01 – Town Meeting

Lou’s Views

“Unofficial” Minutes & Comments


Inlet Hazard Area Workshop 01/16/20

The state Division of Coastal Management held a workshop for the Town of Holden Beach to review proposed Inlet Hazard Area boundary updates and associated Coastal Resources Commission rule amendments.

Ken Richardson –NC Division of Coastal Management

“At a Glance”
. 1. Boundary: Updated Inlet Hazard Areas
. 2.
Rule: All structures treated equally
.
Structure size: 5,000 sq. ft.
.
Density: 1 unit per 15,000 sq. ft. of land
. 3.
Rule: setback based on inlet erosion rates
. 4.
Rule: Grandfathering rules still apply

Review presentation » click here

IHA Takeaways:

  1. CRC’s Science Panel on Coastal Hazards used methodology which involve possibilities, not certainties.
  2. They seem convinced that the west end will have serious erosion issues that are influenced by the inlet
  3. The IHA is based on the worst-case scenario
  4. One has to ask: What is happening in the inlet, other than that OIB is building a terminal groin there?
  5. THB is penalized for the west end accretion in model based on a standard deviation formula
  6. Realtors and contractors both felt very strongly that this designation would be like a Scarlett Letter
  7. The change could have a significant negative impact for the entire island
  8. The word HAZARD paints too negative a picture, they should consider a change to use RISK instead
  9. Ken requested and wants community input and it would carry more weight coming from the Town
  10. He recommended that the THB send them something summarizing the communities comments
  11. The comment period closes on January 31st

There were eighty-seven (87) members of the community in attendance



Breaking News
Public Comment period on the proposed rulemaking to update IHA has been extended to March 2nd
.


BOC’s Special Meeting 01/17/20

Draft Land Use Plan » click here

Audio Recording » click here


1. Discussion on Draft Land Use Plan

Previously reported – September 2019
Land Use Plan
For more information » click here

HBPOA
What is the Land Use Plan?
“Holden Beach’s Land Use Plan provides guidance to local decision-makers seeking to achieve the community’s long-term vision. This process allows public officials, staff, and other stakeholders to be proactive rather than reactive in maintaining Holden Beach’s status as one of the finest family oriented coastal communities on the East Coast of the United States. This plan builds on the previous land use plans prepared by Holden Beach in 1980, 1985, 1990, 1997, and 2009. It encompasses all geographic areas in the community; considering issues of future land use, development, and natural resource protection. The plan is long-range in nature and looks beyond current issues to address potential future land use and environmental issues over the next 10 to 15 years and beyond.”   

Previously reported – October 2019
Agenda Packet –
As the Board of Commissioners are aware, the Land Use Plan Committee completed their work as commissioned by the Board of Commissioners. The LUP was then sent to the Holden Beach Planning and Zoning Board where a public hearing was held. The P&Z Board approved sending the completed document for review.

The P&Z Board requested that another public hearing be set before the Board of Commissioners’ meeting. They erred in this request, as only the Board of Commissioners can set their public hearings. While a second public hearing is not necessary at this time, the Board may request such if they feel the need arises.

The P&Z Board provided three recommendations:
  1.
Accept the Document and send it forward to DEQ for staff review.
.   2.
Send the Document Back to the LUP Committee with changes.
.   3.
Amend the document.

* If the document is amended any amendments will need to be reviewed by Wes McLeod and staff for compliance with the 7B statutory requirements.

It is important to understand that while the document is a guideline and a mirror of the community’s philosophies, it is not a regulatory document. It is basically a comprehensive guideline to show that the town’s future is directed towards those ideals as set forth in the Statutes.

Wes explained the procedure to get this plan adopted. It has been recommended for approval by both Boards that worked on it (Land Use Plan Committee & Planning and Zoning Board). The statuary process for this to be adopted requires it to be submitted to the Division of Coastal Management (DCM) for completeness review. After that 75-day review process we are still required to have a Public Hearing, after that it can then be adopted by the BOC’s. It then goes back to the DCM for certification.

 A decision was made – Approved unanimously
Only approved submitting proposed Land Use Plan to DCM for their review

Previously reported – December 2019
Board will coordinate their schedules to determine date of meeting

For starters, the plan merely sets guidelines which can be changed as the situation requires. What’s more it is nonbinding. Every land use or zoning decision needs a consistency statement that says whether the recommendation conforms to the LUP or not.   We can recommend something that does not conform if we state why it is in the best interest to do that.  A considerable amount of time and effort were put in to develop this plan. The BOC’s had a chance to give input on the plan, along with the rest of the Town, at the input meetings and at every LUP meeting.  All shareholders were involved in the process and contributed a significant amount of input.  It is a compromise document, no one got everything they wanted in it. Cannot imagine what value the BOC’s think that they can add to what was already submitted.

Update –
No decision was made – No action taken

* If the document is amended any amendments will need to be reviewed by Wes McLeod and staff for compliance with the 7B statutory requirements.


BOC’s Regular Meeting 01/21/20

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet click here

Audio Recording » click here


1. Discussion and Possible Award of Contract for Vacuum Sewer System #3 Upgrade – Green Engineering (Public Works Director Clemmons)
a.
Ordinance 20-01, An Ordinance Amending Ordinance 19-10, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance for Fiscal Year 2019 – 2020 (Amendment No. 7)

Agenda Packet –
T.A. Loving is the recommended  contractor for the lift Station 3 upgrade (Atch 1).

The bid opening was held on December 19th. Three bids were received (Atch 2).

The budget amendment (Atch 3) in the amount of $407,088 is necessary to provide  adequate funding for award of the contract and procurement of the associated Town provided vacuum pumps/equipment (“the skid”) in addition to the System Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) equipment.

If the Board of Commissioners desires to award the contract the Budget Amendment must be approved.

SUGGESTED MOTION:
”To approve the award of the contract for the upgrade of lift Station 3 to T.A. Loving in the amount of $1,622,500 and the associated Budget Amendment 20-01 in the amount of $407,088.”

Previously reported – April 2019
To be clear, this is strictly for engineering services. The Board needs to select a firm based on qualification criteria only; they selected Green Engineering for Sewer System #3 upgrade. Green Engineering will provide all engineering services required to construct a vulnerability reducing structure of Lift Station #3.
The engineer firm is responsible for the design, bid, and construct process. The Board authorized the Town Manager to negotiate a contract with the selected engineering firm.

Previously reported – June 2019
Agenda Packet –
This memo recommends and presents for the Board of Commissioners’ consideration the agreement for structural and mechanical work to sewer lift station #3 as outlined in Alterative #2 of the Holden Beach Sewer Study completed by McGill Associates in April 2017. Work to also include evaluate, design and construction of possible force main interceptor at Ocean Boulevard West and Seagull Street.

Approval of the agreement will provide all engineering services required in the amount of $311,805.

Green Engineering was awarded the $158,000 contract for Sewer System Engineering to Sewer Pump Station Number 4 in December of 2017. Green Engineering was just awarded the $311,805 contract for Sewer System Engineering to Sewer Pump Station Number 3. You may ask yourself: Why is there an additional $153,805 in cost only eighteen (18) months later? The explanation given was that this station is only sixteen (16) feet from adjacent property and will require additional acoustic engineering. Due to the station location it is different from the first project and will have a significant higher cost to build. Leo when asked how much more threw out a 25% more number just as a ballpark figure. Yikes!

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Update –
Predicated budget based on previous sewer system upgrade
Expenses being approved are up and above what was previously budgeted

Moved funds of $407,088
From Revenue account #30.0399.0500 to Expense account#30.0810.7402

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


Green Engineering firm was awarded the contract for engineering services for both sewer system upgrades. T.A. Loving was selected as the contractor for both too.

Sewer Station #4 / $1,958,620 vs. Sewer Station #3 / $2,283,305  
Sewer Station #4 / $158,000 + $1,413,000 + $282,700 +$104,920 =  $1,958,620
Sewer Station #3 / $311,805 + $
349,000
$1,622,500 =  $2,283,305  


2. Police Report – Chief Jeremy Dixon

Police Patch
No news is good news
So far so good, it’s been fairly quiet
We are not experiencing any major crime wave at the moment
.


Reminder that we all serve as the eyes and ears for law enforcement.

If you know something, hear something, or see something –
call 911 and let police deal with it.


Neighborhood Watch

  • Need to look out for each other and report any suspicious activity
  • Call 911 if you see or hear anything suspicious
  • Fill out Keep Check Request Form if you will be out of town
  • Submit completed Property Registration Form
  • Pickup copy of Protecting Your Home

Crime prevention 101 – Don’t make it easy for them
. a) Don’t leave vehicles unlocked
. b)
Don’t leave valuables in your vehicles
. c)
Lock your doors & windows – house, garage, storage areas and sheds

Keep Check Request Form
. a) Complete the form and return it to the Police Department
. b)
Officers check your property in your absence
.
Property Registration Form
. a)
Record of items in your home that have a value of over $100
. b)
Complete the form and return it to the Police Department


3. Discussion and Election of Chairman to the Audit Committee – Town Clerk Finnell

Agenda Packet –
Per Section 30.26 of the Code of Ordinances. the chairman of the Audit Committee shall be elected by the Board at their first regular meeting in January.

In the same section, it states the chairman of the Audit Committee shall make a recommendation to the Board on who shall serve as public members. Based on the recommendation. the Board needs to select two – four public members, whose normal term is one year.

Tony Chavonne, Mark Fleischhauer and Tom Myers; the members who served during the 2019 term are all  interested in serving  another  term.  Their applications are included in the packet, but they are  not scheduled for interviews since they have been interviewed and served on the committee in the past. Jeff Tansill is interested in serving but is out of town and unable to interview for the position. His application is included in your packets. Jeannine Richman and Tom Inzerillo are also interested and are scheduled to be interviewed at the special meeting.

The Board can vote by ballot or verbally to fill the positions. If ballots are used. please make sure to sign your name on the ballot.

Previously reported – January 2018
The Board of Commissioners has found that establishment of an Audit Committee would improve the ability of the Board of Commissioners to perform its fiscal oversight function.

Previously reported – January 2019
§30.26 AUDIT COMMITTEE OF THE BOC
There is hereby established an Audit Committee of the BOC, which shall be comprised of: A Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee, who shall be a member of the Board of Commissioners; and not fewer than two nor more than four Public Members, as determined by the BOC at the first regular meeting in January. The Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee and each of the Public Members shall have a normal term of one year, and all shall serve at the pleasure of the BOC. The Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee shall be elected by the BOC at the first regular meeting in January.

Update –
The Board voted by ballot and selected Woody Tyner for Chairman

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


4. Discussion and Selection of Audit Committee Members – Town Clerk Finnell

Agenda Packet –
Per Section 30.26 of the Code of Ordinances. the chairman of the Audit Committee shall be elected by the Board at their first regular meeting in January.

In the same section, it states the chairman of the Audit Committee shall make a recommendation to the Board on who shall serve as public members. Based on the recommendation, the Board needs to select two – four public members, whose normal term is one year.

Tony Chavonne, Mark Fleischhauer and Tom Myers; the members who served during the 2019 term are all  interested in serving  another  term.  Their applications are included in the packet, but they are  not scheduled for interviews since they have been interviewed and served on the committee in the past. Jeff Tansill is interested in serving but is out of town and unable to interview for the position. His application is included in your packets. Jeannine Richman and Tom Inzerillo are also interested and are scheduled to be interviewed at the special meeting.

The Board can vote by ballot or verbally to fill the positions. If ballots are used. please make sure to sign your name on the ballot.

Previously reported – January 2019
Agenda Packet –
§30.26 AUDIT COMMITTEE OF THE BOC
APPOINTMENT, TERMS
The Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee shall be elected by the BOC at the first regular meeting in January. The Chairman of the Audit Committee shall make a recommendation to the Board of Commissioners on who shall serve as the Public Members. The Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee, an elected Commissioner, and each of the Public Members shall have a normal term of one year and shall serve at the pleasure of the BOC.

 Update –
The Board voted by ballot and selected the following four (4) people to be members of the Audit Committee. Mark Fleischhauer and Anthony Chavonne , current members of the Audit Committee, will be joined by the two new applicants Jeff Tansil and Jeannine Richman.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


5. Discussion and Possible Nomination of Member to Fill Alternate Member Vacancy on the Planning & Zoning Board – Town Clerk Finnell

Agenda Packet –
There is currently an alternate member vacancy on the Planning & Zoning Board. Tom Inzerillo and Stu Atwell  have expressed  interest  in  the  vacancy. Both are scheduled  to  be interviewed at  the special meeting.

The Board can vote by ballot or verbally to fill the position. If you vote by ballot, please make sure to sign your ballot.

Update –
The Board voted by ballot and selected Stu Atwell to fill the vacancy.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Volunteers needed
The Town is always looking for people to volunteer for their various boards and committees. If you are interested, submit a resume form to heather@hbtownhall.com.


6. Discussion and Direction on the 2020 Draft of Suggested Rules of Procedure for the Town of Holden Beach Board of Commissioners – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

 Agenda Packet –
Way too large a document (@20 pages) and too many changes to include here

Previously reported – December 2019
Agenda Packet –
The Board of Commissioners is required to adopt Rules of Procedure per the Town’s Code of Ordinances, Section 30.19.

I have included the version currently being used. Another version. the Suggested Rules of Procedure for a City Council, by the School of Government has also been used in the past. A copy of this version is also included in your packets. If the Board chooses to adopt either version for the upcoming term, the entire rules can be adopted, or amendments may be made. I suggest the Board review the materials and adopt rules at the January meeting.

The Board is required to adopt some version of Rules of Procedure each year. Heather has given them two (2) options or they can create their own new version. Pat has volunteered to review current version and make recommendations of any necessary changes. This will be on the agenda again next month so that they can adopt rules as required.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Update –
Decided to put off discussion until the February meeting giving the Board additional time to review all the changes.

No decision was made – No action taken


7. Discussion and Possible Action on Directive for the Town of Holden Beach Board of Commissioners’ Requests to Advisory Boards or Committees – Commissioner Kwiatkowski
a.
Resolution 20-01, Resolution of the Town of Holden Beach, North Carolina Concerning the Process and Format for Board of Commissioners’ Requests for Recommendations from Advisory Boards/Committees and the Recommendations Received

Agenda Packet –
Directive for Town of Holden Beach (THB) Board of Commissioner Requests for Opinion / Recommendation to Advisory Boards or Committees
The Board of Commissioners (BOC) is responsible for policy making as well as decisions on administrative matters (School of Government publication “County and Municipal Government in North Carolina”, Chapter 3, County and City Governing Boards). The BOC performs its duties when convened in legal meetings, addressing items contained in the meeting agenda. There are occasions when the BOC may determine that a recommendation or opinion from a THB Advisory Board or Committee on an item related to the Town’s current operations or future development would assist the BOC in making the best possible decision for the Town. When seeking Advisory Board (AB) or Committee (AC) recommendation, the following steps shall be followed:

. 1) The directive for a recommendation/opinion from a specific Board or Committee shall be made by vote at a Board of Commissioners regular meeting;

. 2) Specific charge questions for the opinion will be finalized and agreed by vote at a Board of Commissioners meeting;

. 3) A proposed deadline for receiving the recommendation will be included in the directive.

For recommendations having potential implications on Town finance, Town capital projects, Town contracts or Town departmental processes, the AB/AC shall provide its recommendation in a report to the BOC, such report to contain:

      1. The original BOC directive and charge;
      2. The AB/AC recommendation;
      3. The AB/AC vote tally;
      4. A synopsis of the discussions leading to the recommendation of the AB/AC, said synopsis to be discussed and approved at an Advisory Board/Committee public meeting;
      5. Copies of presentations or written positions given by staff or external experts during the evaluation process;
      6. References to supporting documents or publications used in the decision­ making process;
      7. Copies of minutes of public meetings at which the directive for recommendation was discussed.
    1. In order to normalize the process and improve the quality of public records of recommendations, a form entitled “Town of Holden Beach Advisory Board/Committee Recommendation” will be used. A format is provided below.

This directive document and/or form may be amended at any regular meeting or at any properly called special meeting for which amendment of the rules is one of the meeting’s stated purposes. Any amendment to these rules must be consistent with the town charter, any relevant statutes, and generally accepted principles of parliamentary procedure. To be adopted, a motion to amend these rules must be approved by a majority of the board’s members, excluding vacant seats and counting the mayor only if the mayor may vote on all questions.

RESOLUTION 20-01
RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH,NORTH CAROLINA CONCERNING THE PROCESS AND FORMAT FOR BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS’ REQUESTS FOR RECOMMENDATIONS FROM ADVISORY BOARDS/COMMITTEES AND THE RECOMMENDATIONS RECEIVED

THE LET IT BE KNOWN THAT:

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach, NC is a small barrier island community with a full-time resident population of less than one thousand people;

WHEREAS, many important tasks and functions critical to the continued successful operation of the Town’s business are performed by Town volunteers appointed by the Board of Commissioners to various Advisory Boards and Committees, whose organization and powers and duties are specified by ordinance and/or resolution;

WHEREAS, the Board of Commissioners (BOC) is responsible for policy making as well as decisions on administrative matters, the BOC performing its duties when convened in legal meetings, addressing items contained in the meeting agenda;

WHEREAS, there are occasions when the BOC may determine that a recommendation from a THB Advisory Board or Committee on a specific agenda item related to the Town’s current operations or future development would assist the BOC in making the best possible decision for the Town; and

WHEREAS, in the interest of efficiency and clarity, the Board of Commissioners desires to normalize the process and improve the quality of public records of BOC requests and AB/AC recommendations.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach that from the date of approval of this resolution, the BOC shall, when seeking Advisory Board or Committee recommendation, follow the steps outlined in document “Directive  for Town of Holden Beach (THB) Board of  Commissioners’ Requests for Recommendation  to Advisory Boards  or Committees”, following the format defined in form Town of Holden  Beach Board  Advisory  Board/Committee Recommendation.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED by the Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach that from the date of approval of this resolution, Advisory Boards or Committees shall, when making their recommendations to the BOC, also  follow the steps outlined in document “Directive  for Town of Holden  Beach (THB) Board  of Commissioners’ Requests  for  Recommendation  to  Advisory  Boards  or Committees”, following the format defined in form Town  of  Holden  Beach Board Advisory Board/Committee Recommendation.


Previously reported – November 2019

Town of Holden Beach Board Advisory Board/Committee

Recommendation


From the BOC to the Board / Committee

Date of BOC Meeting When Directive was Made:
Agenda Item #:
Directive to:(specify AB/AC)
Issue and Action Requested:
Background and Potential Implications:
Charge Questions:
Proposed Deadline:


To the BOC from the Board / Committee

AB/AC Recommendation:


Completed by Town clerk after BOC takes action

Date of BOC Meeting When Decision was Made
BOC Decision:
BOC Vote Tally:

ATTACHMENTS:


Pat explained that this was simply a proposal. She said that it was being put out there for review and feedback. To codify this directive, it will be issued as an administrative document adopted by resolution, not an ordinance.

No decision was made – No action taken

Previously reported – December 2019
Agenda Packet –
Noted comments from Commissioners at the November meeting: the directive should be adopted by resolution, the work opinion should be eliminated, and since there may be infrequent occasions where a request comes out of a special meeting, the statement should be altered to read “The directive for a recommendation from a specific Board or Committee will preferably be made by a vote at a BOC regular meeting.”.

Pat explained that this was just a second reading of her proposal and it was being put out there for review and feedback. They have not received any feedback yet. Next month it will be issued as an administrative document adopted by resolution, not an ordinance.

No decision was made – No action taken

Update –
This was the third time that this was on the agenda. It was put out there for review and feedback, but they did not receive any feedback. The Board is ready and willing to give this procedure a try.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


8. Discussion and Possible Action on a More Formal Procedure for the Board of Commissioners’ Requests for Actions to the Town Manager or Town Attorney – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Agenda Packet –
Town of Holden Beach Board of Commissioners’ Directives for Town Manager / Attorney Action
BOC Meetings often result in directives for Town Manager or Town Attorney action. When the full ask is not clearly expressed by the Board, the result is confusion and time loss by Staff as they try to get clarity from meeting tapes or follow-up discussion with Commissioners. At times, a month can be lost if clarification requires the full BOC be involved.

A written form for BOC requests made to the Town Manager or Town Attorney that result from discussion and agreement at BOC Meetings will reduce the level of uncertainty of the directive given that sometimes results, particularly after a lengthy debate.

In order to normalize the process and improve the quality of public records of such directives, a form entitled ‘Town of Holden Beach Board of Commissioners’ Directives for Town Manager/Attorney Action” will be used. If an agenda item owner anticipates a BOC decision could lead to a work request (e.g., ordinance or policy change, plan of action presentation, request for an outside study, etc.), the agenda item owner should submit a form for the meeting packet with items 1, 3 and 6 already completed; if necessary, item 6 can be amended by the agenda item owner following discussion. Items 4, 5 and 8 must be clearly defined and agreed by the SOC before the vote, these items to be entered into the final form by the town clerk. Items 2 and 7 can be completed by the town clerk following the motion and vote. The form will become part of the meeting minutes as an official public record.

The format is provided below.

This directive document and/or form may be amended at any regular meeting or at any properly called special meeting for which amendment of the rules is one of the meeting’s stated purposes. Any amendment to these rules must be consistent with the town charter, any relevant statutes, and generally accepted principles of parliamentary procedure. To be adopted, a motion to amend these rules must be approved by a majority of the board’s members, excluding vacant seats and counting the mayor only if the mayor may vote on all questions.

Previously reported – November 2019
Agenda Packet –
BOC Meetings often result in requests for Town Manager or Attorney action. There are times when the full ask is not clearly expressed by the Board, leading to confusion and time loss by Staff as they try to get clarity from meeting tapes or follow-up discussion with Commissioners.

A written form for BOC requests made to the Town Manager or Town Attorney that result from discussion and agreement at BOC Meetings could reduce the level of uncertainty that sometimes results, particularly after a lengthy debate.

Below is a draft of what a form might look like.

Town of Holden Beach Board of Commissioner Requests for
Town
Manager / Attorney action

    1. Date of BOC Meeting
    2. Agenda Item #
    3. Issue:
    4. Request to:
    5. Motion:
    6. Action Requested:
    7. Vote Tally:
    8. Proposed Deadline:

If an agenda item owner anticipates a BOC decision could lead to a work request (e.g., ordinance  or policy change, plan of action presentation, request for an outside study, etc.), the agenda item owner would submit a form for the meeting packet with items 1 and 3 already completed and possibly  a proposal for what they think the action could be and who the request will be made to (to be finalized after discussion and vote);Items 2, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 can be completed by the town clerk or BOC executive  secretary following discussion and vote. The form would become part of the meeting minutes.


Pat explained again that this was simply a proposal. She said that it was being put out there for review and feedback. The gist of her position is for them to clarify: What exactly are we asking for? The action is to develop a specific ask so it can be properly actioned

No decision was made – No action taken

Previously reported – December 2019
Pat explained that this was just a second reading of her proposal and it was being put out there for review and feedback. They have not received any feedback yet. Next month it will be issued as an administrative document adopted by resolution, not an ordinance.

No decision was made – No action taken

Update –
This was the third time that this was on the agenda too. They chose to adopt this formal procedure when they make a specific request for activity.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


9. Discussion and Possible Action on Ordinance for Maximum House Size Construction – Attorney Carpenter

Agenda Packet –
Attached is a presentation provided by Inspections Director Evans at a previous meeting. Based on the presentation,  the  Board directed  him  to  prepare  an  ordinance  around  his  description  for house  size limitation and provide it to the attorney before it is presented to the Board for review. The item is on the agenda for the attorney to issue comments and guidance to the Board

Previously reported – December 2018
Agenda Packet –
I would like to have the Planning and Zoning Board revisit the issue, by investigating and reporting to the Board of Commissioners on the feasibility and applicability of the measures proposed by Dare County, as follows:

    1. At last week’s Duck Town Council meeting, members considered a recommendation by the Duck Planning Board to regulate occupancy by establishing town standards for the capacity of septic systems based on lot sizes.
    2. They also scheduled for 5 a public hearing on a draft ordinance that would set a tiered approach to regulating house size based on lot size.

Dare Towns Look to Manage ‘Mega-Houses’
As Dare County municipalities try to address concerns about the proliferation of “mega-houses” and their impact on the character and environment of beach communities, the town councils in both Southern Shores and Duck met last week to explore new approaches to the issue.
Read more » click here

Update –
Planning & Inspections Director Evans poured some cold water on the discussion, by reminding them that you cannot legally regulate the number of bedrooms. That said, they would like to investigate if it is feasible to obtain the same outcome but approach it from a different way.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Previously reported – June 2019
Agenda Packet –
The Planning Board has approved a proposed ordinance change for consideration by the Board of Commissioners. As you are aware, Commissioners have voiced some concerns over possible future and present issues related to homes that are so large that they pose an impact to the quality environment that the Holden Beach wishes to portray.

This ordinance has been vetted by the planning Department and is similar to other beach town regulation pertaining to the same issues.

Proposed Zoning Ordinances Changes

      • Maximum House Size of 6,000 square feet
      • Progressive Setbacks
      • Protection of Storm Water Discharge through Reduction
      • Traffic Reduction
      • Reduced Parking Density
      • Reduction of Trash refuse
      • Improve Quality of Life
      • Increase Lot Open Space
      • Decrease Potential Secondary Storm Debris

 Clear, concise, easily understood presentation by Timbo. This has been a major issue for years. He said that he attempted to be fair and equitable for everyone. Well thought out, benchmarked other beach town regulations and the Planning Board has already signed off on the proposal. Proposal would not be changing the dynamics of what has been done before; but homes will fit better on the lots now. Next step is for staff to put this into an Ordinance format.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Previously reported – October 2019
Agenda Packet –
Attached is the proposed ordinance for maximum house size construction that Inspections Director Evans sent to Attorney Fox for review per the Board’s direction. Attorney Fox suggested that the new attorney selected by the Board have the opportunity to review it before action is taken. If the Board agrees a motion to send it to the new attorney should be made.

§157.060 RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT (R-1).
.   (D) Dimensional requirements R-1.

.     (1) Lot area. Minimum required:
.        (a) For a one-family dwelling,5,000 square feet.
.        (b) For a two-family dwelling, 7,500 square feet.
.    (2) Lot width. Minimum required: 50 feet.
.    (3) Front Yard Setbacks per structure size:
.         <4000 Square Feet Minimum Required: 25 Feet
.         4000 < 5000 Square Feet Minimum Required: 30 Feet
.         5000 > 6000 Square Feet Minimum Required: 35 Feet
.    (4) Side Yard Setbacks per Structure Size:
.         4000 Square Feet Minimum Required: 5 feet
.         4000 < 5000 Square Feet Minimum Required: 7 Feet
.         5000 > 6000 Square Feet Minimum Required:10 Feet
.       (a) Open porches, decks, or overhangs shall not extend into minimum setbacks
. (5) Rear Yard Setbacks Per structure S1ze
.        <4000 Square Feet Minimum Required: 20 Feet
.        4000 < 5000 Square Feet Minimum Required: 25 Feet
.        5000 > 6000 Square Feet Minimum Required: 30 Feet
. (7) Lot coverage.
.    (a) Lot coverage of main structure shall not exceed 30% of the platted lot. If structure is 4000 square feet or greater then lot coverage cannot be greater than 25 percent. If structure coverage is 5000 square feet or greater lot coverage is limited to 20 percent.
. (12) Minimum floor area of building 750 square feet of heated space.
.       (a) Maximum Structure Size of any dwelling shall be 6000 Square Feet
. (13) Open uncovered stairs, not including any deck or landing at porch level, may project up to ten feet into the required front or rear yards of structures <4000 Square Feet, but not both.

New Town attorney will work on language that is both lawful and enforceable.
Consensus of the Board is to put item on the agenda at the November Regular Meeting

Update –
Item was removed from the agenda yet again


10. Discussion on Revising, Section 72.02 (K) Parking Regulated on Public Streets and Rights-of-Way – Commissioner Sullivan

Agenda Packet –
PARKING DISCUSSION
After due discussion and consideration, in April 2018 the Board of Commissioners voted to revise ordinance section 72.02 PARKING REGULATED ON PUBLIC STREETS AND RIGHTS OF WAY. The revised ordinance contains section(k) It shall be a violation of this chapter to leave standing any portion of a vehicle in a lawful parking area between the hours of 2:00am and 5:00am.

The stated purpose for the revision was a concern for the safety, privacy and property rights of the property owners of Holden Beach. Due to an increase in proactive enforcement measures of the Holden Beach Police Department related to parking in the right of way, the benefit of the revision has been questioned by some residents and visitors.

In an attempt to address the stated concerns and also protect the stated purposes of the revised ordinance, I suggest the following course of action:

    1. Suggest to rental agencies that the number of available legal spaces be included in all advertisements for rental This will give potential renters an opportunity to determine if a rental home has sufficient parking for their needs.
    2. Allow Holden Beach property owners, displaying a valid Holden Beach Vehicle Decal, to park in the right of way adjacent to their property as long as such parking is not otherwise prohibited, e. no parking on OBW or within 25 feet of an intersection. This limited exception, coupled with other ordinance provisions, should address the vast majority of complaints without expanding the potential for overcrowding and the conversion of smaller rental properties into “event” properties.

Previously reported – August 2018
Agenda Packet –
Town Ordinance 18-07- revise Section (K) or create a new section in the ordinance that clearly states the following recommended wording: Vehicles shall not be permitted to park in any beach access or any municipal designated parking areas, between the hours of 2:00am to 5:00am.

It is also recommended that signs be posted in the nine (9) municipal designated parking areas.

TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH / ORDINANCE 18-07
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE HOLDEN BEACH CODE OF ORDINANCES, CHAPTER 72: PARKING REGULATIONS (SECTION 72.03 PARKING REGULATED ON PUBLIC STREETS AND RIGHTS-OF-WAY)
(K) Additional violation. It shall be a violation of this chapter to leave standing any portion of a vehicle in a lawful parking area for a period exceeding 72 consecutive hours between the hours of 2:00a.m. and 5:00a.m.

Much ado about nothing. It was the Board’s intent to not permit parking between 2:00am and 5:00am only in the nine municipal designated parking areas. All of that verbiage was not included in the Ordinance they adopted. Apparently, Wally assured them that is not the case. He indicated that a revision of the Ordinance was not required. The police department will use their discretion and enforce only in municipal designated parking areas which was the Board’s intent.

No decision was made – No action taken

Previously reported – July 2019
Joe was concerned that tickets were being written for property owner vehicles parked in the right-of-way on their own property. They discussed what was the Board’s intent and what are the ramifications if they make any changes.

Once again, they decided that a revision of the Ordinance was not required. The Police Department will use their discretion and enforce only in municipal designated parking areas which was the Board’s original intent.

No decision was made – No action taken

Minutes – July 2019
DISCUSSION AND POSSIBLE ACTION TO REVISE CHAPTER 72: PARKING REGULATIONS, SECTION 72.02(K)
Commissioner Butler read the current verbiage concerning parking in Section 72.02(K). He believes the Board’s intent last August was to prohibit parking in the nine municipal areas between the hours of 2:00a.m.- 5:00a.m. Commissioner Sullivan said it is specifically how the Board wanted it. The Board had the discussion whether it would be better to prohibit the parking somewhere like under the bridge, but then that person would go park by someone’s home. He said the problem when the issue was raised was that people were complaining that people were parking overnight. After all of the discussions, the Board decided that the most effective way to accomplish the goal was to have a window when you couldn’t leave your car parked. Commissioner Butler stated we have people who need to park in the rights-of-way (ROW) between the hours of 2:00a.m.- 5:00a.m. Commissioner Sullivan said this is an example of what he was talking about; the Board talks about something, passes a rule and then after it is put in place, we feel like we need to revise it. He said if we are going to allow people to parking in the ROW, we might as well just rescind the whole ordinance. Commissioner Butler said he is not in favor of that. Commissioner Sullivan said the police will not know if a car belongs to the person at a house. He asked what the Board would be accomplishing. He suggested if the Board is going to make a change, they should give more thought and decide what the ramifications of the change would be. The guy that would park under the bridge will now park in front of somebody’s house and fisherman can’t park at all. Commissioner Butler said the municipal parking areas are identified with signs that say the prohibited hours. He explained we are a family beach and want to retain that title.

Planning Director Evans clarified there is a distinction between the ROW and municipal areas. Any homeowner can stop people from parking in the ROW by putting up the legalized barriers. Commissioner Sullivan said if someone is renting a home, they won’t put up a fence because people may need to park there. It would take the problem from someone staying under the bridge and possibly move it to someone’s house. Commissioner Butler said he is glad the Board is discussing this. He had an officer bring it to his attention that it was hard to control this. Commissioner Freer stated he would leave it as it is, and it is at the discretion of the Police Department to enforce it. Commissioners Sullivan and Butler agreed.

Mayor Holden stated he bet the others aren’t getting the complaints he is getting. He provided information regarding a complaint concerning someone’s grandson who received a $75 ticket because there wasn’t anywhere to park during the night and there wasnt enough parking at the family house. The man has owned property for approximately 40 years. A friend of his looked for no parking signs and they couldn’t find any signs. Mayor Holden said this it isn’t working, and he will start sharing the complaints he receives. He asked how people are supposed to know there is no parking. He said people ask where they are supposed to park, there is nowhere to legally park. The citizen from the complaint he described said if all of the public parking is shut down and the streets are shut down, he would need to take his grandson to Walmart or somewhere to leave his car overnight.

Previously reported – August 2019
Apparently at the discretion of the Police Department meant something different to the Board and to the Police Department. The Police Department chose to enforce the ordinance and wrote twenty-three (23) tickets for vehicles parked in the right-of-way. Needless to say, Commissioner Butler was not happy with the situation. After another round of robust discussion, it was still unclear as how they planned to amend the Ordinance. They were all in agreement that it shall be a violation to leave any vehicle that is parked between the hours of 2:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m. in the nine (9) municipal public parking areas. What was not so clear, was parking in the right-of-way.

They were unable to amend ordinance because it was not on the original agenda. They asked the Police Chief to use his discretion and just focus on municipal public parking areas until they can amend ordinance at the next regular meeting.

Frankly we are making this way too complicated. On street parking should be allowed all the time. If an owner wants to restrict parking, they can use a post and rope fence. If someone parks between 2:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m. and is carrying on, then just call the Police the same way you would any other time of the day.

Previously reported – September 2019
The proposal allows owners to park four (4) additional vehicles in the right-of way on their property. The storm vehicle decals issued to each property owner is what will be used for identification. The Board asked the Town attorney to prepare a revised Ordinance.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


This is a solution in search of a problem!


Previously reported – October 2019
§72.02 PARKING REGULATED ON PUBLIC STREETS AND RIGHTS-OF-WAY. (K) Additional violation. It shall be a violation of this chapter to leave standing any portion of a vehicle in a lawful parking area between the hours of 2:00 a.m. and 5:00 a.m.

Agenda Packet –
PARKING DISCUSSION
After due discussion and consideration, in April 2018 the Board of Commissioners voted to revise ordinance section 72.02 PARKING REGULATED ON PUBLIC STREETS AND RIGHTS OF WAY. The revised ordinance contains section(k) It shall be a violation of this chapter to leave standing any portion of a vehicle in a lawful parking area between the hours of 2:00am and 5:00am.

The stated purpose for the revision was a concern for the safety, privacy and property rights of the property owners of Holden Beach. Due to an increase in proactive enforcement measures of the Holden Beach Police Department related to parking in the right of way, the benefit of the revision has been questioned by some residents and visitors.

In an attempt to address the stated concerns and also protect the stated purposes of the revised ordinance, I suggest the following course of action:

1. Suggest to rental agencies that the number of available legal spaces be included in all advertisements for rental properties. This will give potential renters an opportunity to determine if a rental home has sufficient parking for their needs.

2. Allow Holden Beach property owners, displaying a valid Holden Beach Vehicle Decal, to park in the right of way adjacent to their property as long as such parking is not otherwise prohibited, i.e. no parking on OBW or within 25 feet of an intersection. This limited exception, coupled with other ordinance provisions, should address the vast majority of complaints without expanding the potential for overcrowding and the conversion of smaller rental properties into “event” properties.

New Town attorney will work on language that is both lawful and enforceable.
Consensus of the Board is to put item on the agenda at the November Regular Meeting.

Update –
Item was removed from the agenda yet again


11. Discussion of Opposition to the Proposed Inlet Hazard Area Plan

Handout –
Proposed Motion – The BOC’s for THB authorize the Town Manager and town employees to take all actions they deem necessary to prepare a response in opposition to the proposed Inlet Hazard Area plan, by the conclusion of the Public Comment Period, currently January 31, 2020, and that are permitted by NC law without further BOC’s approval.

Update –
Item was added to the agenda

Mike said this was added so people could speak at the beginning of the meeting. This was somewhat of a dubious plan since you are required to signup before the meeting if you want to speak during the early Public Comments session. The motion allows the town staff to continue what they have been doing without needing the Board’s approval each time. David spoke and said that they have voiced their concerns over a long period of time, going all the way back to 2010. Staff has attended meetings religiously and have addressed the powers that be several times already. THB workshop was well attended, and all the Commissioners were there. Currently we are working with Applied Technology and Management (ATM)  to crystalize our position against the proposed plan. In addition, the Brunswick County Manager has agreed to write a letter in opposition of the plan too.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


.
Breaking News
Public Comment period on the proposed rulemaking to update IHA has been extended to March 2nd
.


Previously reported – November 2018
Commissioner Butler made a motion to add Public Comments at BOC’s Special Meetings as an agenda item

Mayor Pro Tem Mike Sullivan and Commissioner Patricia Kwiatkowski both objected. Although both are in favor of making the change, they oppose the way it was introduced.
They have been consistent in their position as follows:

      • Process needs to be followed
      • Items need to be submitted prior to the meeting
      • Material should be provided prior to meeting so they can review and understand it
      • Information should be included in Agenda Packet
      • The public should also see material prior to meeting

This is not the first time Mike has added an agenda item despite his stated position about not doing so. Ironic, isn’t it? I agree that this item should have been added to the agenda, understand that time is of the essence. Generally speaking, I’m opposed to adding agenda items in the eleventh hour, but common sense must prevail, and this is one of those times.


12. Discussion Pertaining to the Speed Limit on Ocean Boulevard – Commissioner Sullivan

Agenda Packet –
Holden Beach Code of Ordinances / SCHEDULE I. SPEED LIMITS.

(A)       The streets or parts of streets described in this traffic schedule shall have the speed limits designated in the following table.

(B)      In accordance with division (A) of this traffic schedule, the following speed limits shall be established for the following streets or parts of streets:

Name of StreetSpeed Limit (mph)Seasonal

Limitations

S.R. 1116 (Ocean Boulevard, East and West), from its western terminus to its eastern terminus35April 1 – September 30 (inclusive)
S.R. 1116 from a point 1.76 miles west of NC 130 (Greensboro Street) to a point 5.01 miles west of NC 130 (west end of road).45October 1 – March 31 (inclusive each year)
Delanne Street15
Dunescape Drive15
Serenity Lane15
Windswept Way15
All other streets25
And all other streets within the Holden

Beach West Subdivision

25No seasonal limitations

Update –
Proposal is to reduce speed limit on OBW to 35 miles per hour year-round

Police Chief Dixon had four (4) talking points

    1. Accident death rate goes from 45% to 85% when speed is increased by 10mph
    2. Stopping distance increases by 79 feet when speed is increased by 10mph
    3. Time difference from general store to west end gate is just over 1 minute with change
    4. Lower speed limit allows golf carts and installation of crosswalks

Timbo said that the town currently has identified four (4) authorized areas that meet the established criteria for crosswalks if we maintain the lower speed limit year-round. Jeremy was a little sheepish when asked if we had any issues with the higher speed limit because the answer was, we have not. That said, the four talking points are fairly persuasive. It was just  the first round of discussion and the Board agreed they need to get more community input. Interestingly the HBPOA 2019 survey question on this had a very strong response of almost 80% for keeping the 45mph speed limit in the off season.

No decision was made – No action taken


13. Discussion and Possible Action on Classification and Pay Study and the Updated Personnel Policy Created by the Management & Personnel Services Group – Commissioner Kwiatkowski
a. Class Specifications
b.
Pay Plan
c.
Implementation of Option I
d.
Ordinance 20-02, An Ordinance Amending Ordinance 19-10, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance for Fiscal Year 2019 – 2020 (Amendment No. 8)
e.
Personnel Policy

Agenda Packet –
The attached Budget Amendment  is necessary to implement the Classification and Pay Plan per BOC direction. It has been developed in accordance with BOC direction for implementing Option 1 previously briefed to the BOC at the Special Meeting of September 17,2019. The budget amendment  totals $51k and provides implementation funding for the new pay plan to be effective for the second half of the 2019/2020 fiscal year.

Previously reported – February 2019
Commissioner Freer asked that the Town initiate a request for proposal (RFP) to do the following:

    1. Establish set job descriptions for each position, and a compensation pay range
    2. Conduct a total compensation study

Previously reported – April 2019
Town Manager Hewett said that they had already engaged the MAPS Group. The process has been started but he anticipated that it would take the better part of three to four months before they had the completed report.

The Management and Personnel Services Group – MAPS – is a team of consultants specializing in human resource management and development.
For more information » click here

Previously reported – June 2019
Evaluation of compensation package and job descriptions should be completed shortly. After Town Manager reviews report it will be presented to the BOC’s.

Previously reported – July 2019
MAPS including end of fiscal year salary rate changes is still working on the study
David should be able to present to the Board in August

Previously reported – August 2019
Agenda Packet –
The Maps Group has completed their research for the Classification and Pay Study and would like to schedule a meeting to review their findings with the Board. Becky Veazey from the MAPS Group, has provided their availability for the last week in August and for the first couple of weeks in September. Please provide Town Clerk Finnell with your schedules so we can coordinate a time to hold a special meeting. Ms. Veazey anticipates the information will take approximately one hour to present to the Board.

Heather handled; they simply need to coordinate their schedules to set meeting date.

Previously reported – September 2019
The study updates the classification and pay plan for THB as well as making recommendations concerning personnel policies and fringe benefits. Recommendations are being made for salary schedule, position classification plan, and costs for implementing the salary plan. Salary data determined by prevailing rate in geographic area as well as with employers who directly compete for the same pool of workers with those job skills. The salaries represent the local market which provides a reflection of the actual cost of living in the geographic area. Implementation strategy offered three options; the recommended option had an additional annual price tag of $80,327 in just salary cost. An additional cost of roughly 20% for benefits brings the total cost to implement at almost $100,000 annually. Interestingly, we offer significantly higher family health insurance coverage than the rest of the local market, yet we didn’t seem to get any credit for that in a total compensation package. Recommendations for THB are based on meeting the market, not leading the market. Takeaway was that we were in pretty good shape considering we hadn’t done a study in a very long time, but adjustments need to be made to stay competitive in the local market. Staying competitive in our total compensation package will allow us to recruit and retain employees. Presentation was a very pragmatic approach to the subject and clearly directs us on how to proceed.

Previously reported September 2019
The recommended option being considered had an additional annual price tag of $80,327 in just salary cost. An additional cost of roughly 20% for benefits brings the total cost to implement at almost $100,000 annually. The Board is considering adopting this option with the new personnel policy and classification and pay plan potentially beginning January 1, 2020. They have requested that the Town Manager look at how we would pay for it.

A decision was made – Approved (4-1)
Commissioner Freer voted against the motion

Previously reported – October 2019
Agenda Packet –
There are several items that need to be approved in order to implement the recommendations made by the MAPS Group. The Classification and Pay Plan and corresponding budget amendment (separate memo) need to be adopted. The Board should also vote to implement Option I. the implementation strategy approved at the September 17th meeting. effective January 1, 2020. The last item the Board needs to consider is approval of the updated Personnel Policy.

Suggested motions:

    • Approve the proposed Classification and Pay Study.
    • Approve Ordinance 19-15, An Ordinance Amending Ordinance 19-10. The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance for Fiscal Year 2019 – 2020 (Amendment No. 5) and implement Option I effective January 1, 2020.
    • Approve the proposed Personnel Policy.

Budget Amendment for Implementation of Classification and Pay Plan
The attached Budget Amendment is necessary to implement the Classification and Pay Plan per BOC direction. It has been developed in accordance with BOC direction for implementing Option 1 previously briefed to the BOC at the Special Meeting of September 17, 2019. The budget amendment totals $51k and provides implementation funding for the new pay plan to be effective for the second half of the 2019/2020 fiscal year.

Management and Personnel Services Group
For more information » click here
For more information » click here

Three of the Commissioners took a position that this should be addressed in the next budget cycle. They also stressed that we need to address all the components of the total compensation package not just implementing the pay plan.

A decision was made – Not Approved
Commissioners Fletcher, Freer, and Butler all voted against the motion

Update –
Pat briefly reviewed the timeline on this issue. She recommended changes to the submitted Personnel Policy which David agreed with and will incorporate them into the policy. Surprisingly, there was very little discussion regarding the pay plan with an annual increase in expenses in excess of $100,000.

Moved funds of $51,351

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

I am neither for nor against moving forward after due deliberation. Frankly, I’m more likely to be for than against. Really would have liked to see a workshop for the pay plan that considers the entire compensation package – salary, benefits, time off, and advancement opportunities. This also would have allowed them to include pay plan cost increases  to be incorporated into the next budget cycle.


14. Discussion and Possible Action on Poyner Spruill Contract – Assistant Town Manager Ferguson
a. Ordinance 20-03, An Ordinance Amending Ordinance 19-10, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance for Fiscal Year 2019 – 2020 (Amendment No. 9)

Agenda Packet –
The Town  retained  Poyner Spruill  LLP in conjunction  with the  Ferguson Group for  advocacy at  the federal level over the past year.   We received their contract for 2020 (attachment 1) and the monthly retainer will  increase by $750.00 per month.  The contract states the adjustment in fees more accurately reflects the amount of work involved in fulfilling the responsibilities required for the Commissions’ needs and priorities.  This change will require a budget amendment in the amount of $4500.00 (attachment 2) to meet the contract obligation for the remainder of this fiscal year.

Scope of Engagement. We have agreed to advise and assist you with governmental matters and legal issues that arise and the Client hereby engages Poyner Spruill LLP to perform the following services in accordance with the terms and conditions set forth in this Agreement: working with the Client to secure federal assistance and project management regarding:(1) federal issues related to any beach nourishment opportunities  at Holden  Beach, North  Carolina,  excluding  the Brunswick  County  Beaches  Corps  of Engineers 50-year Project and (2) federal issues related to Lockwood Folly Inlet maintenance along with beach nourishment efforts for placement of beach-quality sand on the east end of Holden Beach. The Client acknowledges and agrees that Poyner Spruill LLP does not have control over third party decision makers, and, that Poyner Spruill makes no representations, warranties, or guarantees that it can achieve  any particular results. Poyner Spruill LLP shall act in good faith with the necessary due diligence in connection with its performance of the services described herein. Two local meetings with the Council and two trips to Washington, D.C., per 12-month period, as well as a monthly status report, are included in the services to be provided. Our work for this engagement will be on the federal level. It is understood that The Ferguson Group will be assisting our firm on your behalf. As the need arises for specialized assistance, such as grant writing or for legislative monitoring/research, then fees and costs incurred for such services will be billed separately to the client.

Previously reported – October 2018
It has been the Mayor’s position that we need to hire a professional consulting firm because we need representation on multiple topics at the local, state and national levels of government. McIntyre did a brief recap of presentation that was made earlier in the day on what they can do for us. The consensus appeared to be that we need someone to speak on our behalf and they can make it happen.

Questions that remained to be answered are as follows:

    1. What are we going to get?
    2. How much will it cost?

Previously reported – November 2018
Ordinance 18-17, Approval is required in order to execute either of the proposals
Option 1 which reduces the level of proposed services (5) requires funding of $52,500
Option 2 the level of proposed services (10) requires funding of $66,500

For both options the amount to fund the retainer only provides funds through the end of the fiscal year.

Move funds of $66,500
From Revenue account #50.0399.0000 to Expense account#50.0710.0400

The Board in response to the presentation made by this firm requested them to bring back a proposal. Poyner Spruill submitted two proposals with a suite of services offered. Option 2 requires a retainer of $9,500 per month or a minimum of $114,000 annually. At this point we had what could be described as a spirited discussion.

Some of the major talking points were –

  • What are our priorities?
  • Have we utilized the other options available to us?
  • Should we talk to other providers and get competitive bids?
  • What are we comfortable spending?

In the end they asked the Town Manager to approach the firm and essentially ask them to redo their proposal. The BOC’s were able to agree to narrowing our priorities down to just two subject matters – Lockwood Folly Inlet and Beach Nourishment.

Request is to specifically ask them to clarify the scope of work, basic steps, deliverables, and the chances of success

Previously reported – December 2018
Agenda Packet –
Scope of Engagement
We have agreed to advise and assist you with governmental matters and legal issues that arise and the Client hereby engages Poyner Spruill LLP to perform the following services in accordance with the terms and conditions set forth in this Agreement: working with the Client to secure federal assistance and project management regarding: (1) federal issues related to beach nourishment at Holden Beach, North Carolina, and (2) federal issues related to Lockwood Folly Inlet maintenance.

Retainer
The retainer for our services will be $6,975.00 per month.

Holden Beach Renourishment Project, NC:
Background, Status and Proposed Scope of Work

Status
• Securing the funding to complete the General Reevaluation Report.
• Identifying an appropriate project plan.
• Obtaining sufficient borrow material available to construct and nourish the project for 50 years.
• Determining whether the amount of borrow material necessary to construct and nourish the project for 50 years can be obtained without significant environmental impacts.

Proposed Scope of Work
Step 1. Facilitate Discussions with the Corps of Engineers
Step 2. Develop a Detailed Strategy to Get the General Reevaluation Report Back on Track
Step 3. Initiate Implementation of the Strategy.
            (Steps 1-3 should be accomplished within the first six months of the contract.)
Step 4. Ensure that the Project is Properly Scoped
Step 5. Work to Ensure that the General Reevaluation Report is Completed in a Timely Manner.
Step 6.  Help Pursue a Construction New Start.

Poyner Proposal Options –
Option A –
The level of proposed services (10) requires funding of $9,500 per month or a minimum of $114,000 annually.
Option B –
The level of proposed services (5) requires funding of $7,500 per month or a minimum of $90,000 annually.
Option C –
The level of proposed services (2) requires funding of $6,975 per month or a minimum of $83,700 annually.

Update –
Once again, they asked the Town Manager to approach the firm and essentially ask them to redo their proposal. The BOC’s were able to agree to narrowing our priorities down to just one issue Beach Nourishment.

So, let me get this straight –
We go from ten (10) proposed services to just two (2) which is an 80% reduction
But the cost goes from $9,500 to $6,975 only a 27% reduction
But wait, it gets worse …
They reduce the service request to one issue without knowing what if any reduction in cost will be

Proposal / Ordinance 18-17
Approval is required in order to execute the proposal
Move funds of $41,850
From Revenue account #50.0399.0000 to Expense account#50.0710.0400

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


I’m confused… what just happened?


It’s not obvious to me, what exactly we are getting and how much it will cost us.

We just committed to hiring a prestigious law firm with little or no experience in beach nourishment issues.

Not to mention, we did not even bother to see what other firms can do and at what cost.

Do we know if this really is the best we can do?

Previously reported – January 2019
Agenda Packet –

Scope of Engagement
We have agreed to advise and assist you with governmental matters and legal issues that arise and the Client hereby engages Poyner Spruill to perform the following services in accordance with the terms and conditions set forth in this Agreement: working with the Client to secure federal assistance and project management regarding:(1) federal issues related to any beach nourishment opportunities at Holden Beach, North Carolina, excluding  the Brunswick  County Beaches  Corps of Engineers 50-year Project and (2) federal issues related to Lockwood  Folly Inlet maintenance along with beach nourishment efforts for placement of beach-quality sand on the east end of Holden Beach. The Client acknowledges and agrees that Poyner Spruill does not have control over third party decision makers, and, that Poyner Spruill makes no representations, warranties, or guarantees that it can achieve any particular results. Poyner Spruill shall act in good faith with the necessary due diligence in connection with its performance of the services described herein. Two local meetings with the Council and two trips to Washington, D.C, per 12-month period, as well as a monthly status report, are included in the services to be provided. Our work for this engagement will be on the federal level. It is understood that The Ferguson Group will be assisting our firm on your behalf. As the need arises for specialized assistance, such as grant writing or for legislative monitoring/research, then fees and costs incurred for such services will be billed separately to the client.

Retainer
The retainer for our services will be $6,975.00 per month.
Poyner Spruill agreement has been executed.
It is in place and becomes effective January 1st.

Update –
Christy briefly reviewed what they did for us so far. The discussion went along the lines that things don’t happen in one year that these things take time. So, the message here is for us all to be patient. Approval is necessary to execute contract for the remainder of the budget year.

Moved funds of $4,500
From Revenue account #50.0399.0000 to Expense account#50.0710.0400

A decision was made – Approved unanimously



The retainer for their services will be $7,725 per month or a minimum of $92,700 annually a 10.7% increase.
Retainer is the minimum it will cost us. Ferguson Group services are billed separately. Additionally, we are billed monthly for all kinds of additional charges.
 

Poyner Spruill promoted their working on Disaster Relief Act 2019 (Law 116-20)

THB was not selected for either a study or construction in the Long-Term Disaster Recovery Investment Plan

For more study information » click here
For more construction information » click here


15. Year-to-Date Financial Report – Commissioner Tyner

Agenda Packet – background information not provided

Woody discussed this with David, and they have agreed that the Town Manager would on a quarterly basis give the Board a summarized view of the budget. Brilliant!  Just so you know, that’s what we used to do.  The quarterly budget report presented a snapshot of where we stood at the end of each quarter.  David gave a simple explanation of each fund balance, comparing the budget numbers to the actual numbers. The numbers were presented in context, since we have huge seasonal fluctuations in both income and expenses.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


16. Discussion and Possible Action on Setting Board Objectives for the 2020 Calendar Year – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Agenda Packet –
The process followed for 2019, where BOC members and town staff used sticky notes to put up proposed objectives by agreed categories, can be used for 2020 if all are in agreement.  It takes 2 sessions to accomplish defining and scoring the objectives, followed by agreeing which ones will be the SOC’s priorities for 2020 at a BOCM. One of the 2 sessions can be combined with one of the town’s early 2020/2021budget meetings. The BOC should set a special meeting date for early February to start the objectives setting process.

Previously reported – January 2018
Goals & Objectives
Town Manager sorted by organizational groupings as follows:

      1. General Management
      2. Beach Nourishment / Shoreline Protection / Navigation
      3. Beach / Inlet Funding
      4. Town Facilities / Recreational Items
      5. Staffing
      6. Parking
      7. Communications
      8. Solid Waste
      9. Sewer System

Previously reported – January 2019
There would be benefit from a Board of Commissioners and Town Manager meeting to set agreed major 2019 objectives before we begin the budget process. BOC’s objective setting workshop scheduled in January.

Objectives sorted into five (5) categories

      1. Policies, procedures, and resolutions
      2. Ordinance related
      3. Financial / Budget
      4. Long term plans
      5. Advocacy

Update –
Same procedure that they used last year.
They will attempt to create a coherent list of objectives for each category.
By consensus they agreed to schedule a Special meeting to start the budget process.


17. Discussion and Possible Action to Start the Process to Determine the Town’s Future Use of the Recently Acquired 796 Ocean Boulevard West Property – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Agenda Packet – background information not provided

Previously reported – September 2019
Ordinance 19-15, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#3)

    • Provide funds for purchase of property at 796 OBW – approved $349,000
    • A significant portion of the cost of acquiring this property is offset by us no longer needing to do additional acoustical engineering.

 Update –
We need to determine what we will do with the building. The first step is deciding how you want to use the property. Pat’s position is that we need to keep building because of noise abatement issues. Board wanted to hand this off  to the Parks & Recreation Committee for them to develop some potential uses. Town Manager basically said “No Can Do” as he reminded them that they just established protocols and that they need to submit a request per Resolution 20-01 passed tonight. Touché!

No decision was made – No action taken

Basically, we have two options:
1.
Convert the house into some undetermined community facility
2.
Sell and move the house off the property

Poor optics: Are we to understand that they didn’t have a plan when we purchased this property?   It was my understanding that the building was going to be removed creating more space between the sewer station and residential properties. Property is not zoned commercial so for starters getting it changed from a residential zone to a commercial zone will take both time and money. Besides that we would have a huge expense to convert the house into a public facility, in order to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act, we will have ongoing expenses for housekeeping, maintenance, utilities and  security issues. Let’s cut our losses and sell the house and have it moved off the property.


18. Town Manager’s Report

FEMA / Storm Events

Florence / Michael
FloMike hurricane project funds have been awarded
Florence – federal and state $15,861,220
Michael – federal and state $8,547,505
FloMike total Cat G beach nourishment funding is $24,408,725
Town staff is working daily through new digital FEMA Grants Portal
We are on our 6th Project Manager, which is like a new one every nine (9) weeks

Dorian
Federal declaration was made for Hurricane Dorian that includes coastal communities in Brunswick County. Town has estimated approximately $4.5mm for Cat G FEMA reimbursements. We spent $25,400 for surveying and engineering services to meet the Dorian depth of closure requirement. Based on recent analysis it is now estimated at approximately $12mm for Cat G FEMA reimbursements.  At the IBPB meeting this week, they said that the new estimate is now closer to $15mm for Cat G FEMA reimbursements. 

Beach Nourishment
The sand search continues.  The hydrography survey and vibracores have been completed. However, we were told that an archeological side beam scan is required, before we can submit for permit modification.  Offshore investigation is moving forward expecting that it will be completed soon.

Canal Dredging Project
Working group met recently, this is an ongoing project for the last twelve (12) years

Spoil Area
Dog park was utilized for canal dredging spoil site. We did some site ditching prior to Hurricane Dorian storm event to facilitate draining of the pond.

Intent is to reestablish pre-dredge capabilities which in order of priority are as follows:

      • Permitted primary disaster debris management area
      • Public Works lay down yard
      • Dog Park

Must maintain compliance with environmental permit and monitoring
Safety is the priority for this site, at present it is not ready for use

Dog Park
The dog park will remain closed for the foreseeable future. The Town needed to use the land at the dog park to place material from the canal dredging project as the dredge spoils area. It is unknown when it will be returned to a useable state as a dog park again. They are currently looking at other options for a dog park on the island. Meanwhile, David has asked the County to consider including a dog park in the 35-acre nature park being planned for on the mainland just across the ICW from us. The dredge spoils area has turned the dog park into a pond for the time being.

Four people spoke during the Public Comments session –
all in favor of creating a new Dog Park area

Bend Widener Navigation Maintenance Project
The LWF inlet crossing maintenance project is underway with dredging operations by Goodloe Marine. Shore pipe is in place on the beach with placement of beach compatible sand near Bendigo Street and will continue moving west. Expect operations to continue through early February.

Lockwood Folly Inlet maintenance project continues on Holden Beach
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is currently conducting the Lockwood Folly Inlet maintenance project, pumping sand from the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (ICW) crossing at Lockwood Folly Inlet onto the beaches of Holden Beach. They are currently working near Avenue A, pumping sand onto the beach, and will continue to work west toward Blockade Runner. It is important to obey safety protocols during the project, which includes staying clear of the work zone. Signs and orange fencing clearly mark the work zone area. Individuals entering these designated areas can slow progress. The project should conclude in the next 3 to 4 weeks. Your cooperation is appreciated in avoiding work zones during this time.
Beacon dated January 23

Christmas Trees Recycling Project
The Town of Holden Beach participated in a Christmas tree recycling project in an effort to build the dune system. The trees were donated by three Lowes stores (Conway, Shallotte and Southport) after the season. Many thanks to Lowes, the Boy Scouts (Troop 262), the Girl Scouts (Troop 1262) from Sharon Methodist Church. Coastal Transplants used the trees as dune builders at the east end beach strand.

Editor’s Note –
Mike Pearson a member of the Inlet Beach Protection Board (IBPB) should be commended for his efforts in making this happen. Mike  and the IBPB have been working on this over a year. It is on the IBPB Agenda Meeting agenda every month and they pushed for this project. They utilized studies that showed how the trees are more effective than sand fences in dune formation, and also contribute valuable organic matter as they breakdown which enhances vegetation growth and stability.  In addition, there is a significant cost savings to the Town. The trees were placed on the east end between 166 OBW and Jordan Blvd and also between 801-843 OBW.

BAW Paving
Brunswick Avenue West Paving work will be started after Easter and should be completed before Memorial Day. 

Previously reported – October 2018
Project is for Brunswick Avenue West only. You read that right, from Rothschild to High Point is all we are talking about. If you have ever driven down the street, you know that settlement has occurred, and the pavement is wavy making for a roller coaster type ride. The game plan is to utilize wedging for the low areas and then a layer of asphalt over the top of the entire road. Discussion was whether to go all in or do a test segment. The approach they agreed to is to do the worst areas only in the first year. Engineers Preliminary Construction Cost Estimate $255,194. In 2015 the Board implemented a tax increase of
$.010 that would generate approximately $115,000 annually for infrastructure, specifically street paving and maintenance. With no additional funds being allocated they could do a little less than half of the project in 2020.

Genset
Returned rental to vendor, no budget allocation for backup power generator
Right Angle working on proposal for a permanent solution

A generator set, also known as a genset, is the combination of an electrical generator and an engine mounted together to form a single piece of equipment that produces electrical power. … Generation sets are used in sites that are not connected to the power grid or to supply emergency power when the grid fails.

Previously reported – September 2019
Town Hall genset is history
Discussing options – repair cost / noise level / location are all issues being considered

Editor’s Note –
Why does the Town Hall need a genset?
Don’t we have a genset at the EOC?
Isn’t the EOC where they would be for long term outages like storm events?
These things are not cheap, and we rarely have power outages.

Public Beach Access / 289.5 OBW
Construction has been completed
CAMA grant funded; reimbursement has been applied for

Previously reported – February 2019
Governor Roy Cooper announced that Holden Beach was awarded a public access grant for $16,335 for the construction of a beach access walkway at 289.5 OBW 

Previously reported –December 2019
Public beach access walkway at 289.5 OBW is under construction

HB Chapel Repairs
Construction beginning in February lasting 6-8 weeks
The Chapel will need to use Town Hall facilities for some of their meetings
This is covered by a reciprocity agreement that we have in place with them

Run HB
Had approximately 1,050 people registered with 776 people that finished the races

Previously reported – December 2019
The sixth annual “Run Holden Beach” event is scheduled on Saturday, January 18th. Coastal Race Productions is planning a 1 mile “turtle trot”, 5K walk / run and a half marathon with all of these races starting and finishing under the bridge. This will all be followed by live music, games and an after party at the Holden Beach Pavilion.

Upcoming Town Sponsored Events
Town of Holden Beach officially established on February 14, 1969

Help us celebrate our 51st Anniversary!

You are invited to the Town’s Birthday Celebration on Friday, February 14th at noon. The event will include lunch and a ceremony to seal the time capsule. Please feel free to bring items to place into the capsule that capture life on Holden Beach today. The Town will provide the meal. Registration is required by Friday, February 7th at 5:00 p.m.
Call 910. 842.6488 to register


Receipt of Inlet and Beach Protection Board Report
Previously reported –
Ordinance 18-02 established the Inlet and Beach Protection Board
The Ordinance requires a written report from this Board

Agenda Packet –
December IBPB Meeting Update

The Inlet and Beach Protection Board (IBPB) met December 19 and the following issues and topics were discussed and addressed:

Status of the Beach and Inlets: Staff provided an overview of current and future projects, efforts  and conditions, and issues relative to the beach strand and inlets. A copy of the Assistant Town Manager’s Report to the IBPB is attached.

Other Updates: “Keep Off the Dunes” signs, which were approved in the adopted budget have arrived. It is hoped that the signs will discourage people from walking in the dunes. Additional mats have also arrived. The Town will again be collecting Christmas Trees from area vendors for placement along the dune line. The Boy Scouts will be helping.

Quarterly IBPB Newsletter: A draft of a Year-End IBPB Newsletter was reviewed and edited. It will be distributed via an emailed blast by the Town.

IBPB Meeting Schedule: The meeting schedule for the upcoming year was reviewed and approved.

Meeting Updates:

    • Brunswick County Shoreline Protection: The IBPB will be represented at the next scheduled meeting in January.
    • The next IBPB meeting will be January 23,2020.

Attachment (1): Assistant Town Manager’s Report to the IBPB, December 19, 2019

IBPB Notes

The following is the status of the inlet and beach projects:

  • Sand Search-data collection and analysis continues with ATM coordinating with subcontractors.They are looking for good weather. The magnetometer and side-scan/multi-beam efforts  will be separate due to differing requirements and transect spacing for the 500-meter hardbottom buffer.
  • Inlet Crossing/Bend Widener Project- We met with the agencies and dredge company last week.Pipe was put on the beach through the end of last week. Pumping began late Monday, December 16’h and will go through early January. They anticipate  pumping approximately 7000 cy per day with a total of a little over 200,000 cy expected from the project. This dredge is new to Goodloe Marine, as they only had it four to five months.  Production volumes may be different than expected.  They are expecting nighttime operations.
  • UNCW is planning a site visit to start collecting data. We provided a shapefile with survey lines per their request and honored a request for a gator for use while they are here for this initial trip.
  • Florence/Michael Projects- We received an award announcement for Michael in the amount of$8 million plus. We received an award announcement from Florence in the amount of $15 million plus.  We still have to receive and sign approved PWs.
  • For Dorian, the extra surveys should be complete by the end of this week and Fran will begin his analysis for an updated memo to FEMA. He expects to get that to FEMA by mid-January. We are continuing to upload data in the grants portal.
  • We are still waiting to hear about the project study selection for the 5O-year project.
  • Fran is coordinating with DCM and the Corps for permit extensions on the SDI-5 permit.

Beach & Inlet Newsletter
As 2019 comes to an end we would like to take an opportunity to update you on beach and inlet news and the status of projects.

PLANS AND REPORTS

  • An update was provided to our Oceanfront and Inlets Management Plan this year. The plan can be found at http://hbtownhall.com/files/132944795.pdf and provides a roadmap for future projects and maintenance. It will be updated annually to reflect ever-changing needs and priorities.
  • The Annual Beach Monitoring report can be found at http://hbtownhall.com/files/133141489.pdf. It is an annual report of changes to the beach as compared to the previous year and provides detailed survey maps.

 PROJECTS

Inlet Dredging
a) The Lockwood Folly (LWF) outer bar was dredged by the Merritt (side caster) for navigation purposes this fall. The cost to the Town was $37,476.00.

b) The Corps is dredging the LWF bend widener and AIWW Inlet Crossing with beneficial placement of sand on the east end in December. The cost to the Town was approximately $388,000.

Beach Renourishment
a) Florence/Michael Hurricane Renourishment Project- We received an award announcement for Michael in the amount of $8,547,506. We also received an award announcement for Florence in the amount of $15,861,220. We are in the planning and permitting stage now. Part of this process includes a sand search to identify a suitable sand source. ATM is currently working to update the permit and conduct the sand search.

OTHER NEWS
Members of the Inlet and Beach Protection Board attended the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association Conference, the NC Beach, Inlet, and Waterway Association Meeting, the Quarterly Long-term MOA Stakeholders Meeting and the Brunswick Shoreline Protection Meeting. This year’s operating budget included signs for the dunes and replacement beach mats. There were also funds provided for a collaboration with UNCW to map dune vegetation and inlet changes.

The Inlet and Beach Protection Board meets the 4th Thursday of the month at 10:00 a.m. For additional information on any of the above items, please contact Town Manager David Hewett at (910) 842-6488.


 General Comments –

Mayor Holden – was not in attendance

There were thirty (30) members of the community in attendance
    • Average attendance at meetings for 2019 was twenty-four (24)

The BOC’s Regular Meeting is scheduled on the second Tuesday of the month, February 11th

It was The Patty Show, and I mean it in the nicest way possible. She was on point, did the work, appears to be the only one doing the heavy lifting, delivered the goods, and finally managed to get a number of agenda items over the finish line. Feel that several agenda items could and should have been handled in separate workshops. The Board breezed through agenda items , with little or no discussion most of the night. Pretty disappointed that they voted in lock step and the optics were like it was just a rubber stamp formality. In June the recommended actions necessary for implementation of a revenue neutral tax rate included some expense reductions that were questioned by the Board. We had an attempt at some lastminute horse trading over some of the expense reductions but in the end, it was left to the Town Manager to make any necessary adjustments. Fast forward and six months later we just added some significant expenses to the Town’s budget. At that time, they made a big deal about how lean the budget is, yet there are three (3) budget amendments significantly  increasing expenses at this meeting alone. The pay increase approved tonight was over $100,000 by itself.  Keep in mind that each expense of approximately $134,000 annually would require a tax increase of $.010. If the budget was as lean as advertised then one has to ask: How is it possible to cover these expenses? Either the Town is really playing some sort of shell game with the numbers or we can expect a tax increase in the near future.


News & Views reports what’s happening on Holden Beach and in the surrounding area with items of interest.

Post contains the following:
.      1)
Calendar of Events
.      2)
Reminders
.      3)
Upon Further Review
.      4)
Corrections & Amplifications
.      5)
Odds and Ends
.      6)
This and That
.      7)
Factoid That May Interest Only Me
.      8)
Things I Think I Think
.       
a) Restaurant Review
.       
b) Book Review


Loose Ends –

      • Development Fees                                                              June 2018
      • Waste Ordinance Enforcement Policy                           January 2019
      • Fee Based Rollout of Containers                                     January 2019
      • Commercial District                                                          February 2019
      • Land Use Plan                                                                    October 2019
      • Parking                                                                               October 2019
      • Mega-Houses                                                                     October 2019
      • Audit Remedial Policies & Procedures                          November 2019 

Board of Commissioners’ – Scorecard

NYC Mayor Koch used to ask – How am I doing?

Imagine if the BOC’s asked you – How’d they do?

 The goal of government is to make citizens better off.


Action Taken – 2019

January

Ordinance 19-01, Chapter 151: Building and Housing Regulations
.  a)
Remove Sections in §151
.    •
Removal of impact fees verbiage / session law 2018-34
Adoption Resolution 19-01, Condemnation action to acquire perpetual easements

February
Adoption Resolution 19-02, Advertisement by electronic means for formal bidding
Adoption Resolution 19-03, Designation of Applicant’s Agent
Ordinance 19-02, Chapter 50: Solid Waste
.    •
No Action Taken

March
Ordinance 19-03,
Chapter 50: Solid Waste
Ordinance 19-04, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#5)
.    •
Provide funds to find a new sand source for beach nourishment – approved $170,000 Ordinance 19-05, Chapter 157: Zoning Code
.    •
No Action Taken

April
Ordinance 19-06, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#6)
.    • FEMA Florence reimbursement check, appropriation of the funds – $96,562.57
Ordinance 19-07, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#7)
   • Development of a cost justified water and wastewater system Development Fees Report – approved $10,000

May
Ordinance 19-08, Adopting a Supplement to the Code of Ordinances
.    •
Codifies the ordinances the Board approved since the last supplement

June     
Ordinance 19-09, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#8)
   •
Provide funds for LWF inlet dredging – approved $388,295
Ordinance 19-10, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance / Budget Ordinance
   • Approved the town’s $17.3 million-dollar Budget Ordinance
Approval of Contract for Sewer System Engineering Services
   • Structural and Mechanical Modifications to Vacuum Sewer Pump Station Number
   • Green Engineering was awarded the $311,805 contract

July
Ordinance 19-11, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#1)
.    • Amended Audit Contract modified fee – approved $10,000

August
Ordinance 19-12, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#2)
.    • Provide additional funds for Audit Contract – approved $16,976
Ordinance 19-13, Chapter 91: Fire Prevention
Ordinance 19-14, Chapter 154: Flood Damage Prevention

September
Adoption Resolution 19-04, Inventory Assessment Grant Application
Ordinance 19-15, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#3)
   • Provide funds for purchase of property at 796 OBW – approved $349,000

October
Adoption Resolution 19-05, Designation of Applicant’s Agent
Adoption Resolution 19-06, Honor of Veterans Day
Ordinance 19-16, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#4)
.    • Sand search approved $17,565
Ordinance 19-17, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#5)
.    • Provide funds of $51,000 for new pay plan – Not approved

November
Ordinance 19-18, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#6)
.    • Dredging Lockwood Folly Inlet town share $4,600
.       ∗ $37,476 total local share / money already in budget
.    • Dorian depth of closure requirement, $25,400 for surveying and engineering services

December
Adoption Resolution 19-07, NCDEQ Permits


Budget Calendar –
Local governments must balance their budget by a combination of the following:
. 1.
Raising taxes
. 2.
Cutting spending
. 3.
Operating more efficiently

The Town Manager’s proposed budget is due by June 1st
Commissioners must adopt budget no later than June 30th for the next fiscal year

Adopting the annual budget is a primary responsibility of the Board.

This is what I’d like to see the budget process look like starting in January –
. 1.
Monthly Meetings / Workshops
. 2.
Board Goals
. 3.
Review Capital Improvement Plan
. 4.
Staff presentations – wants / needs / revenue streams / cost cutting measures
. 5.
Review Towns current level of services provided – change /add / delete
. 6.
Review staffing and compensation package
. 7.
Line by line review of the budget
. 8.
Appropriate funds for the following:
.    
Beach Nourishment
.     • Dredging
.    
Infrastructure Reserves – Water System / Sewer System / Roads & Sidewalks


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