2020 3:00 p.m.
NCDCM
400 Commerce Avenue
Morehead City, NC 28557

Hyde County January 8, 2020 10:00 a.m.
Community Center – Multipurpose Room
30 Oyster Creek Road
Swan Quarter, NC 27885
*broadcast simultaneously to Ocracoke Island:

Ocracoke Community Center
999 Irvin Garrish Highway
Ocracoke, NC 27960

Dare County January 14, 2020 11:00 a.m.
Town of Nags Head
Board of Commissioners Room
5401 S. Croatan Highway
Nags Head, NC 27959


Receipt of Inlet and Beach Protection Board Report

Previously reported –
Ordinance 18-02 established the Inlet and Beach Protection Board
The Ordinance requires a written report from this Board

Agenda Packet –
November IBPB Meeting Update

The Inlet and Beach Protection Board (IBPB) met November 21and the following issues and topics were discussed and addressed:

Status of the Beach and Inlets:  Staff provided an overview of current and future projects, efforts and conditions, and issues relative to the beach strand and inlets. Highlights include:

    • CRR FEMA Reimbursement: The status of the $25,000,000 FEMA Florence and Michael remediation project, now known as the Central Reach Reimbursement Project, (CRR Project) was discussed. The approved project worksheets needed before work can start have cleared Environmental review and are now in the Office of Legislative Affairs, pending release.
    • Sand Search: The sand sourcing needed for the FEMA/CRR project is moving forward. All borings have been taken and are being analyzed. Next up is an archeological assessment and a check for hard bottom. The area targeted is SSE of the Lockwood Folly Inlet.
    • Hurricane Dorian: The Scoping meeting with the state has been completed and these numbers have been transmitted to FEMA. We have been notified that additional survey information to depth of closure will be needed. The Town has been complimented on their efforts to get numbers in to FEMA in a timely fashion and the staff’s ability to engage with expertise in navigating the portal.
    • LWFIX and Bend Widener: The pending projects were detailed and discussed. The Corps had previously confirmed that a dredging project would occur this winter and place approximately 135,000cy of material from the bend widener and80,000cy from the LWFIX on the East End and funds were secured from the Town, County and the State which were forwarded to the Corps. The proposed schedule for work will be late November to late December. While we are excited about sand being added to the system, the downside is possible sand loss due to winter storms. Sand fence will be placed after the project completes. Sand fence is critical with this project due to the quantity of fines.
    • Lockwood Folly Dredging: The inlet is experiencing shoaling from Hurricane Dorian. The Town will be participating in a County/State partnership initiated by the Corps to dredge the outer bar using the Merritt side-caster dredge to clear the inlet. The Town will be contributing 25% of the local share. The Merritt is expected to begin work November 22. The budget amendment to fund the work was approved on November 19.
    • Corps Engagement: The GRR/50 Year Plan/15 Year Plan Study and the separate 1966 Dune and Berm Construction Projects precipitated from the Wilmington District of the Corps of Engineers and the lobbyist’s efforts were touched on. A decision from the Corps was anticipated by the end of August, but the decision is still pending.
    • UNCW Collaboration: Representatives from UNCW have presented a contract and scope of work to begin working on the vegetation study and the inlet changes document. Town Staff is ready to move ahead.
    • Annual Beach Monitoring Report: The annual Beach Monitoring Report was presented at the October BOC meeting. It is being reviewed by Town staff.
    • Other Updates: “Keep Off the Dunes” signs, which were approved in the adopted budget have been ordered. Mats will be ordered this winter. Steve Mercer, of Coastal Transplants, has been harvesting Sea Oat seeds. The IBPB received a hardcopy of the Oceanfront and Inlet Management Plan dated October 2019.

Meeting Updates:

    • Brunswick County Shoreline Protection: The IBPB was represented at the meetingOctober 2,2019. The next scheduled meeting will be in January.
    • ASBPA: Members, Commissioners and Staff attended the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association (ASBPA) National Meeting October 22-25 in Myrtle Beach. Town Manager Hewett, Assistant Town Manager Ferguson and the Town’s engineer, Fran Way of ATM presented on the Central Reach Project at the conference. The presentation was well received.
    • Quarterly MOA: IBPB members, Staff and a Commissioner attended or dialed in to the quarterly MOA meeting in New Bern. The bid for this winter’s dredging of the Lockwood Folly Crossing and Bend Widener has been awarded. This project would place “‘215Kcy of material on the east end of the beach. The side-caster dredge Merritt will be in the inlet this month to alleviate shoaling from Hurricane Dorian. The local portion of the cost will be split SO% County, 25% Oak Island and 25% Holden Beach.
    • NCBIWA: IBPB members, the Mayor and Staff also attended the NC Beach, Inlets and Waterway Association’s Annual Meeting in Wrightsville Beach November 12, 13.

The Board’s next meeting will be December 19, a week earlier due to the Christmas holiday.


General Comments –

Commissioner Fletcher – was not in attendance
Commissioner-Elect Murdockwas not in attendance

Light refreshments were provided at the conclusion of the meeting.

There were forty-seven (47) members of the community in attendance
Average attendance at meetings for 2019 was twenty-four (24)
¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Maybe we should serve refreshments at all the meetings

The BOC’s January Regular Meeting is scheduled on the third Tuesday of the month, January 21st


Loose Ends –

      • Development Fees                                                             June 2018      
      • Poyner Spruill Consulting Services Contract               December 2018
      • Commercial District                                                         February 2019
      • Vacuum Sewer System Station #3                                  June 2019
      • MAPS / Pay Study                                                             September 2019         
      • Land Use Plan                                                                   October 2019             
      • Parking                                                                               October 2019             
      • Mega-Houses                                                                     October 2019 
      • Audit Remedial Policies & Procedures                          November 2019         

Budget Season –
Every year we talk about starting the budget process earlier.
Every year it wasn’t moved up in any meaningful way.
Every year the Board is still not really working on the budget until the eleventh hour.
I am disappointed that we have not even established the budget meeting schedule yet.

Budget Calendar –
Local governments must balance their budget by a combination of the following:
.     1.
Raising taxes
.     2.
Cutting spending
.     3.
Operating more efficiently

The Town Manager’s proposed budget is due by June 1st
Commissioners must adopt budget no later than June 30th for the next fiscal year

Adopting the annual budget is a primary responsibility of the Board.

This is what I’d like to see the budget process look like starting in January –
.     1.
Monthly Meetings / Workshops
.     2.
Board Goals
.     3.
Review Capital Improvement Plan
.     4.
Staff presentations – wants / needs / revenue streams / cost cutting measures
.     5.
Review Towns current level of services provided – change /add / delete
.     6.
Review staffing and compensation package
.     7.
Line by line review of the budget
.     8.
Appropriate funds for the following:
.        
Beach Nourishment
.        • Dredging
.        
Infrastructure Reserves – Water System / Sewer System / Roads & Sidewalks



I respectfully submit My Xmas List

These are the items I would most like to see addressed this year.
    1.
Beach – Strand / Inlet / Groin
.       a)
Select an East End nourishment project strategy
.       b)
Support LWF Inlet waterway maintenance projects, keeping inlet navigable
.       c)
Work together on beach protection issues with surrounding communities
      d)
Increase Beach Strand Ordinance Compliance & Enforcement
.       e)
Expand Beach Ranger Program by having it cover shoulder tourist season too
.    2.
Parking
.       a)
Develop plans for a promenade on Jordan Boulevard
      b)
Utilize acquired properties for additional parking
.       c)
Prohibit right-of-way parking
.   3.
Trash Services
.       a)
Offer a suite of services
      b)
Charge a user fee for those that want the service
.       c)
Make policies both fair and consistent
.   4)
Community Rating System
      a) I
mprove rating so flood insurance rates are discounted


Lou’s Views –
The views expressed here are simply my opinion based on the facts as I understand them.  I have no hidden agenda, no ax to grind, or any political ambition.  I’m simply attempting to keep the community informed on what actually is going on here. I just tell it like it is and that is why people read the newsletter.  After all it is called “Lou’s Views”!  I welcome updates, clarifications or a correction to any fact I have stated which have changed or was inadvertently stated incorrectly.


Website policy –
We have had a number of inquiries lately about our website policies. We do not have an official policy per se. In general, we do not accept paid ads, associates or links for our website. Approved Vendor List as well as Advertisement – not paid for is based on my personal experience as a homeowner and as a property manager here on Holden Beach.  Associates are simply personal friends that have a local business. Links are to websites that provide information that are of public significance. We invite you to share with us anything that you feel our readers would want to know too. We hope you find our website useful.


Request – 
We encourage you to pass along this newsletter to anyone else you think would enjoy it. We would like to include other members of the community and are asking for your help in making that happen. To be added to our distribution list send an e-mail to hbpoin@ec.rr.com or subscribe on our website https://lousviews.com.

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Then please forward it to a friend!


Disclaimer –
.   1) Not official correspondence from the Town
.   2)
Not affiliated with Holden Beach Property Owners Association


Wishing you and yours a Happy Holiday!


HBPOIN – Lou’s Views
.          • Gather and disseminate information
.           • Identify the issues and determine how they affect you
.           • Act as a watchdog
.           • Grass roots monthly newsletter since 2008

https://lousviews.com/