11 – Town Meeting

Lou’s Views

“Unofficial” Minutes & Comments


BOC’s Special Meeting 11/12/21

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet » click here 

Audio Recording » click here


1. Discussion & Possible Action on the Purchase of the Pier Property – Commissioners Sullivan & Kwiatkowski

Commissioner Sullivan made a motion to go back to the seller and ask for a reduction of $500,000 based on the findings of the ATM inspection report. The inspection was not done under water, the estimated cost to correct the above water damage will cost between $500,000 to $750,000.

Commissioner Murdock articulated why we should proceed with this purchase. He stated that the proposed paid parking program will provide a significant revenue stream which will offset a significant amount of the cost of acquiring these properties.

Commissioner Kwiatkowski once again asked for the projected revenues and expenses before she could support purchasing the pier properties.

It was a spirited discussion. It’s a complicated issue with no simple solution.

Mayor Holden said he feels obligated to make everyone aware that all the pier properties for sale are under contract for considerably more money.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


It’s difficult to support the proposed purchase of the pier properties until we know the following:
.

        1. What is the business plan?
        2. What is the intended use of the property?
        3. How do they plan to pay for it?
          * Projected revenues and expenses
        4. What is this going to cost property owners either with taxes or an assessment?

2. Executive Session Pursuant to North Carolina General Statute 143-318.11(A)(5), To Instruct the Staff or Agent Concerning the Negotiation of the Price and Terms of Contracts Concerning the Acquisition of Real Properties – Mayor Pro Tem Brown & Commissioner Murdock

No decision was made – No action taken

This is the list of properties currently being considered for acquisition by the Town –
Seven (7) pier properties currently under contract
Block Q
Parcels 232NH002, 232NH003, 232NB014, 232NB015, 232NB021, 232NB022   

To View Parcels » click here

      • Brunswick County – Basic Search
      • Select Parcel Number
      • Enter Parcel Number
      • Click Owner Name
      • Click View Map for this Parcel

BOC’s Regular Meeting 11/16/21

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet click here

Audio Recording » click here


1. Public Comments on Agenda Items

There were comments made at the meeting
In addition there are a significant number of comments posted on the Town website
For more information » click here

Most of the comments were regarding the pier purchase

HBPOA Survey234 responses so far

    • Do not purchase the pier without a plan for what we are going to do with it and how much it will cost (82%)
    • Do not increase taxes to cover costs associated with the pier (72%)
    • Set a limit on the amount of parking to protect the character of the island (95%)
    • Do not purchase more property for parking (75%)
    • Do not allow ROW parking in front of private properties (90%)
    • Allow owners to use posts and ropes (90%)
    • Do not incur any additional debt without a public vote (78%)
    • Be more transparent in decisions regarding the use of taxpayer funds (87%)

2. Presentation of Fiscal Year 2020 – 2021 Audit Results – Elsa Watts, Martin Starnes and Associates (Town Manager Hewett)

Audit Results
For more information » click here

Financial Highlights
· The assets and deferred outflows of resources of the Town of Holden Beach exceeded its liabilities
and deferred inflows of resources at the close of the fiscal year by $33,125,393 (net position).
· The government’s total net position increased by $2,431,774, primarily due to an increase in the governmental activities of $2,402,464 and increases in the business-type activities of $29,310.
· As of the close of the current fiscal year, the Town of Holden Beach’s governmental funds reported combined ending fund balances of $13,867,944, an increase of $959,559 in comparison with the prior year. Of this amount, $2,814,661 is available for spending at the government’s discretion.
· At the end of the current fiscal year, unassigned fund balance for the General Fund was $3,038,385, or 98%, of total General Fund expenditure.

Update –
Auditor’s report for fiscal year 2020 – 2021 audit was presented by Elsa the project manager. Audit was submitted to Local Government Commission timely and approved with no changes. The auditor Martin Starnes was able to render an unmodified/clean opinion; which is the best possible opinion that you can receive.


3. Discussion/Question and Answer on the Audit Committee Message on the External Audit Report to the Board of Commissioners – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Agenda Packet – pages 8-9
Overall Long-Term Debt
As of June 30, 2021, the Town of Holden Beach had total debt of $10,100,771 (excluding compensated absences). There was a net decrease in total debt of $875,865. The key factor of this decrease was the scheduled repayment of debt.

Update –
The Audit Committee reviewed the audit and submitted a two-page memo that covers what the public most often have wanted to know about the audit.


4. Annual Monitoring Report – Fran Way, ATM (Assistant Town Manager Ferguson)

Agenda Packet – pages 10-18
The Town participates in annual beach monitoring to maintain a healthy beach and dune system and to keep our engineered beach status. These reports are also instrumental in serving as a baseline account of sand volume as compared to post-storm surveys. Mr.Fran Way with ATM is here to present data from the annual report and highlight changes since last year.

Ongoing Beach Management Activities

      • USACE 50-yr study
      • Florence/Michael Mitigation
      • Dorian Mitigation
      • Issaias Mitigation
      • LWFIX & Bend-Winder
      • LWF Outer Channel Dredging/Navigation

Applied Technology Management
ATM is a coastal engineering firm hired by the town to do the following:

      • Annual monitoring, data collection and reporting
      • Assess sand erosion
      • Evaluate nourishment
      • FEMA projects cost reimbursement support
      • Meet government regulatory permitting conditions

Annual monitoring has occurred since 2001. We have an engineered beach – which means it has been nourished and is being monitored.

Update –
Fran Way presented the annual beach monitoring report. They have completed the annual survey of the beach strand. Primarily they make sure the beach is healthy. Most sections of the beach strand are stable and had accretion compared to baseline conditions comparison. Beach equilibration has occurred, projects are designed to include a volume of sand that the waves and currents will transport offshore to fill in the lower parts of the beach profile. Some of the sand lost off shore has been come back in to the system. Ongoing beach management activity has made the beach strand wider and healthier than it was twenty years ago. In the engineered portion of the beach strand, we are basically looking at another FEMA mitigation nourishment project similar in size to the last Central Reach Project. The good news is that we are starting with a much wider beach strand there than we did then. Under federal and state law, dredging projects have to be performed within a limited environmental window. Contractors have between Nov. 16 and April 30 for all projects because of the sea turtle and shorebird nesting seasons

Beach nourishment profile equilibration:
What to expect after sand is placed on a beach
Read more » click here


5. Discussion and Possible Action on Audit Committee Proposed Revised Ordinance 30.26, Audit Committee (Ordinance 2132) – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Agenda Packet –
pages 19-23
This appears to be another complete rewrite

Update –
Audit Committee reviewed the existing Ordinance. They attempted to make it more representative of what they believe should be there focus. Motion was made that the  revised Ordinance as written be approved.

A decision was made – Approved (3-2)
Commissioners Brown and Smith voted against the motion

This is like the umpteenth time we have rewrote this Ordinance.

How many times do we need to go through this exercise?


6. Discussion and Possible Action on Request for Beer Garden and Signage for Run HB – Johnna Terragna (Assistant Town Manager Ferguson)

Agenda Packet – pages 24-26
Coastal Race Productions is requesting a banner, vendors. and a beer garden as part of the January 29, 2022, race. These items have been allowed as part of the race for several years but currently require board action each year. I have spoken with the police chief and no issues were reported with the proposed items at last year’s event.

Coastal Race Productions would like to request special considerations for our January 29th, 2022, Run Holden Beach event:

    • Permission to place an 8×4 ft banner at the island side base of the bridge on Holden Beach Vacations property with their consent and permission one week prior to the event itself.
    • Permission to host a fully contained beer garden requiring us to get a One­ Time Special ABC Permit in the gravel lot near the pavilion under the bridge.
    • Permission to have up to ten vendors or less contained to the Start/Finish line area near the Pavilion and under the bridge during the event times. We will be cleaned up and out of the area by 11:30am.

The eighth annual “Run Holden Beach” event is scheduled on Saturday, January 29th.

For more information » click here

 



Update –
The requests have been allowed before but requires Board approval each year. This is the eighth annual fun family race day on Holden Beach. They expect over @1,500 participants this year. All the other towns that the race is held allow both activities. They don’t sell beer, they give one (1) free beer to runners over twenty-one (21) years old at the end of the race. In addition, donations are made to a local non-profit which in our case is to the Turtle Patrol. Police Chief also gave his consent., they have no problem with it either.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


7. Police Report – Chief Jeremy Dixon

Police PatchJeremy made two (2) Public Service Announcements –

  • Hunting season is underway, it is not allowed on the island
  • Scams – be on guard, you need to protect yourself from scammers

If you know something, hear something, or see something –
call 911 and let the police deal with it.


Neighborhood Watch

      • Need to look out for each other and report any suspicious activity
      • Call 911 if you see or hear anything suspicious
      • Fill out Keep Check Request Form if you will be out of town
      • Submit completed Property Registration Form
      • Pickup copy of Protecting Your Home

Crime prevention 101 – Don’t make it easy for them
. a) Don’t leave vehicles unlocked
. b)
Don’t leave valuables in your vehicles
. c)
Lock your doors & windows – house, garage, storage areas and sheds

Keep Check Request Form
. a) Complete the form and return it to the Police Department
. b)
Officers check your property in your absence

Property Registration Form.
. a)
Record of items in your home that have a value of over $100
. b)
Complete the form and return it to the Police Department


8. Parking Committee’s Summary in Response to the Board of Commissioners’ Tasker – Commissioners Murdock & Smith

Agenda Packet – page 27
Otto Connect

      • Implement and maximize paid parking
      • Net Over 1,000 potential parking spaces
      • Update Ordinances

Key takeaway – funds from parking fees should be used to develop parking areas, pay for leases, and improve town/beach access and amenities for owners, renters, and visitors alike.

Otto Parking Presentation

Parking Committee Meeting November 5th
Discussion on Board of Commissioners’ Tasker to the Parking Committee
.   A.
Parking Lots (suggest the committee shows lots and spaces on a town map, color code for a, b, c)
.     a)
What town owned lots currently exist and how many spaces are available for paid parking?
.     b)
What town owned property is suitable for conversion to paid parking before next spring and what is the estimated cost for conversion?
.     c)
What properties (if any) are proposed for purchase and how many spaces will be available for paid parking? What is the estimated cost to purchase, assumed timeframe for establishing the parking lot and cost for conversion?

  B. Financials
.     a)
Rate proposal and date range for paid parking
.     b)
Estimated gross profit associated with A for 2022, 2023 and 2024
.     c)
Estimated initial costs for signage and equipment (show where on map)
.     d)
Estimated expenses associated with A for 2022, 2023 and 2024 (including personnel)
.     e)
Estimated net profit for A for 2022, 2023 and 2024

.   C. Public Communication and Engagement Plan
.          Who, when, where

Presentation by Jim Varner, Otto Parking

Preparation of Summary for the BOC’s November 16th Meeting

Previously reported – August 2021
Parking Committee Status & Possible Action – Commissioner Kwiatkowski
Agenda Packet –
The BOCM remit to the parking committee that was unanimously approved has an October deadline. The two (2) meetings since have been cancelled. There may be actions needed to ensure fulfillment of the remit in time for BOC review and decision on implementation of a paid parking program for 2022

Directive was Made: June 15, 2021
Directive to:
Parking Committee
Issue and Action Requested:
In order for paid parking to be successfully rolled out in Spring pf 2022, there are a number of decisions that will need to be made by the BOC before the end of 2021. The Parking Committee is asked to develop a paid parking plan with financials covering the years 2022-2025 in line with the charge questions below.
Background and Potential Implications:
With the continuing popularity and growth of Holden Beach and Brunswick County, parking on the island during many months of the year is increasingly problematic for both visitors and property owners. Additionally, increasing numbers of off island beach goers translate to increasing costs for the Town in terms of trash pickup, facilities maintenance, beach patrol and traffic control.
In order to better organize visitor parking and help defray seasonal costs, the decision has been made to implement a paid parking program starting in Spring 2022. It is important to have a clear description of the parking facilities and cost plus a communication plan for rollout of the paid parking program to avoid miscommunication and confusion.

Charge Questions:

1. Parking Lots (suggest the committee shows lots and spaces on a town map, color code for a, b, c)

a) What town owned lots currently exist and how many spaces are available for paid parking?
b) What town owned property is suitable for conversion to paid parking before next Spring and what is the estimated cost for conversion?
c) What properties (if any) are proposed for purchase and how many spaces will be available for paid parking? What is the estimated cost to purchase, assumed timeframe for establishing the parking lot and cost for conversion?

2. Financials

a) Rate proposal and date range for paid parking
b)
Estimated gross profit associated with 1a, 1b and 1c for 2022, 2023 and 2024
c) Estimated initial costs for signage and equipment (show where on map)
d) Estimated expenses associated with 1a, 1b and 1c for 2022, 2023 and (including personnel)
e) Estimated net profit for 1a, 1b and 1c for 2022, 2023 and 2024

3. Public Communication and Engagement Plan
Who, when, where

Proposed Deadline:
No later than the October BOCM.

Editor’s Note –
Tasker is a formal request to the Committee. It outlines what information that they would like to be included in their report and clarifies their purpose. The intent is to get information needed so that the Board are able to make a decision.


Previously reported – September 2021
The Parking Committee has not met they have cancelled several meetings. Actions are needed for BOC’s to review and make a decision on implementation of a paid parking program for 2022. Patty recommended that at least some of the tasker, charge questions part 1, should be handed off to Town staff since they already have the information. David said “sure” they can do it. Board tasked the Town with preparing information for the next meeting.

Previously reported – October 2021
David reviewed the work done by his staff to do an assessment of paid parking for the island. The attachments are the presentation of their analysis. Essentially what he said to them is that the ball is in the Board’s court now.

Update –
Otto Connect gave paid parking presentation at Parking Committee November meeting.
For more information
» click here

Brian addressed the tasker as follows:

What town owned lots currently exist and how many spaces are available for paid parking?
190 to 221 spaces depending on what you want to include

What town owned property is suitable for conversion to paid parking before next Spring and what is the estimated cost for conversion?
Additional 50 spaces

What properties (if any) are proposed for purchase and how many spaces will be available for paid parking?
In contract for pier properties that would  add 82 spaces
Identified properties for sale that we could purchase
Those properties would provide a significant amount of additional spaces

Rate proposal and date range for paid parking
$4.00 hour or $20.00 day / March 1st through October 31st only

Financials
Projected cost is $1,000 for each parking space
To implement paid parking will cost around $48,000
We could gross in the neighborhood of $293,000 with what spaces we have now

Commissioner Mudock eventually would like to eliminate right-of-way parking and the post and rope in them once we have adequate parking spaces. Brian would like to get to around 500 to 600  parking spaces which would generate additional revenue. It is not their intention to create the over one thousand potential spaces that is in the presentation.                                                                                                                            


9. Update on Revision of Oceanfront Lighting Ordinance – Attorney Madon (Commissioner Smith)

Agenda Packet –
background information was not provided

Previously reported – October 2021
Discussion and Possible Direction to Staff on Oceanfront Lighting
Commissioner Smith in conjunction with the Turtle Patrol wants to address light pollution and restrict oceanfront lighting. Decision was to have our attorney and our building inspector review the ordinances and make a recommendation for any potential changes to the existing ordinances.

Update –
Turtle Patrol representative was scheduled to speak but unfortunately was unable to attend tonight’s meeting.


10. Discussion and Possible Action on Updated Water Fee Schedule – Public Works Director Clemmons

Agenda Packet – pages 28-31
As of January l, 2022, rate Brunswick County will increase wholesale by 82%. the Town’s The current rate is $2.89 per 1,000 gallons, with the new rate being set at $5.25 per thousand gallons. This increase by Brunswick County is to cover the cost of the plant capacity from 24 MGD to 48 MGD and to add a low pressure reverse osmosis treatment system.

Staff is proposing the Town increase our water/sewer rates effective January I , 2022, to reflect the increased amount (Attachment 1). The proposed increase reflects the county’s increase only, with no additional profit to the Town (Attachment 2). Our 202112022 budget supports this increase.

Suggested motion : Approve the proposed water/sewer rates effective January I, 2022, and direct staff to update the fee schedule to reflect the new rates.

Previously reported – February 2021
Agenda Packet –

Brunswick County has been supplying potable water to you and this letter is intended to provide you information to assist in in 2021/2022 budget process.

The County is under construction expanding its potable water capacity and adding advanced treatment to its Northwest Water Treatment Plant. The new facilities will add Low Pressure Reverse Osmosis (LPRO) advanced water treatment and increase capacity from 24 million gallons per day to 48 mgd conventionally treated and minimum 36 mgd LPRO treated water. Brunswick County issued revenue bonds to cover the costs of construction and the debt service is to begin in the next fiscal year.

A water rate study had been performed by financial consultant Raftelis (May 2019) based on the cost-of-service methods out lined in the American Water Works Association M-1 Manual “Water Rates. Fees. and Charges”. This method is now the industry standard for water rate setting. Brunswick County has been using the Producer Price Index (PPI) for wholesale and industrial rate-setting for many years. The Water Rate Study was updated using actual project costs. timing and the projected customer base. and recommends wholesale and industrial rate adjustments.

Staff is recommending that the Brunswick County Board of Commissioners set the wholesale and industrial rate beginning January 1, 2022 using the industry standard for rate setting as follow:

Wholesale – per 1,000 gallons $5.25

Industrial – per 1 ,000 gallons $4.35

Town was advised by the County that they are considering an increase to the water rate. The proposed rate increase would change your monthly bill making it significantly higher. When the wholesale water rate cost goes up it needs to be spread across all users. In addition, we can’t run a deficit so the water system must pay for itself.


Brunswick County ponders water hike next year
Brunswick County commissioners are looking into significant water rate hikes to take effect next Jan. 1. Recommended changes allocate for anticipated debt service repayments that begin in 2022 for $156.8 million in capital improvements at the Northwest Water Treatment Plant, loss in revenue attributed to pending closure of an industrial customer and expected revenue reductions from wholesale customers as well as rate increases for raw water the county buys. Wholesale customers will see rates go up from $2.89 per 1,000 gallons to $5.25, with a monthly base service charge rising $4 for all meters. County rates would still remain lower or comparable with other retail water rates in coastal North Carolina counties, Brunswick County Manager Randell Woodruff said during the regular Brunswick County Board of Commissioners meeting Jan. 19. “It’s key to compare us with other coastal communities,” Woodruff said. “When you look at other coastal communities that have similar issues that we do, under the new rates we are proposing we would still be below the mid-point. That demonstrates that while the rates will be increasing, the customers here will be receiving a much higher quality water system than any in our region.” In 2018, commissioners took action to finance installation of a low-pressure reverse osmosis system at the county’s Northwest Water Treatment Plant to remove chemicals known as perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances(PFAS), like GenX, from water coming from the Cape Fear River. The following year, a Raftelis financial consultant water rate study was completed, with financial forecasts developed in 2020, which was reviewed during the board meeting. According to a Brunswick County newsletter, county retail water rates have seen minimal adjustments over the past 17 years. Commissioners will review and take action on recommended changes as part of the fiscal 2022 budget process, with approved changes going into effect Jan. 1, 2022.
Read more » click here


Water Rate Methodology and Rate Increase

This is what they said in 2019:
About 84% of the county’s residential customers use 5,000 gallons of water a day or less. Accounting for the average 4,500 gallons-per-day customer, using the smallest-sized three-quarter inch meter, an average county water bill increases $3.22 from $25.73 to $28.95

This is what they are proposing in 2021:
Average retail customer billed at 4,500 gallons increases $9.85 from $24.83 to $34.68

The rate increase amount predicted of $3.22 is much less than the current proposed rate increase of $9.85. The average retail customer bill will go from $24.83 to $34.68 which is a 140% increase.


Water Rate Changes
The Brunswick County Board of Commissioners received information on recommended changes to the county’s water rates during its regular meeting this Tuesday, Jan. 19. The Board of Commissioners will review and take action on the recommended changes as part of its Fiscal Year 2022 (FY 2022) budget process. Approved changes would go into effect Jan. 1, 2022. Brunswick County retail water rates have seen minimal adjustments over the past 17 years. The only increase occurred in FY 2015 when the monthly retail base rate was increased by $1. Meanwhile, volumetric rates for retail customers were decreased by $0.90 in both FY 2004 and FY 2020. With the proposed changes, the County’s FY 2022 recommended rates would still remain lower or comparable with other retail water rates in other coastal North Carolina counties. The recommended changes address the anticipated debt service repayments that will begin in 2022 for capital improvements at the Northwest Water Treatment Plant, loss in revenues due to the recent closure of an industrial customer, expected reductions in revenue from wholesale customers, and expected rate increases for raw water the County purchases. The proposed rate changes considered recommendations from the Raftelis water rate study completed in 2019 and subsequent financial forecasts developed in 2020 and reviewed this month. The rate methodology used in the water rate study is in accordance with procedures outlined in the American Water Works Association M-1 Manual, which is the industry standard. In 2018, the Brunswick County Board of Commissioners took action to finance the installation of a low-pressure reverse osmosis system at the County’s Northwest Water Treatment Plant to remove PFAS contaminants like GenX from water from the Cape Fear River. All Brunswick County water customers receive all or part of their water from this facility. The project at the Northwest Water Treatment Plant broke ground in Summer 2020. The facility will increase its conventional treatment capacity from 24 million gallons per day to 45 million gallons per day by Spring 2022. The first five units of the low-pressure reverse osmosis system are expected to begin treating water in Summer 2023 with the final three units anticipated to go online by Fall 2023. Brunswick County has joined other utilities in the region to sue DuPont and Chemours. The County is seeking monetary damages from Chemours to hold it responsible for the millions of dollars it is spending to install a new treatment system necessary to remove PFAS contaminants. The lawsuit remains active and ongoing.
Read more » click here

Previously reported – March 2021
It does not appear that the County plans to do anything at this time to mitigate the significant water rate increase. Working with David they did an assessment of probably what will happen. They laid out what the rate increase implications are for us here at Holden Beach. Bottomline is that we are looking at a significant increase which is much higher than a County residence with the same water usage. We probably need to do a rate study to make sure that revenue and expenditures will stay in balance. Patty read a list of recommended actions and requested authorization to draft a letter to the County stating our issues, concerns, and recommendations regarding the proposed water rate increase. The plan is for her to present a resolution at next month’s BOC’s Regular Meeting agenda for approval.
A decision was made – Approved unanimously

A lot of things going on to try to mitigate the proposed water rate increase
THB Resolution joins the chorus to try and reduce the impact of the increase

  • A decision was made – Approved unanimously

  • Previously reported –
    April 2021
  • Agenda Packet –
    Resolution 21-07:
    A Resolution for Brunswick County to Mitigate Proposed Water Rate Increases
  • .
    NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED
    that the Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach requests the County Commissioners mitigate the dramatic impact on all rate payers of Brunswick County, as was originally envisioned by the County by seeking means to delay approximately 50% of the debt service for an additional 5 years.
    .
    BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that in particular, the County should apply some portion of the $28 million that it will receive under the recently passed American Recovery Act that permits using such funds for “…water, sewer, and broadband infrastructure projects”, money that remains available for use through December 2024, and
    .
    BE IT ALSO RESOLVED that before any decision is taken by Brunswick County on the proposed water rate increases , meetings between County and municipal leaders and staff and parties representing county residents should be held to attempt to arrive at viable solutions to help phase in any proposed rate increase and ensure fairness across all customers vs residents receiving water directly or indirectly from Brunswick County.

Update –
Staff is proposing the Town increase our water/sewer rates effective January I , 2022, to reflect the county’s increase only, with no additional profit to the Town .

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


New Water & Sewer Rates 2022
The new rates are effective as of January 1, 2022. 

The new rates for House meters are as follows:
Base Charges for water is $22.72 and for sewer is $14.10.
This includes the first 2,000 gallons of usage.

For 2,001 – 6,000 gallons, the water rate is $5.46 per 1,000 gallons and $6.46 per 1,000 gallons for sewer.

All usage over 6,000 gallons will be charged $6.45 per 1,000 gallons for water and $7.45 per 1,000 gallons for sewer. 


The new rates for Irrigation meters are as follows:
Base Charge of $5.00 plus a $2.50 inspection fee.  

For the first 6,000 gallons, the water rate is $5.46 per 1,000 gallons and $6.46 per 1,000 gallons for all usage over 6,000 gallons.


  • 11. Discussion and Possible Action on Staff Compensation (Resolution 21-16, Providing COVID-19 Performance Bonuses to Town Staff) – Board of Commissioners

Agenda Packet – page 32
RESOLUTION  21-16
PROVIDING COVID-19 PERFORMANCE BONUSES TO TOWN STAFF

WHEREAS, the virus known as COVID-19 has spread worldwide taking lives and wreaking havoc with economies and disrupting local communities; and

WHEREAS, due to the COVI0-19 global pandemic a state of emergency has existed in North Carolina and specifically within the Town of Holden Beach since March 23, 2020;and

WHEREAS, municipal operations have been severely tested; requiring intermittent and frequent modifications driven by unknown threats to the public health; and

WHEREAS, the Town staff of the Town of Holden Beach has demonstrated extreme competence and been a steadfast source of providing continuous uninterrupted municipal services throughout the State of Emergency; and

WHEREAS, it is the desire of the Holden Beach Board of Commissioners to recognize and reward the hard work and dedication of the Town staff by virtue of providing compensation for same.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED that the Town Manager is authorized and directed to distribute a sum of $750 to each regular full time non-probationary employee of the Town of Holden Beach; said distribution estimated to total $15,750 and to be made from the Governing Body’s Departmental line item in the Budget Ordinance titled “Available to Appropriate”.


County staffers to get special COVID pay
The Brunswick County Board of Commissioners approved in a regular meeting Nov. 1 the Brunswick County Public Service Premium Pay Policy COVID-19 Essential to the tune of more than $2 million. This means eligible employees can get a maximum payment of $2,200 based on the number of months a full-time employee worked between April 1, 2020, and Feb. 28, 2021, when stay-at-home orders occurred. Employees can receive $200 for each month, which is considered tax-deductible income. The Brunswick County human resources and finance departments estimate this will cost $2.4 million. “This proposed premium payment would be in recognition of county staff who continued to support our community and providing essential services during critical time,” county human resources director Melanie Turrise said. She said employees who were working from home or on extended leave for at least one month would be ineligible for that period. Board chairman Randy Thompson asked whether an employee who retired after the period would still be eligible. Turrise said one eligibility requirement is an employee has to be actively working when the premium pay is issued. Former employees would not be eligible. So anyone who retires a few days before commissioners approved the pay would not be eligible. An employee who retires a few days after commissioners approve the pay would be eligible. Commissioner Frank Williams confirmed this was a federal rule written into the legislation President Joe Biden signed March 11, 2021. Commissioner Marty Cooke said the public should know there have been many conversations over this matter and that commissioners have been constrained in what they can do. He added the staff has done exemplary work and helped out. “It’s hard to delineate,” he said, adding staff efforts have been appreciated. The Brunswick County Board of Commissioners approved in a regular meeting Nov. 1 the Brunswick County COVID-19 Essential Public Service Premium Pay Policy to the tune of more than $2 million. This means eligible employees can get a maximum payment of $2,200 based on the number of months a full-time employee worked between April 1, 2020, and Feb. 28, 2021, when stay-at-home orders occurred. Employees can receive $200 for each month, which is considered tax-deductible income. The Brunswick County human resources and finance departments estimate this will cost $2.4 million. “This proposed premium payment would be in recognition of county staff who continued to support our community and providing essential services during critical time,” county human resources director Melanie Turrise said. She said employees who were working from home or on extended leave for at least one month would be ineligible for that period. Board chairman Randy Thompson asked whether an employee who retired after the period would still be eligible. Turrise said one eligibility requirement is an employee has to be actively working when the premium pay is issued. Former employees would not be eligible. So anyone who retires a few days before commissioners approved the pay would not be eligible. An employee who retires a few days after commissioners approve the pay would be eligible. Commissioner Frank Williams confirmed this was a federal rule written into the legislation President Joe Biden signed March 11, 2021. Commissioner Marty Cooke said the public should know there have been many conversations over this matter and that commissioners have been constrained in what they can do. He added the staff has done exemplary work and helped out. “It’s hard to delineate,” he said, adding staff efforts have been appreciated.
Read more » click here

Update –
It is the desire of the Commissioners to recognize and reward the hard work and dedication of the Town staff by virtue of providing compensation, $750 for each employee, for same.

  • A decision was made – Approved unanimously

12. Discussion and Possible Action on a Request for Parks & Recreation Committee Suggestions for the Town-Owned 796 Ocean Boulevard West Property – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Agenda Packet – page 33 – 34
In the new Parks and Recreation Master Plan potential use of 796 OBW as a community recreation resource is highlighted (page 38) with several options for community use, and a proposed budget with no specifics is given (150K in 23/24). In addition, when the property was purchased, the board and staff brainstormed possible uses.

It would be beneficial for the Board to have input from the Parks and Rec Committee on how they envision using 796 OBW in advance of our budgeting for FY 22/23. A list of the top 2 or 3 more complete. Use descriptions with an estimated time needed to upgrade/renovate and estimated total costs for each by the February 2022 BOCM would be helpful to the Board.

THB Parks & Recreation Master Plan / 796 Ocean Boulevard

      • Consider reuse of this structure as a community recreation resource
      • Bathhouse (restrooms/showers)
      • Classroom or exhibit space
      • Rentable meeting space (with kitchen)
      • Improve parking layout
      • Improve accessibility ADA

Previously reported – September 2019
Ordinance 19-15, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#3)
. 1) Provide funds for purchase of property at 796 OBW – approved $349,000
. 2) A significant portion of the cost of acquiring this property is offset by us no longer needing to do additional acoustical engineering.

Previously reported – January 2020
We need to determine what we will do with the building. The first step is deciding how you want to use the property. Pat’s position is that we need to keep building because of noise abatement issues.
Board wanted to hand this off to the Parks & Recreation Committee for them to develop some potential uses.

Basically, we have two options:
. 1) Convert the house into some undetermined community facility
. 2)
Sell and move the house off the property

Poor optics: Are we to understand that they didn’t have a plan when we purchased this property? It was my understanding that the building was going to be removed creating more space between the sewer station and residential properties. Property is not zoned commercial so for starters getting it changed from a residential zone to a commercial zone will take both time and money. Besides that, we would have a huge expense to convert the house into a public facility, in order to comply with Americans with Disabilities Act, we will have ongoing expenses for housekeeping, maintenance, utilities and security issues. Let’s cut our losses and sell the house and have it moved off the property.

Previously reported – February 2020
Agenda Packet –

Directive to:
Parks and Recreation Board

Issue and Action Requested:
The Town purchased 796 OBW, the property next to Sewer Pump Station 3, primarily as a solution for decibel concerns due to proximity. Various potential uses for the property were discussed, including possibilities for public use. It was agreed to defer any decision on the best use of the building to 2020, when a proper plan of action would be determined. With potential public uses of the building in the mix, Parks and Rec is appropriate to lead this effort. Parks and Rec is asked to seek input and recommend possible uses for 796 OBW.

Background and Potential Implications:
When the Town purchased 796 OBW, a number of possible uses for the building were identified as potentially viable, some involving staff use and some public use. Instead of exploring costs for all possibilities, it was decided to defer further evaluation until 2020, when input could be sought and a “short list” of possible uses defined before examining re-modelling and re-zoning implications. Without a pre-screen, internal time and money could be wasted on evaluating facility uses that are not of interest to either staff or our property owners or simply not possible given the nature of the location and/or structure.

Charge Questions:
1. What uses do our residents and property owners envision and prefer?
2. What uses does Town staff envision and prefer?
3. Does proximity of the pumping station impact the viability of the envisioned use?
4. Does proximity to neighboring properties impact the viability of the envisioned use?
5. Is parking going to be adequate for the envisioned use?
6.
What other possible upsides or downsides might be associated with the envisioned use?
7. Will it be possible to request grant money to help defer remodeling and/or maintenance costs for the envisioned use?

Proposed Deadline:
September 2020 BOCM

Most of the discussion was over what the next step should be. It can be characterized as: which comes first the chicken or the egg? The choice between sending it to Parks & Rec Board or sending it to Timbo in Planning & Inspections Department. Between us, this is the same exact discussion we had last month but here we are again. By sending it to the Planning Department first the thinking is that it will help to narrow down the parameters of what we can do there. Once we know what we can do then we can discuss what we would prefer to do. Consensus was to send it to Timbo now and hold off on tasking Parks & Rec Board.

A decision was made – Approved (4-1)
Gerald objected to even asking Timbo because he only sees us incurring big expenses by utilizing the building structure.

Tax records has the building value at $186,710, 50% rule means most you can spend renovating is $93,355

Previously reported – September 2020
We still have no game plan for what we will do with this property that was purchased one (1) year ago.

Previously reported – October 2020
Concerns were expressed about maintenance issues and our insurance liability. Commissioner Murdock felt we need to decide what we are going to do with this property long-term. Timbo offered to do inspection to confirm that it is habitable and reasonably safe. Approved contingent upon Town Inspector favorable report at which time the Town Manager can lease the property to Town employee for $700 per month.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

In February, the BOC’s tasked Planning & Inspections Department to evaluate what we can do there. Where is that report? Oh, so now they want to be landlords. It would seem to me that the risks far exceed the benefits.

Editor’s Note –
Essentially, we are providing a Town employee subsidized housing. Rent is only $700; at that price you can’t even rent a trailer on the mainland.


Update –
The Parks & Rec Master Plan lists a number of options for this facility. The Board is requesting that the Parks & Rec committee prioritizes them and recommend what they envision the building be used for. They would like a response from the committee by the BOC’s scheduled February meeting.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


13. Property Purchase Update & Request for Public Opinion – Commissioners Sullivan & Kwiatkowski

ATM Pier Report
For more information » click here

Agenda Packet – page 35 – 39
Commissioners Sullivan and Kwiatkowski – November Memo
In July we sent you an email outlining how the BOC had arrived at making an offer to purchase the pier properties, parcels 246DB 001 & 002, (July memo below). The original basis for the purchase had been to preserve and use the pier and building much as they have been for many years and maintain both beachgoer and emergency access to the beach. The purpose has become a moving target with, as yet, no proposed use definitively established.

When the original offer was made, it was assumed by a majority of the Board that the purchase could be financed by a combination of grants, paid parking revenue and revenue from leasing the pier and building. How much it would cost to bring the building and pier up to current code and safety standards as well as fair market value for leasing the pier and building were major unknowns flagged in our July message. However, both of us believed we would better understand property value and upgrade costs after due diligence was conducted.

Soon after the contract was sent to the Seller in early July, Commissioner Sullivan proposed that the Board make budgetary arrangements to allow for pier property inspections  Despite the lack of information on the condition of the pier and building, and even though the Commissioners advocating the purchase stated they knew the pier and building were in bad shape, our colleagues were unwilling to do anything until we were under contract. Seller didn’t respond to the contract for almost a month, significantly reducing the amount of time that would be available for due diligence activities, the majority of the Commissioners expressed no interest in planning for inspections. In fact, their position was, and still is, that no matter the condition of the property they would still vote to purchase it. Only after the signed contract was received and Commissioner Kwiatkowski provided a report to the Board and Town staff of another island’s due diligence pier inspection, conducted according to standards adopted by the American Society of Civil Engineer’s, did discussion begin. Two meetings were needed before a budget was proposed adequate to cover inspection of the building and pier, including extra funding to allow at least two additional days of underwater investigations if needed. The property assessment had already been budgeted.

Because the Seller delayed signing the contract, arranging inspections was difficult. The Board determined an extension of the due diligence period, and a later closing date were necessary. The seller demanded an increase in the due diligence money for permitting the change to the due diligence period and closing date. Commissioners Brown, Murdock and Smith over our objection, voted to increase due diligence money by an additional $50,000, In closed session one commissioner offered as justification that the Seller will be responsible for more property tax because closing is pushed into next year. This is true, but the extra taxes are a fraction of the increase.

The Town has now received all the property inspection and assessment reports arranged by Town staff and they are available for review on the Town of Holden Beach website. Unfortunately, despite our (Commissioners Sullivan and Kwiatkowski) best efforts, robust information on the property’s value and condition are still lacking.

The recommended value estimates in the assessment establish market values derived from recently closed and active residential properties. A number of the properties included in the statistical market comparison may not be truly “comparable”, being in gated communities where there is a premium placed on property; three such properties sold for $1.05 million, $750,000 and $620,000. Also questionable is inclusion of the plat next to the pier properties which is being offered by the same seller at $1.09 million.

More important is the pier inspection report. Despite the importance placed by us (Commissioners Sullivan and Kwiatkowski) on below water assessment of the pier pilings, the Board was given an inspection report at the October 19 Board meeting executive session that does not include the level of investigation expected. The report states “Due to weather conditions at the time of inspection, underwater visual and tactile inspections were limited”. Later in the report it is stated the divers “attempted to perform diving operations on the piles, but due to the state of the sea it was unsafe to continue. Alternatively, all upland piles were inspected, and a hands-on tactile inspection performed on the accessible piles by wading into the wave break until water depths exceed 5 feet.” We do not question the choice to limit the inspection for safety reasons; however, there was no communication to the Board that this was the case between the September 21 inspection date and October 19 when we received the report. This is disappointing, as there has been good weather in October, and it was for the specific possibility of unfavorable weather conditions that we added extra funds to the budget to allow for additional dive days. However, even with limited investigation, the report states that the pier,”” Based on the available information provided to ATM and the preliminary results of our inspection, the Holden Beach fishing pier has likely surpassed its remaining service life considering it was constructed in 1957, which is 64 years old. Most fixed timber pier structures are constructed for a 50-year life span with regular maintenance.” (emphasis added). The report states further,” The nature of the due diligence inspection is to provide a high-level condition assessment of the facility, with a limited number of elements inspected only visually and tactilely. Prior to  making repairs, future functionality of the facility  needs to be determined and a feasibility study performed. Once facility functionality is determined , a design level inspection of the facility should be performed to confirm suitability for future operations.” (emphasis added). Based on the above cited sections of the Holden Beach Oceanfront Pier Due Diligence Inspection Report, it is clear that we cannot, at this time, make a reasonable estimate of the full cost to repair and maintain the pier, nor what it can be used for. In addition, based on the current condition of the pier, if the Town makes the purchase, it will need to be closed until repairs to pilings and railings are made which will cost AT LEAST 500-750 thousand dollars (ATM staff believes that the estimated costs for repairs is too low, particularly when considering current construction prices) to extend the lifetime of the pier by 10 to 15 years.

With less than 2 weeks until due diligence closes, it is Commissioners Sullivan and Kwiatkowski’s opinion that there is still insufficient information on property value, the pier’s condition and the estimated time and money needed to have a functioning pier and building open for business. You as property owners and voters deserve to have a clear presentation of an estimated ultimate cost for both the property purchase and improvements and a fact-based proposal of how it will be paid for.

We encourage you to make your thoughts known to the Board. Every member of the Board has asked for input and guidance from the public on this difficult issue. At the September Board of Commissioners Meeting a representative of the Holden Beach Property Owners Association (HBPOA) addressed the Board, he informed the Board that HBPOA conducted a survey and received 345 responses, approximately 82% of which supported HBPOA’s position not to support the purchase of the pier absent the inspection results, the intended use, including beach access, a 15 year plan for the estimated revenues and expenses, including repairs, improvements, insurance and operating costs, the impact on taxes. HBPOA did not oppose the purchase, but rather stated it needed the desired information prior to making a decision.

Commissioner Murdock took the position that a survey can be skewed in favor of a desired outcome and therefore determined it was not useful for determining the public’s true feelings. Therefore, we ask you, whether in favor of or opposed to the purchase under the current circumstances, as interested individuals, to make your thoughts known to the Board by stating your name, address, and opinion and/or position in an email to the Town Clerk. Alternatively, you can make a public comment in person at the November 15th  Board of Commissioners’ Meeting. After November 19, when due diligence closes, the Town is legally obligated to make the purchase unless the Town cannot arrange the financing for the purchase.

Commissioners Sullivan and Kwiatkowski – July Memo
The Town of Holden Beach is in the process of negotiating for the purchase of a portion of the property adjacent to the pier. Background to why discussions began and what has transpired as well as current status and state of knowledge are summarized below.

For the past few years, the Town has been granted a license by the owners to use the western most twenty (20) feet of the overall property (west of the RV park) as an emergency vehicle access point to the beach strand. The need for this type of access is important for the health and safety of everyone who uses the beach. The pier property has been listed for sale and of course the sale would include the currently licensed property. Not wanting to lose the vital access to the strand, the Board first focused on purchasing the licensed property; the eventual offer was not accepted by the seller. As a result of additional executive session discussions, a majority decision was taken by the Board to also explore purchasing the property containing the pier and building, specifically parcel 246DB001. After a period of negotiation, during which the owner did not accept the Town’s offer for the licensed access, the owner offered to sell the Town the parcel on which the pier and building are situated as well as a parcel adjacent to the building and extending fifty (50) feet west (parcel 246DB002). A verbal agreement on an acceptable price and due diligence and escrow amounts has been reached.

The desired outcome is for the pier, café, and land they are situated on to be preserved and used much as they currently are after any necessary improvements to meet code. The Board’s objective is that the purchase be financed by revenues generated by the property coupled with available grant money, resulting in no property tax implications, but of course there is no guarantee.

Some key considerations and assumptions made during the negotiation process follow.

.  1. The purchase of parcel numbers 246DB001 and 246DB002 encompasses approximately 350 feet of ocean front property, containing the pier, building and an estimated 70 parking spaces.

2. There is ample space for an emergency access and ADA compliant walkway.

3. The debt service is approximated to be $250,000 per year, for 15 years.

.  4. It is assumed that the purchase can be financed by a combination of paid parking revenue and leasing the pier and cafe building. If available grant monies can be obtained, the debt service will be less than the estimated $250,000/year. However, each potential revenue stream is merely an assumption and in no way assured.
.     a) There is a question, based on North Carolina statute, whether paid parking can be used for debt service payments. The Town will, as necessary, seek an exception to the statute, but an exception is not guaranteed.
.     b) The proposed conditions of a paid parking program on Holden Beach in 2022 are not yet settled, so currently there is not a reliable revenue estimate for the pier property parking space.
.     c) The fair market value for leasing the pier and cafe is unknown.
.     d) The grants, which can account for from 0% to 30% of the sale price, can only be applied for after the property is purchased, and of course there is no guarantee any grant money will be received.

.   5. Prior to taking ownership of the property, both the pier and cafe building need to be inspected to determine if they are reasonably safe for public use and are Americans with Disabilities Act compliant. The cost of any repairs, upgrades or alterations is unknown. Whatever the costs, they will need to be funded, and there will need to be adjustments made to the just completed 2021/2022 budget ordinance. Any necessary work will need to be contracted and accomplished in the off season if the intent is to be up and running in Spring 2022.

There is a Special Meeting of the Board of Commissioners scheduled for July 8, 2021, at 7pm. at Town Hall to inform the public of the details. We encourage your attendance and participation; for those who cannot attend, you can send comments and questions in advance to the Town Clerk Heather Finnell (heather@hbtownhall.gov) for the BOC to consider.

Previously reported – October 2021

Proposed Pier Property Purchase Information

Appraisal Report

Oceanfront Land Sold –
2018 – 2021 / 18 properties sold average @$530,000
2021 / 5 properties sold average @$592,000
So the appraisal average of $715,000 seems pretty high to me

The ten sold properties used as comps also don’t seem kosher
Half of the properties, five (5) of the ten (10), are in gated communities
More importantly the lot size and dimensions on a number of these lots is significantly larger than what we are considering purchasing at the pier

Engineering Report – Building Assessment

McPherson Engineering Design did assessment
The original section of the building and the east side addition may be demolished.
The west side addition may be able to be salvaged.

Systems Evaluation

Town Building Inspector did assessment
The structure itself is in disrepair, but the west end of this structure may have some real potential and modifications, other portions are practically beyond repair, but have monetary value for improvements.

ATM Pier Inspection Report

The inspection of the timber piles was conducted by a three-person engineer dive team. MidAtlantic attempted to perform diving operation on the piles, but due to the sea state it was unsafe to continue. Alternatively, MidAtlantic inspected all the upland piles and performed a hands-on tactile inspection on the accessible piles by wading into the wave break until water depths exceed 5ft. Piles which could not be safely inspected by a person in the water the piles were visually inspected using a drone. All work was performed in accordance with the ASCE Underwater Investigations Standard Practice Manual, No. 130.

Based on the available information provided to ATM and the preliminary results of our inspection, the Holden Beach fishing pier has likely surpassed its remaining service life considering it was constructed in 1957, which is ~64 years old. Most fixed timber pier structures are constructed for a 50-year life span with regular maintenance. Without maintenance records it is difficult to ascertain when key components such as the pilings were replaced.

One of the key concerns observed during the inspection was the heavily corroded and missing/damaged connection hardware throughout the pier structure. Most connections appear to have more than 50% sectional loss (thereby reducing their strength by 50%).

In order to extend the service life to a reasonably acceptable time, many of the connections and bracing will need total replacement. While the piling may have a longer remaining service life than the other components, significant maintenance and repair of the other key structural components will need to be completed.

Immediate repairs to the pier to extend the service life to a reasonable period of time (10-15 years) is estimated to be on the order of $500,000 to $750,000. This would include replacement or significant repair of the three damaged piles, replacement of the damaged pile caps, installation of new cross bracing and total replacement of corroded fasteners and connections. This estimate assumes that significant material such as decking and stringers can be salvaged, and the construction can be completed by land-based equipment (i.e., no mobilization of barges or water-based equipment).

Update –
Seller indicated that he is unable to respond to request to reduce  the price by the deadline given. The motion is to request they extend due diligence till December 17th with a response required by November 19th. If seller doesn’t extend the due diligence period that we withdraw the offer which would terminate the contract.

A decision was made – Not Approved (2-3)
Commissioners Brown, Smith, and Murdock voted against the motion

The revised motion is to request they extend due diligence till December 17th with a response required by November 19th eliminating the termination verbiage.

A decision was made –
Approved unanimously

Pretty spirited and heartfelt discussion from Commissioners Sullivan and Murdock. Both Commissioner’s articulated their opposing opinions and neither made any headway in persuading the other one. 


Editor’s Note –
This is not how you effectively negotiate a price reduction. As a bare minimum we should be able to get a price reduction for the commission that Alan stated he is not taking for the sale of the properties.


I’d like to say I’m outraged but disappointed will have to suffice. They asked for and got input from the community. It does not appear that the responses are what they wanted so they have been pooh-poohed. The talking point was that the several hundred negative responses are not statistically significant is balderdash. Just to put this in perspective, over the last eight (8) elections the candidate with the most votes averaged just one hundred and ninety-eight (198) votes. So what number does this Board consider to be statistically significant? Most of the public comments do not support the pier property purchase without more information. It would be much easier to make the case that they don’t have a significant amount of community support at this time. Commissioner Sullivan made an excellent point when he said that the Board is beholden to the people that elected them, and they do not have public support to proceed. Unfortunately, this public request for more information appears to be falling on deaf ears.


14. Town Manager’s Report

Seagull Street Paving
Right Angle Engineering plans, design and specs have been finalized.
The project is scheduled for between Easter and Memorial Day. 


Sand Compatibility
Sediment sampling to ascertain its composition of the beach strand has been accepted by the Commission of Coastal Management. Simply put the sand source is compatible and approved for scheduled beach nourishment project.

Previously reported – May 2021
Discussion and Possible Approval of Ordinance 21-12, An Ordinance Amending Ordinance 20-10, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance for Fiscal Year 2020 –2021 (Amendment No. 13) – Assistant Town Manager Ferguson
Agenda Packet –
Division Coastal Management (DCM) added native beach and large sediment sampling criteria to its beach nourishment rules and regulations. Following the announcement of the change, the Town worked with DCM to apply for grant funding. We received notification of funding in the amount of $6,000 and a fully executed contract from the state. We need to recognize the funds in this budget year as the sampling is now a permit condition in the recently issued CAMA permit for the upcoming project.

Sedimentation characterization grant required as one of the conditions for beach nourishment permit. We applied for a $6,000 grant and was awarded that amount, which does not require any matching funds. This also needs to be recognized with the budget amendment proposed.
A decision was made – Approved unanimously


Beach Nourishment Project
We were able to mate two (2) projects, Central Reach and Eastern Reach areas
This is a continuous project of  over five (5) miles, from 262 OBE through 871 OBW
It will cover an area that is:
.      • five (5) miles long
.      • eight (8) feet high
.      • one hundred (100) feet wide
The contract is for placement of sand in that area
We do not know the schedule for the project yet
We also don’t know where they are going to start or in which direction they will work in

In Case You Missed It –



Contractors Information Seminar
The Planning & Inspections Department, supported by the town staff, hosted the nineth annual Contractors Information Seminar on Thursday, November 4th.


Veteran’s Appreciation Luncheon
In the past we have honored Veterans, with a Resolution in Honor of Veteran’s Day and an appreciation luncheon. The Town held its Veterans Appreciation Luncheon outside at Bridgeview Park on Wednesday, November 10th.


National Flood Insurance Program: Reauthorization
Congress must periodically renew the NFIP’s statutory authority to operate. On September 30, 2021, the President signed legislation passed by Congress that extends the National Flood Insurance Program’s (NFIP’s) authorization to December 3, 2021.


Upcoming Events –


Turkey Trot
The Town of Holden Beach will hold its annual Turkey Trot on Thanksgiving morning, November 25th at 8 a.m. Registration is required by calling (910) 842-6488. Please bring a canned food item to donate to a local food bank. 



Tree Lighting
The Town of Holden Beach will hold its annual tree lighting ceremony on Friday, December 3rd at 6 p.m.

 



Run Holden Beach
The eighth annual Run Holden Beach event is scheduled on Saturday, January 29th.



15. E
xecutive Session Pursuant to North Carolina General Statute 143-318.11(A)(5), To Instruct the Staff or Agent Concerning the Negotiation of the Price and Terms of Contracts Concerning the Acquisition of Real Properties – Commissioners Murdock & Smith

16. Discussion and Possible Action on Ordinance 21-33, An Ordinance Amending Ordinance 21-13, The Revenues & Appropriations Ordinance for Fiscal Year 2021 – 2022 (Amendment No. 7) – Commissioner Kwiatkowski
Item was added to the agenda

Audio Recording » click here  

Motion was made to appropriate $850,000 for additional property acquisition   

Moved funds of $850,000
From Revenue account #50.0399.0000 to Expense account#50.0710.7401

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

  Recessed till Friday, October 19th at 2:00pm 


BOC’s Meeting 11/19/21

Audio Recording » click here

Back in session the town attorney informed them that the seller will not give them an extension of the due diligence period nor make an adjustment to the price. Commissioner Sullivan made a motion to terminate the contract.

A decision was made – Not Approved (2-3)
Commissioners Brown, Smith, and Murdock voted against the motion

       Recessed till Monday, October 22nd at 12:00pm     


General Comments –


HBPOA Survey
The HBPOA sends a survey to all property owners on a biennial basis. This is your opportunity to provide input to elected officials regarding your opinions and positions on key issues. If you are a property owner and don’t have the password, you can email them at hbpoa@hotmail.com with your property address and they will send you the link or the password. Your feedback is important.


2021 Municipal Elections Results

Candidate                              Position                    Term               Votes
Alan Holden                            Mayor                         Seventh           71        (unopposed)

Page Dyer                                Commissioner           First                 77        (unopposed)
Rick Smith                               Commissioner           First                 63        (unopposed)
Patricia Kwiatkowski            Commissioner           Third               60        (unopposed)

Congratulations and thanks to our elected officials for their service to the community. 


Editor’s Note –
Off-year elections are often noted for low interest and few voters at the polls. The fact that all four (4) candidates ran unopposed probably explains why we only had eighty-five (85) voters out of eight hundred and twenty-five (825) registered voters or just 10.30% turnout to vote. Surprisingly Page Dyer, who previously had not served in the town government in any capacity, received the most votes and will fill the unexpired commission term, which is just two (2) years.

Election results in 2019 by comparison were as follows:

Candidate                             Position                     Term               Votes
Alan Holden                           Mayor                          Sixth                241      (unopposed)

Gerald Brown                        Commissioner            Second            246
Woody Tyner                        
Commissioner            First                230
Brian Murdock                     
Commissioner            First                225
Mike Sullivan                         Commissioner            Second            182
Patricia Kwiatkowski          
Commissioner            Second            168



        • BOC’s Meeting

          The Board of Commissioners’ next Regular Meeting is scheduled on the third Tuesday of the month, December 21
          st

           


        • I hope your Thanksgiving is filled with family, friends

          and all of the memories that make you thankful!

          November 25, 2021


Hurricane #1 - CR

 

Hurricane Season
For more information » click here

Be prepared – have a plan!

.a.

.

No matter what a storm outlook is for a given year,
vigilance and preparedness is urged.


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