Calendar of Events

Calendar of Events – 2024


Winter


 NA


Spring


Southport Spring Festival
Southport Spring Festival

March 29th & 30th  
Southport

 

Welcome Spring Easter weekend in style at the Southport Spring Festival, a tradition that started in 1996. This festival features a wide variety of activities.
For more information » click here 


N.C. Azalea Festival
N.C. Azalea Festival

April
3rd thru 7th
Wilmington


Wilmington has been celebrating Spring Southern Style since  1948.  There’s something for everyone among their community’s rich array of artwork, gardens, history, and culture. This festival is considered one of the top events in the Southeast.
For more information » click here


Strawberry & Wine Fest



Strawberry & Wine Fest

April 28th
Sunset Beach

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The Strawberry and Wine Festival, hosted by the Old Bridge Preservation Society since 2014. There will be wines available from Silver Coast Winery with strawberries as the main fare of the day. It’s a day of wine, food, entertainment, and craft vendors.  
For more information » click here


Days at the Docks Festival


Days at the Docks Festival
April 27th & 28th
Holden Beach

 

The annual festival which started in the 1980’s occurs in April or May and is sponsored by the Greater Holden Beach Merchants Association. It’s the Holden Beach way to kick-off the Spring and start the vacation season. In addition to the food and arts & crafts, enjoy live music & entertainment, a horseshoe tournament and the world famous “Bopple Race”. Lots of activities for the entire family!
For more information » click here


Blue Crab Festival



Blue Crab Festival

May 18th & 19th

Little River SC

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Little River has been celebrating the World Famous Blue Crab Festival since 1981. It is held on the waterfront in Little River and is one of the largest festivals in the Southeast. The purpose of this festival is one that supports and showcases the fabulous atmosphere of the local communities.

For more information » click here


Summer


Conway Riverfest - CR

Riverfest Celebration
June 29th               

Conway SC

 

Held along the Waccamaw River in downtown Conway the festival celebrates Independence Day since 1980 with music and events for the entire family.
For more information » click here


4th of July Southport - CR 190
N.C. 4th of July Festival
July 4th
   
Southport

 

The patriotic spirit of America is alive and well in the City of Southport. For over 200 years this small maritime community has celebrated our nation’s independence in a big way. Incorporated as the N.C. 4th of July Festival in 1972 the festival committee strives to keep the focus of the festival on honoring our nation’s birthday with a little fun thrown in.
For more information » click here


Battleship Blast 4th of July Celebration


Battleship Blast
4th of July Celebration
July 4th    

Wilmington

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Annual 4th of July Celebration at Riverfront Park in downtown Wilmington since 1981. Featured entertainment will perform from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM, followed by fireworks at 9:05 PM launched from a barge in the Cape Fear River adjacent to the USS North Carolina Battleship. The only place you need to be this holiday is downtown Wilmington for the best view of fireworks.

For more information » click here


Fall


U.S. Open King Mackerel Fishing Tournament
U.S. Open King Mackerel Fishing Tournament
October 3rd thru 5th
Southport

 

The U.S. Open King Mackerel Tournament has taken place since 1979 and is held annually the first week in October. The U.S. Open is one of the largest king mackerel tournaments on the East Coast and part of the SKA (Southern Kingfish Association) Tournament Trail. The tournament now attracts almost 400 boats annually.
For more information » click here


Riverfest
Riverfest

October 5th & 6th
Wilmington        

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Wilmington’s Riverfest is celebrated in October since 1979 and runs from the foot of Market Street to Cape Fear Community College over a half mile of free family entertainment.
For more information » click here


Sunset at Sunset


Sunset at Sunset
October 5th
Sunset Beach

 

Held the first Saturday in October each year, Sunset at Sunset is the Town of Sunset Beach’s Community Block Party.  The annual autumn event has been celebrated since 2007, and is scheduled to happen again this year, in front of Ingram Planetarium on Sunset Boulevard in Sunset Beach.
For more information » click here


               Run Holden Beach
Run Holden Beach

October 5
th
Holden Beach

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Run Holden Beach is part of the BAM! Race Series that started in 2014. The series includes four (4) events that have runs on Holden Beach, Oak Island, Sunset Beach, and Ocean Isle Beach.
For more information » click here 


Oyster Festival Logo - CR

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N.C. Oyster Festival

October
19th & 20th
Ocean Isle Beach

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The annual North Carolina Oyster Festival has been taking place since 1978
. Come celebrate everything Oyster with a variety of foods, crafts, contests, children’s activities, and musical performances at Mulberry Park in Shallotte. Signature Festival events include the Oyster Shucking Contest, Oyster Eating Contest, and Oyster Stew Cook-off.

For more information » click here


N.C. Festival by the Sea

N.C. Festival by the Sea
October 26th & 27th
Holden Beach

 

Hosted by the Holden Beach Merchants Association this annual two-day festival which started in the 1980’s occurs on the last full weekend in October. The festival is kicked off with a parade down the Holden Beach causeway. There is a fishing tournament, horseshoe tournament, and a sandcastle building contest. Vendors provide food, arts and crafts, amusement rides and other activities. There is live musical entertainment both days at the Holden Beach’s Pavilion.
For more information »  click here


North carolina'sDiscover a wide range of things to do in the Brunswick Islands for an experience that goes beyond the beach.
For more information » click here

Guest Information

Guest Information

Town of Holden Beach Website / https://hbtownhall.com/
.     a) Visitors / https://hbtownhall.com/visitors
.     b) Renters Information / https://hbtownhall.com/renters-information

Holden Beach Information Network Website / https://lousviews.com/
    a) Holden Beach Locator
.     b) Tide Tables
    c) Beachcombing Guide
.     d) Concert Schedule
.     e) Dining Guide
.     f) Restaurant Reviews

Quiet Enjoyment:
All parties are expected to act with respect and regard toward all members of the community

Garbage and Trash Removal / https://hbtownhall.com/solid-waste%2Frecycling
Garbage and trash must be placed at the end of the residential driveway no sooner than the night before the day of collection and returned the day after collection
.       a)
Garbage pails – every Tuesday and Saturday (June through September)
.       b)
Curbside Recycling – every Tuesday (June through September)
         * If blue trash can is at property

Day Trip –

Southport / Fort Fisher Ferry Schedule
910.457.6942
https://www.ncdot.gov/travel-maps/ferry-tickets-services/routes/Pages/default.aspx

Aquarium at Fort Fisher
910.772.0500
https://www.ncaquariums.com/fort-fisher

Calendar of Events – Island

Parks & Recreation / https://hbtownhall.com/parks-%26-recreation

Concerts by the Sea –
Free concerts every Sunday at 6:30 p.m. during the summer at the Pavilion
.     a) 
Bring your lawn chair with you
.     b)
Beginning May 29th through September 4th

Tide Dye –
Join us every Tuesday between 1:00 to at 2:00 p.m. at the Pavilion to tie dye your own shirts.
.     a) The cost is $7 per shirt.
.     b) Beginning June 14th through August 9th 

Turtle Talk –
Educational program every Wednesday at 7:00 p.m. at the Chapel
.     a)
Beginning June 29th through August 17th

 Children’s Turtle Time held every Wednesday at 4:00 p.m. at the Chapel
.     a) Crafts, stories and activities for children ages 3 – 6
.     b) All children must be accompanied by an adult
.     c)
Beginning June 29th through August 3rd

A Second Helping –
Program to collect  food Saturday mornings during the summer at the Beach Mart 
a) Food is distributed to the needy in Brunswick County


Island Wide – Rules & Regulations

.     1) Note posted speed limit signs
§ Chapter 71 –Traffic Schedules / Schedule I – Speed Limits

.     2) Observe signs for exact parking prohibitions
.     For more information » https://hbtownhall.com/paid-parking
.       a) No parking on the streets or rights-of-way
         * except in designated parking spaces identified by signs
.       b) Do not leave any portion of vehicle in designated travel lane of any street
      c)
Do not block crosswalks, sidewalks, access ways, driveways, or mailboxes
.       d) No parking within 15 feet of any fire hydrant or emergency vehicle access
§ Chapter 72 –Parking Schedules / Schedule I – Parking Prohibited At All Times

.     3) Fireworks are not allowed on the island
.       a)
Possession of fireworks is a Class 2 misdemeanor
. 
§ 130.15 / Sale or use of fireworks are prohibited


 Beach Strand – Rules & Regulations

1) There are no lifeguards on the beach strand. Rip tides are dangerous. When swimming, if     you get caught in a rip tide pulling you away from shore, swim parallel to the shoreline until you get out of the current — do not try to swim against the current back to shore.

2)  Keep off the dunes

3)
All beach equipment must be removed from the beach by its owner or permitted user on a daily basis between the hours of 6pm and 7am.
§ 94.06 / Placing obstructions on the beach strand

4) Pets are not allowed on the beach strand from May 20th to September 10th
.    • During the hours of 9:00am through 5:00pm daily
§ 90.20 / Responsibilities of owners
a)
Pets must be on a leash at all times on the island.
b)
Owner’s need to clean up after their animals (It’s their doody!)

5) It is unlawful to dig into the sand on any part of the beach strand greater than 12 inches deep, without having a responsible person attending the area. Prior to leaving the area, any hole greater than 12 inches deep shall be filled to be level with the surrounding area, leaving the area in the same general condition in which it was found.
§ 94.05 / Digging of holes on beach strand

6) Alcoholic beverages are not allowed anywhere on the beach strand.
§ 130.03 / Sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages prohibited

7) Trash receptacles are placed along the beach for your convenience
  a) P
lease do not litter.
§ 130.30 / Littering prohibited

8) Only emergency and official Town Staff vehicles are allowed to drive on the beach.
§ 94.01 / Official vehicles allowed on beach strand
§ 94.02 / Privately owned vehicles prohibited on beach strand

9) If you want to fish a North Carolina Coastal Recreational Fishing License is required, please be courteous to those swimming and relaxing nearby.

Beachcombing Guide

Beachcombing Guide

Coastal treasures commonly found on the beach strand at Holden Beach

Angel Wings
Auger
Babys Ear
Banded Tulip
Bay Scallop
Calico Clam
Calico Scallop
Cockle
Coquina Clams
Coral
Cross-barred Venus
Cross-hatched Lucine
Disk Dosinia
Eastern Oyster
Elegant Dosinia
Florida Horse Conch
Imperial Venus Clam
Jackknife
Jingles
Keyhold Limpet
Kitten’s Paw
Lion’s Paw
Moon Snail / Sand Collar
Murex
Northern Quahog
Olive
Oyster Drillers
Pen Shell
Periwinkles
Ponderous Ark
Sand Dollars / Sea Biscuit
Scotch Bonnet
Sea Urchin
Shark Tooth
Slipper Snail
Soft Shelled Clam
Southern Quahog
Spiny Jewel Box Clam
Starfish
Sunray Venus
Surf Clam
Turkey Wing Ark Clam
Whelks
Whelks Egg Case Strings
Wing Oyster


Angel Wings
Pholadidae, commonly referred to as angel wings or piddocks, are a family of bivalve mollusks similar to a clam. Angel wings are chalky white in color and measure four to eight inches in length. The muscles fusing the shell’s valves together are weak, making it rare to find angel wings with both halves still intact.

Angel Wings


Auger
The Terebridae, commonly referred to as Auger shells or Auger snails, is a group or family of small to large predatory marine gastropods in the superfamily Conoidea. Augers have extremely high spired shells with numerous whorls, and the common name refers to the resemblance of their shells to rock drill-type drill bits.

Auger


Babys Ear
Sinum perspectivum, commonly referred to as baby ear, is a species of predatory sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Naticidae, the moon snails. It has a shallowly coiled shell with a wide opening and graceful curved outline.

Babys Ear


Banded Tulip
Cinctura lilium, commonly referred to as the banded tulip, is a species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Fasciolariidae. This smooth, gracefully shaped beauty has a moderately thin shell. Colors range from pearly gray with splotches of olive green or tan. It may also have dark brown bands in parallel lines around the shell and can be from 2 to 4 inches.

Banded Tulip


Bay Scallop
Argopecten irradians, commonly referred to as the bay scallop, is a marine bivalve mollusk in the family Pectinidae, a species of scallop. The shell of a bay scallop is broadly fan shaped with more than 14 radial ribs. They usually have a molted pattern and come in all sizes and colors. 

Bay Scallop


Calico Clam
Macrocallista maculata, commonly referred to as the calico clam, is a species of bivalve mollusk in the family Veneridae.

Calico Clam


Calico Scallop
Argopecten gibbus, commonly referred to as the Atlantic calico scallop, is a species of medium-sized edible marine bivalve mollusk in the family Pectinidae, the scallops. The shell near the hinge is extended into “ears”, as is the case in all scallops. The fan-shaped shell of the calico scallop has about 20 radial ribs, which are sometimes roughened by growth lines. It is similar in shape and sculpturing to the bay scallop. Though similar the stripes are often more pronounced on the Calico Scallop and is more coveted of the two, as it’s flecked with pretty patches of rose, pink, and red.

Calico Scallop


Cockle
A cockle is an edible, marine bivalve mollusk. Although many small edible bivalves are loosely called cockles, true cockles are species in the family Cardiidae. The distinctive rounded shells are bilaterally symmetrical and are heart-shaped when viewed from the end.

Cockle


Coquina Clams
Donax is a genus of small, edible saltwater clams, marine bivalve mollusks. The genus is sometimes known as bean clams or wedge shells; however, Donax species have numerous different common names in different parts of the world. These shells are small – about the size of a fingernail and is characterized by its smooth surface and its dual shell and come in a rainbow of pastel but brilliant colors.

Coquina Clams


Coral
Marine invertebrates in the class Anthozoa of phylum Cnidaria, come from the shelf edge, approximately 75 miles offshore, known as “Outer Shelf Reefs.”. Coral are reef builders that inhabit oceans and secrete calcium carbonate to form a hard skeleton.

Coral


Cross-barred Venus
Chione cancellata, is a species of medium-sized saltwater clam, a marine bivalve mollusk in the family Veneridae, the venus clams. The cloudy white to yellow-white shells are highly distinctive, with raised, bladelike concentric ridges superimposed on strong radial ribs and giving the shells their characteristic cancellate (crisscrossed) appearance.

Cross-barred Venus


Cross-hatched Lucine
Divaricella quadrisulcata, commonly referred to as the cross-hatched lucine, is a species of bivalve mollusk in the family Lucinidae. They are generally white in color and have a little tip at one end of their circular shell.

Cross-hatched Lucine


Disk Dosinia
Dosinia discus, commonly referred to as the disk dosinia, is a species of bivalve mollusk in the family Veneridae. They are white, flattened, and nearly circular. There are numerous fine concentric ridges with a varnish like layer that covers the shell.

Disk Dosinia


Eastern Oyster
Crassostrea virginica, commonly referred to as the eastern oyster may also be called the east coast oyster. Like all oysters, it is a bivalve mollusk with a hard shell, which protects it from predation. This particular type of oyster has an important environmental value because it is a filter feeder, cleaning the water around them.

Eastern Oyster


Elegant Dosinia
Dosinia elegans, commonly referred to as the elegant dosinia, is a species of bivalve mollusk in the family Veneridae.

Elegant Dosinia


Florida Horse Conch
Triplofusus papillosus, commonly referred to as the Florida horse conch, is a species of extremely large predatory sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Fasciolariidae. Although known as a horse conch, this is not a true conch, this species is the largest gastropod in the American waters.

Florida Horse Conch


Imperial Venus Clam
Lirophora latilirata, commonly referred to as the imperial venus clam, is a bivalve mollusk in the family Veneridae. The shell is rounded, triangular and well-inflated, with large, heavy concentric ridges which are often sharply shelved at the top.

Imperial Venus Clam


Jackknife
Ensis leei, commonly referred to as the jackknife clam is a large edible marine bivalve mollusk. This shell is most noted for its length. It is primarily a silver, gray color and is shaped like a straight razor. It is primarily a silver, gray color and is shaped like a straight razor. Also known as a razor clam, it gets its name from the rim of the shell being extremely sharp.

Jackknife


Jingles
Anomia is a genus of saltwater clams, marine bivalve mollusks in the family Anomiidae. They have translucent shells and are commonly known as Jingle Shells because when a handful of them are shaken they make a jingling sound.

Jingles


Keyhold Limpet
Fissurellidae, are limpet-like sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the clade Vetigastropoda. The name comes from the small hole in the apex of their cone-like shells. It looks like a volcano with a single hole at the peak.

Keyhold Limpet


Kitten’s Paw
Plicatula gibbosa, commonly referred to as the  kitten’s paw, is a species of bivalve mollusk in the family Plicatulidae. The shell resembles the foot of a kitten, it is fan shaped with distinct wavy ribs on the outside.

Kitten’s Paw


Lion’s Paw
Nodipecten nodosus, commonly referred to as the lion’s paw scallop, is a species of bivalve mollusk in the family Pectinidae. The shell’s common name is derived from its appearance, the color, and the knobs giving it some visual similarities to the paw of a lion.

Lion’s Paw


Moon Snail
Naticidae, are predatory sea snails, marine gastropod mollusks in the clade Littorinimorpha. They will attack almost any other shelled mollusk they encounter in the sand, including other moon snails. They are broad, circular shells that feature a central spiral that gets larger until it reaches an equally circular opening. Also called a shark eye, it has four to five whorls that spiral inward to form the “eye”.

Moon Snail


Moon Snail – Sand Collar
Sand collars are the characteristic egg masses of one family of sea snails, the moon snails. These egg masses are often found washed up either whole, or sometimes in fragments, on sandy beaches where moon snails are living.

Moon Snail - Sand Collar


Murex
Murex is a genus of medium to large sized predatory tropical sea snails. These are carnivorous marine gastropod mollusks in the family Muricidae, commonly referred to as murexes or rock snails. This genus includes many showy members, their elongate shells highly sculptured with spines or fronds.

Murex


Northern Quahog
Mercenaria mercenaria, commonly referred to as a quahog, round clam, or hard-shell clam, is an edible marine bivalve mollusk that is native to the eastern shores of North America. The shell is thick with fine concentric rings. It is one of many unrelated edible bivalves that in the United States are frequently referred to simply as clams.

Northern Quahog


Olive
Olividae, commonly referred to as olives, are marine gastropod mollusks in the family Olividae. They are carnivorous sand-burrowers in the taxonomic family of medium to large predatory sea snails. With smooth, shiny, cylindrical shaped shells these shells are distinctive for their tight spiral top, their long and skinny opening, and their modest size. They are also the official state shell of South Carolina.

Olive


Oyster Drillers
Urosalpinx cinerea, commonly referred to as the oyster drill or eastern oyster drill, is a species of small predatory sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Muricidae, the murexes or rock snails. The oyster driller is a small, predatory snail with a pointed, ribbed shell. The oyster driller grows to about one inch in length. Its oval-shaped shell varies in color from gray or purplish to tan or yellowish-white and has a pointed spire or tip. The shell has five to six raised whorls; brown, spiraling vertical ribs; and a thin, flared lip with small teeth.

Oyster Drillers


Pen Shell
Pinna nobilis, commonly referred to as the noble pen shell or fan mussel, is a large species of Mediterranean clam, a marine bivalve mollusk in the family Pinnidae. Its shape differs depending on the region it inhabits. Delicate and beautiful they are distinctive for its iridescent exterior which can exude a rainbow of colors in the light.

Atrina serrata, or saw-toothed pen shell; thin and fragile, it has a that’s ridged and colored a deep, smoky brown.

Atrina rigida, commonly called the rigid pen shell; they have a long, triangular, or wedge-shaped shell. They are a brown or purplish-brown color and have 15 or more radiating ribs that fan out across the shell.

Pen Shell


Periwinkles
Littorina littorea, commonly referred to as the common periwinkle is a species of small edible whelk or sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk that has gills and an operculum, and is classified within the family Littorinidae, the periwinkles. These shells are distinctive for their conical shapes and intricate forms.

Periwinkles


Ponderous Ark
Noetia ponderosa, commonly referred to as the ponderous ark clam, is a clam in the family Noetiidae. Ponderous Ark


Sand Dollars
Sand dollars are species of flat, burrowing sea urchins belonging to the order Clypeasteroida. Some species within the order, not quite as flat, are known as sea biscuits. This round sea urchin is tan to light brown, have a fivefold radial pattern, and its five slots resemble keyholes. The sand dollar you find on the beach is actually the skeleton of a variety of sea urchin. Dead Sand Dollars are commonly found with their empty test devoid of all surface material and bleached white by sunlight. Living Sand Dollars, those that are brown or green and sport fuzz, should be gently returned to the sea.

Sand Dollars

Sea Biscuit
Fossilized Sand Dollars

Sea Biscuit


Scotch Bonnet
Semicassis granulate, commonly referred to as the Scotch bonnet, is a medium-sized to large species of sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the subfamily Cassinae. The common name “Scotch bonnet” alludes to the general outline and color pattern of the shell, it is named for its resemblance to the caps and plaid worn by the Scottish. This gorgeous shell features a conical shape, with a ridged body often covered with brown speckles. Scotch bonnets, especially intact ones, are an incredibly rare find. They are also the official state shell of North Carolina.

Scotch Bonnet


Sea Urchin
Arbacia punctulate, has a flattened, globular, calcareous shell made up of skeletal plates.

Sea Urchin


Shark Tooth
Sharks continually shed their teeth. Coastal North Carolina is a hot spot for shark teeth because sharks live along the coast and the region is situated above fossil deposits.

Shark Tooth


Slipper Snail
Crepidula fornicata, commonly referred to as the slipper snail, boat shell, quarterdeck shell, fornicating slipper snail and slipper limpet. This is a species of medium-sized sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk in the family Calyptraeidae. The sea snail has an arched, rounded shell.  On the inside of the shell there is a white “deck”, which causes the shell to resemble a boat or a slipper.

Slipper Snail


Soft Shelled Clam
Mya arenaria, commonly referred to as soft-shell clams, popularly called steamers, softshells, piss clams, Ipswich clams, or Essex clams are a species of edible saltwater clam, a marine bivalve mollusk in the family Myidae. These shells are very thin and easily broken, hence the name “soft-shells.” They can be white, cream, brown, gold, or gray.

Soft Shelled Clam


Southern Quahog
Mercenaria campechiensis, commonly referred to as a southern quahog, is a genus of edible saltwater clams, marine bivalve mollusks. It is a large member of the Venus Clam family Veneridae that may grow to be 6 inches in size. The species is very similar to the northern quahog.

Southern Quahog


Spiny Jewel Box Clam
Arcinella cornuta, commonly referred to as the spiny jewel box clam, is a species of bivalve mollusk in the family Chamidae. The shell itself is thick and heavy for its size. Fresh shell specimens will have more distinct erect tubular spines on the 7-9 rows (ribs) across the shell, radiating from the beak. The shells are commonly found on southern beaches, but most of the spines have been broken off by the surf.

Spiny Jewel Box Clam


Starfish
Asterias rubens, commonly referred to as the common starfish, which is not a fish but are star-shaped echinoderms. Belonging to the family Asteriidae, the common starfish normally has five arms, broad at their base and gradually tapering to a point at their tips, which are often turned up slightly.

Starfish


Sunray Venus
Macrocallista nimbosa, commonly referred to as the sunray venus clam, is a species of bivalve mollusk in the family Veneridae.

Sunray Venus


Surf Clam
Spisula solidissima, commonly referred to as the surf clam, bar clam, hen clam or skimmer. It is a very large, edible, saltwater clam, or marine bivalve mollusk in the family Mactridae.

Surf Clam


Turkey Wing
Arca zebra, commonly referred to as the turkey wing ark clam, is a bivalve mollusk in the family Arcidae, the ark clams.

Turkey Wing


Whelks
Whelks are a species of large predatory sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusk, a busycon whelk, belonging to the family Busyconidae. Often mistaken for conch shells, whelks are noted for being striking in appearance. They have conical shapes with spiral tops, and often have wide openings. Depending on the species, some shells have spikes or ridges towards the top. The three most common varieties of whelks include Lightning Whelks, Knobbed Whelks and Channel Whelks. To identify the Lightening Whelk from the Channel Whelk, remember this: Lightening’s open on the left, and Channeled Whelks open on the right.

Whelks

Lightning Whelks are similar appearance to the Knobbed Whelk but with a left-side opening. This means the snail is left-handed and the body is on the left as it travels forward with the spire in the rear.

Lightning Whelks

Knobbed Whelks have several triangular knobbed spirals that taper to a long siphon canal.

Knobbed Whelks

Channeled Whelks are easy to classify with its deep channeled spirals and weak knobbs, if any.

Channeled Whelks


Whelks Egg Case Strings
Whelks lay their eggs in a long, spiral-shaped casing that can reach up to 33 inches in length. The strand contains up to 200 small pouches, and each pouch contains up to 99 eggs. The female protects the string of eggs by anchoring one end at the bottom of the ocean.

Whelks Egg Case Strings


Wing Oyster
Pteria colymbus, commonly referred to as the winged oyster is a species of bivalve mollusk in the family Pteriidae. The wing oyster has a distinctive, asymmetric shape. It has a long straight hinge with one wing drawn out a long way and the other one much smaller. On the beach, they look like a broken cockle shell, if you don’t notice the wings.

Wing Oyster