07 – Town Meeting

Lou’s Views

Town Meeting 07/10/18

“Unofficial” Minutes & Comments


Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet
For more information
» click here


1. Public Comments on Agenda Items

Two people made the case for having a four way stop at Carolina Avenue and Halstead


2. Corps Status Update: Brunswick County Beaches GRR Study – Pam Castens Agenda Packet –
The CORPS’ Brunswick County Beaches project remains open, despite not advancing in several years. The CORPS is invited to update the BOC on the project, its history, a path forward including costs, and a timeline/feasibility of continuing the study.

The CORPS released several publications of studies since the project’s inception in approximately 1997. The project represents a CORPS’ coastal storm damage reduction (CSDR) effort for Holden Beach, Caswell Beach, and Oak Island. This project is currently several years behind schedule.

General Reevaluation Report 
The Brunswick County Beaches General Reevaluation is investigating measures and plans for the single purpose of coastal storm damage reduction. The study is also documenting incidental recreation benefits. Located between Cape Romaine and Cape Fear, Brunswick County is a frequent landfall site for hurricanes and tropical storms tracking along the mid-Atlantic coast. In addition to direct land-falling storms, many other storms have passed offshore and impacted the study area. Local impacts to the study area have varied depending on the landfall location and strength of the storm.
For more information » click here

Well this is embarrassing – they were a NO SHOW


 3. Annual Update / Fire Fees Update – Fire Chief Doug Todd
Agenda Packet –
Over the past few years, Fire Chief Doug Todd has provided the Town with an annual update in the beginning of the summer season.  We have asked Chief Todd to attend the July 10th meeting and to provide the Board with a brief annual update and information on fire fees.

Tri-Beach Fire Department substation is located at the corner of Starfish and OBW. The Fire Department responded to two hundred and seventeen (217) calls on the island in 2017. The Fire Department staffs the substation with two men for twelve hours daily during peak seasonal demand from Memorial Day to Labor Day, during the daytime for the hundred (100) days of the summer. They have improved their average response time since they started staffing the island. The emergency vehicle beach strand access located diagonally across the street from the fire station has improved emergency response times on the beach strand too.

Help emergency responders find you
by
putting address marker on your mailbox


4. David Hutnik, Guest Speaker – Discussion and Possible Action to Allow Vendors and One Free Beer using Ticket at Run Holden Beach on 9/15/2018 –
Commissioner Fletcher and Commissioner Freer
Agenda Packet –
David Hutnik is one of the owners of Coastal Race Productions. They are a local Brunswick County company that manages all of the larger marathons and 5K’s in the area.  This will be the 5th year for Run Holden Beach event coming up on 9/15 and they already had over 1,000 runners pre-register from 24 different states.  They are expecting a record crowd again with over 1500 runners that bring a total of around 4,000 people here including family and friends of runners.

Coastal Race Productions are requesting:

Permission allowing them to have vendors sell during the Run Holden Beach event from 7am- I 2am on 9/15/2018.  Most larger races sell sponsorships and these sponsors like to sell their race related shirts/nutrition after the event to participants.  Much like a festival but geared toward runners. This would take place and be contained to the area surrounding the amphitheater and Jordan Blvd only.


Permission to host a contained area where runners only (over the age of 21) will be given a beer ticket and will not be selling or giving out additional beer.

Plans for the contained beer garden:

  • Coastal Race Productions check ID’s at packet pickup when runners receive their shirt, bib and beer wristband with over 21 ID.
  • Coastal Race Productions will contain the beer garden to a limited area, proposed next to amphitheater ­ see diagram below.
  • Coastal Race Productions will have volunteers serving this from a trailer with beer taps provided from our vendor RA Jeffries that they use at all of our other events.
  •  Coastal Race Productions obtain a special event permit through the ABC commission, hold the required insurance and are happy to list the town as additionally insured.

* It’s important to note that this is a family friendly event and they take pride in offering the best runner experience possible. They keep this controlled and contained and monitor it very closely.

 Other notes about the race this year:

1) Coastal Race Productions have been working closely with town officials, DOT, & sanctioning to make major changes to our route with increased traffic control and coning with less impact on roads for

2) Coastal Race Productions work closely with the town businesses to make this great for them. The local merchants association is a sponsor of the event and we look forward to bringing a large economic impact to the area.

3) Coastal Race Productions partner with several local Holden Beach area non-profits to raise money for their organizations in fundraisers, donations and utilizing over 100 local volunteers to put on this event.

Previously reported – July 2017
Run HB Requests – Coastal Race Productions
  a)
Banner Approval
  b)
Beer Garden Request

Agenda Packet –
Coastal Race Productions will be conducting Run HB on Saturday, September 9, 2017. The Town of Holden Beach will be a sponsor for the event.  Coastal Race Productions is here this evening to speak to you about both the possibility of a beer garden and to get permission to hang their signs and banners for the event.

Sales and Consumption of alcoholic beverages in the Town of Holden Beach is covered in the Code of Ordinances,130.03. It states Board of Commissioner approval is required as an exception to the sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages being prohibited. Coastal Race Productions brought it to the Town’s attention that they are allowed to have a beer garden in neighboring municipal venues where races like this are held.  They would like to offer that to the runners of legal age here as well. The access to the area would be controlled by Coastal Race Productions. They have additional information regarding how the system has worked at other beach communities and why they think it would add to the event.

Coastal Race Productions had a scheduling conflict, so Shoreline Protection & Recreation Programs Manager Christy Ferguson made the presentation. Discussion was over allowing the beer garden. The other three communities that sponsor the race – Oak Island, Sunset Beach and Ocean Isle Beach already gave their blessings.

Banner Request / A decision was made – Approved unanimously
Beer Garden Request / No decision was made – No action taken

Are you kidding me? The Board really made a big to do over nothing when they discussed the beer garden request. All we are talking about is each runner that is over 21 years old gets a free beer at the end of the race. Singular, UNO, ONE stinking beer.  They went with the combo platter of we are a family friendly beach and it would set a precedent rap. Apparently, some of them must not go on the beach strand where beer is consumed all day long on our family friendly beach.

Update –
This is the fifth annual fun family race day on Holden Beach. They had @1,300 participants last year and expect over @1,500 participants this year. All the other towns that the race is held allow both activities. They expect to have only five (5) to ten (10) vendors in a contained area. They don’t sell beer, they give one (1) free beer to runners over twenty-one (21) years old at the end of the race. In addition, donations are made to a local non-profit which in our case is to the Turtle Patrol. We are the only beach that has not given them permission.

Police Chief – no problem with it

Town Manager – need to establish protocols anticipating similar requests in the future

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

 
Now that wasn’t so hard, was it?



Run Holden Beach – 2018
The fifth annual “Run Holden Beach” event is scheduled on Saturday, September 15th.  Coastal Race Productions is planning a 1 mile “turtle trot”, 5k walk / run and a half marathon with all of these races starting and finishing under the bridge. This will all be followed by live music, games and an after party at the Holden Beach Pavilion.


5. Discussion and Possible Action – Construction Management Services of the Vacuum Sewer System #4 Upgrade Status Report – Public Works Director Clemmons

Previously reported – December 2017
McGill and Associates were commissioned to perform a Sewer Study to evaluate sewer system vulnerability reducing measures. A fiscal year 2017-2018 budget appropriation of $1,413,000 was made to accommodate total programmatic expenses of Lift Station #4 improvements. Green Engineering firm was awarded the $158,000 contract for Sewer System #4 upgrade. Green Engineering will provide all engineering services required to construct a vulnerability reducing structure of Lift Station #4.

Previously reported – April 2018
Four (4) meetings have been held between staff and the engineering firm to date. The final plans were delivered to the Town and have been reviewed and approved by the Building Inspector. Deliverables – Timeline has been revised. Buildings were designed in the same style as Town Hall. We are currently on schedule, but Chris cautioned that it was still early in the game. The Board requested monthly updates, reporting on whether we remained on schedule and within budget.

Previously reported – May 2018
We’ve had a slight setback, we did not receive the three (3) bids required to move forward. Officially we accepted no bids, the two bids submitted will be held and opened upon the completion of the second go round. Chris was a little surprised and disappointed since their appeared to be a lot of interest when they held meeting with vendors. We will need to start the bid process over. The protocols on the second bid process do not require the three bids but the caveat is we can only consider quality bids.

Previously reported – June 2018
BOC’s SPECIAL MEETING / May 23, 2018
Approved award of the Lift Station #4 upgrade contract to T.A. Loving Company in the amount of $1,205,000

Total project cost went from $1,413,000 to $1,695,700 or a $282,700 difference
Contingency funds were reduced from $157,400 to $52,480 or a $104,920 difference
Bottomline, the project cost just went up $387,620 ($282,700 + $104,920) or @27% (Yikes!)

A pre-construction meeting is scheduled for June 28th
We should have a tentative construction start date then

Update –
A pre-construction meeting was held on June 28th
The contractor was given notice to proceed
Mobilization is scheduled for the first week of August

Concerns:
.     1) Time to get materials – delay waiting for foundation steel
.     2)
Storm Season

My Two Cents - CR II
This really could be handled with a memo from Chris to the Board.


6. Police Report – Chief Wally Layne

Police Patch
First two weeks in July are the busiest weeks of the year
Fairly uneventful, typical summertime fun at the beach
We’ve been fortunate, since we really have not had any serious issues

.

We are just beginning the Hurricane Season – make sure your plans are in order
If the Town declares a mandatory evacuation, PLEASE LEAVE


Survived another Fourth of July
Same two issues – parking and fireworks

Parking –
BOC’s established parking policy and communicated their concerns about enforcement.
Police department responded accordingly. In June they issued eleven (11) parking tickets. The first nine (9) days of July they issued one hundred and twenty-one (121). (Careful what you wish for!)


Fireworks – everything’s copacetic
1) Substantially less than in previous years
2) No one was hurt
3) No fires were started
4) Confiscated fireworks
.


Public Safety Announcement
Chief Layne would like to remind everyone that it is important to protect your personal property. Annual event – transition from home break- ins to vehicle break- ins. Most crimes are crimes of opportunity. He used the term break-ins loosely since most of the vehicles were left unlocked. He preaches the same sermon to us each year to protect your personal property. Don’t be a volunteer victim! Remove all items of value from your vehicle when you are not driving it. Always lock your vehicle doors when you are not in it. Leaving items on display, whether on the dashboard or sitting on a passenger seat, is an invitation to opportunist individuals. Make sure to follow these important tips!


Crime Prevention 101 – Don’t make it easy for them
Don’t leave vehicles unlocked
Don’t leave valuables in your vehicles


A reminder of the Town’s beach strand ordinances:
…..1)
Chapter 90 / Animals / § 90.20 / Responsibilities of owners
…….a)
pets are not allowed on the beach strand except between 5p.m. and 9a.m. daily
…….b)
dog’s must be on a leash at all times
…….c)
owner’s need to clean up after their animals
…..2)
Chapter 94 / Beach regulations / § 94.05 / Digging of holes on beach strand
…….a)
digging holes greater than 12 inches deep without responsible person there
…….b)
holes shall be filled in prior to leaving
…..3)
Chapter 94 / Beach regulations / § 94.06 / Placing obstructions on the beach strand
…….a)
all unattended beach equipment must be removed daily by 6:00pm


Pets on the beach strand
Pets – Chapter 90 / Animals / § 90.20
From May 20th through September 10th
It is unlawful to have any pet on the beach strand
. • During the hours of 9:00am through 5:00pm

Unattended Gear
Ordinance 94.06 was passed on September 14, 2010. Beginning April 23, 2011, all unattended beach equipment must be removed from the beach by its owner or permitted user daily. All unattended personal equipment remaining on the beach between the hours of 6PM and 7AM will be classified as abandoned property and will be disposed of by the Town. 

Good news –
The Police Department will be removing any gear left on the beach strand between 10PM and 2AM daily. Guests are getting the message loud and clear; if they leave gear on the beach strand it will be removed.


Bad news
Since we are actively enforcing the ordinance we have what you’d call unintended consequences. Some beach equipment is being hidden in the dunes which frankly is worse than leaving it on the beach strand.


Educational Sign
The Town has put flashing educational signs at the bottom of the bridge on the island side. The sign messages were a huge help last year minimizing the need for Beach Strand Ordinance Enforcement. It has been the most effective communication medium used to date. Intent is to educate people before they get on the beach strand.

Defensive Driving
Be mindful on the road, tourists are out there and frankly many of them are not paying attention. Defensive driving is driving characterized by prudence, diligence and reasonable cautiousness. Its aim is to reduce the risk of collision by anticipating dangerous situations, despite adverse conditions or the actions of others.

Golf Carts
Golf carts are treated the same as other automotive vehicles
Town ordinances state no parking anytime on OBW
Therefore golf carts are illegally parked when left by any beach access points


Golf Cart Reminders

In the State of North Carolina, if a golf cart is to be operated on the streets, highways or public vehicular areas, it is considered a motor vehicle and subject to all laws, rules and regulations that govern motor vehicles.

In short, the golf cart must have all of the following:
. • The driver MUST have a current, valid Driver’s License
. • Child Restraint Laws must be followed
. • Headlights
. • Tail lights
. • Turn signals
. • Rear view mirrors
. • State Inspection Sticker
. • License Plate Issued by NCDMV
. • Liability Insurance

All of the streets in the Town (including the side streets) are considered streets or public vehicular areas according to the State Law. This means that to operate a golf cart anywhere on the island, you must meet the standards above. Also, golf carts may not be operated on streets with posted speed limit greater than 35 mph.

Neighborhood Watch

  • Need to look out for each other and report any suspicious activity
  • Call 911 if you see or hear anything suspicious
  • Fill out Keep Check Request Form if you will be out of town
  • Submit completed Property Registration Form
  • Pickup copy of Protecting Your Home

7. Discussion and Consideration on Petition for Four Way Stop for Carolina Avenue – Chief Layne
Agenda Packet –
Homeowners Letter
Thank you for taking time out of your busy schedule to return my call and giving advice on the direction that needs to be taken on the issue that is being addressed in this letter. Homeowners are requesting that stop signs are installed on Carolina Avenue at the intersection of Halstead Avenue and Carolina Avenue. We have a real problem with individuals speeding down Carolina Avenue and running the stop signs on Halstead Avenue. This has created an opportunity for an accident and we feel that it is just a matter of time before someone is seriously hurt.

We are requesting that this item be put on the agenda for the Holden Beach Board Meeting in June with the understanding that an ordinance change would be deemed necessary to have the installation of additional stop signs.

Chief Layne
A group of homeowners submitted a petition requesting that stop signs be installed on Carolina Avenue at the intersection of Halstead Street and Carolina Avenue. They are concerned with individuals speeding down Carolina Avenue and running the stop signs on Halstead Street.

If the Board desires to move forward with this request, you would need to approve an ordinance amendment for Chapter 71, Traffic Schedules of the Code of Ordinances. The amendment would need to add a section to create a four-way stop at the intersection of Carolina Avenue and Halstead Street. If the Board decides to move forward with this request, an ordinance will be prepared for your consideration at the August meeting.

Previously reported – July 2013
Discussion and Possible Action on Request for a Four Way Stop at the Intersection of Halstead Street and Brunswick Avenue
No accidents ever at this intersection
Could we put stop sign there – Absolutely
Would it be beneficial – Don’t think so
Probably do more harm than good
We do not have a four way stop at an intersection anywhere on the island

No decision was madeNo action taken

 Update –
“It’s like Déjà vu, all over again” – Yogi Berra
In order to be consistent, they would need to amend the Traffic Code Ordinance
No accidents ever at this intersection
Could we put stop sign there – Yes
Would it be beneficial – Probably not
We do not have a four way stop at an intersection anywhere on the island

No decision was made – No action taken

The Board said they would like to look at all their options before proceeding.

My Two Cents - CR III suppose they didn’t want to open a can of worms. I get why they want a four-way stop there. Of course, if granted this would set a precedent. Is the Board planning on making the same accommodation for all the other street intersections too?


8. Discussion and Possible Adoption of Resolution 18-07, Resolution Adopting Rules of Procedure for the Board of Commissioners– Commissioner Kwiatkowski
Agenda Packet –

RESOLUTION 18-07
RESOLUTION ADOPTING RULES OF PROCEDURE FOR THE BOC’s

WHEREAS, §30.19 of the Town’s Code of Ordinances states that “the Board shall adopt Rules of Procedure not inconsistent with North Carolina General Statutes at their regular scheduled meeting each December, or at other times deemed appropriate and publish same in the office of the Town Clerk;”

WHEREAS, the current Rules of Procedures were adopted on December 8, 2015 and the Board has determined they need to be updated.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that pursuant to §30.19 of the Town’s Code of Ordinances the attached Suggested Rules of Procedure for the Town of Holden Beach Board are hereby adopted and shall be published in the office of the Town Clerk.

Previously reported – December 2017
The Board of Commissioners are required to adopt Rules of Procedure per the Town’s Code of Ordinances Section §30.19.

§30.19 RULES OF PROCEDURE.
The BOC shall adopt such rules of procedure not inconsistent with North Carolina General Statutes at their regular scheduled meeting each December, or at other such times deemed appropriate, and publish same in the office of the Town Clerk.

This Board chose to continue under the current rules adopted by the previous Board. They plan to revisit this issue after the three (3) new members of the Board complete their training course

Previously reported – April 2018
Commissioner Kwiatkowski attempted to incorporate the suggested Rules of Procedure for a City Council that was recently released by the School of Government with the version the 2015- 2017 Board adopted. It did not go well. Commissioner Kwiatkowski and Commissioner Freer have agreed to work together and try to resolve. Mayor Pro Tem Sullivan recommended rather than meld the two they should use the School of Government template and modify that document making only minor adjustments.

Previously reported – June 2018
Commissioner Patricia Kwiatkowski made the presentation. Pat wanted both the Board and the public to have an opportunity to look at it before it was adopted. They are scheduled to vote on it at the next Regular Meeting.

No decision was made – No action taken

Update –
Adopted as submitted

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


9. Discussion and Possible Action on Agreement between the Town and the Cape Fear Council of Governments for CAMA Land Use Plan Update –
Planning Director Evans

Agenda Packet –
Director Evans
As one of the Towns future goals the Board of Commissioner’s showed significant interest in updating the Land use plan, as part of a two-year process, monies were allocated so that acquisition of a consultant for the 2018/2019 fiscal year would be possible.

This contract includes, Timeline, Scope and Introduction with past experience documents. The total cost of contract is $30,000, to be spread across fiscal years with $20,000 allocated from this years approved budget. The remainder will be included in 2019/2020 budget year for allocation.


The Cape Fear Council of Governments (CFCOG) is pleased to submit this proposal and agreement to develop a Comprehensive Land Use Plan (LUP) for the Town of Holden Beach. Assisting our member governments is a primary tenet of our mission and vision, and we hope that we can continue our years of involvement by performing the work outlined in the Proposal for you.

In the past few years, the CFCOG has developed or updated Land Use Plans for Ocean Isle Beach, Boiling Spring Lakes, Shallotte, Sunset Beach, Southport, and Topsail Beach. Our reputation for professionalism, competence, and technical skill has been earned by delivering valuable products that meet or exceed customer expectations. Our staff values that reputation and we look forward to the opportunity to validate it during the process of developing your Land Use Plan.

This project will be led by our Senior Regional Planner, Wes Macleod, who will be the primary contact for the Town. I will provide oversight and technical support. As CFCOG’s Executive Director, Chris May will be available to the Town to oversee staff and to guide the entire process. The CFCOG will work with Holden Beach to settle on a completion date and will not exceed our proposed budget of $30,000 to be expended over the course of two fiscal years.

In addition to this, the CFCOG would like to remind Town staff that if they have any other needs, including short-term problems that need to be addressed prior to completion of the Land Use Plan, our staff Is available to help.

For more information » click here

Timbo used an amusing boat analogy to say it might be time for an upgrade
No requirement for us to do it now but he strongly recommended that we should
He has had previous experience with this vendor

Highlighted their strengths as follows:
.     1)
They have adequate staff
.     2)
Their staff is experienced
.     3)
They can meet our timeline requirements
.     4)
They can meet our budget requirements

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


10. Discussion and Possible Action on Engagement Letter between the Town and RSM US LLP for Completion of Internal Control Review – Town Manager Hewett
a. Ordinance 18-12, An Ordinance Amending Ordinance 18-10, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance for Fiscal Year 2018 – 2019 (Amendment No. 1)
Agenda Packet –

Services and Scope of Work
In developing a risk matrix for the Town, we will consider internal control relevant to the Town’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design assurance procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances. Our risk assessment procedures are designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the controls that are in place and to evaluate potential gaps in internal control that could lead to fraud or error in the above noted transaction cycles. Gaining an understanding of your internal control will assist us in identifying types of potential deficiencies in internal control and factors that affect the risks of material misstatement as assessed by your external auditors. We also will draw on this understanding to provide feedback in internal control risk matrix about opportunities you may have to strengthen controls or streamline processes.

Previously reported – June 2018  
Direct Solicitation to Conduct Comprehensive Financial and Accounting Internal Control Review
Agenda Packet –
The Audit Report with respect to the Town’s Annual Financial Statements for the year ended June 30, 2017 raised two “significant deficiencies” with respect to the Town’s financial controls and procedures for financial statement preparation. The Audit Report also concluded that any financial reports provided to the Commissioners cannot be relied on, as the ledger does not reflect adjustments made in previous years. The Audit Committee has had preliminary discussions with the Auditor about these matters and the audit process, and as part of that discussion the Auditor recommended that the Town engage a consultant to perform a comprehensive review of its internal financial controls. The Audit report approved and signed by the Town’s Finance Director included a corrective response stating, “The Town of Holden Beach’s governing body feels that there are limited financial resources at this time for training the finance department staff in GAAP and that it is not cost beneficial to obtain additional assistance in this area.” This statement was false. Accordingly, I move that:

The Audit Committee is authorized and directed to review, investigate, report and make recommendations to the BOC on

(i) the Town’s accounting and financial control systems including “significant deficiencies” related to internal controls;

(ii) appropriate training of financial and accounting staff;

(iii) policies and procedures relating to financial statement preparation, preventive and detective internal controls, and the audit process, including engaging such consultants to perform such internal controls review as the Audit Committee deems necessary or appropriate.

Finding: 17-1 / SIGNIFICANT DEFICIENCY
Inadequate Design of Internal Controls over the Preparation of the Financial Statements

Finding: 17-2 / SIGNIFICANT DEFICIENCY
Prior Period Adjustment ($479,789)

Handout – Statement of Work
“The Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach, via their Audit Committee, is soliciting proposals to perform a review of the Town’s internal controls.

The scope of this work will include a review and assessment of current practices in the operations of the finance department, including the preparation of financial statements that are compliant with generally accepted accounting principles, and the development of financial reports provided to the Board of Commissioners.  In addition, the work should include a focus on the controls designed to prevent or detect misappropriations, embezzlement, and any other potential fraudulent activities.

The deliverables from the work should include an assessment of the effectiveness of existing controls as well as their implementation, recommended changes to work practices, policies and procedures to ensure accurate financial reporting, and to prevent certain events from occurring, as well as backup procedures to ensure the proposed internal controls function as intended.

The work should comply with the Local Government Budget and Fiscal Control Act and align with the principles in the COSO Internal Control Integrated Framework. ”

Discussion and Possible Action on the Audit Committee Recommendation of the Firm to Conduct an Internal Control Evaluation
The Audit Committee selected the firm RSM from Morehead City for the internal control Review. Recommendation is to obtain firm with a not to exceed price of $20,000. Scope of work subject to approval from The North Carolina Local Government Commission
A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Update –
Moved funds of $20,000 from Revenue account #10.0399.0200 to Expense account #10.0410.0400
Subject to approval from the Local Government Commission
With the understanding the Audit Chair will report back to the Board

A decision was made – Approved unanimosly


11. Discussion and Possible Approval of Audit Contract for Fiscal Year 2017 – 2018 between the Town and Rives and Associates, LLP – Town Manager Hewett
Agenda Packet –

Audit Objectives
The objective of our audit is the expression of opinions as to whether your financial statements are fairly presented, in all material respects, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles and to report on the fairness of the supplementary information referred to in the second paragraph when considered in relation to the financial statements as a whole. Our audit \\ill be conducted in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America and the standards for financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards, issued by the Comptroller General of the United States, and wilt include tests of the accounting records of Town of Holden Beach and other procedures we consider necessary to enable us to express such opinions. We will issue a written report upon completion of our audit of Town of Holden Beach’s financial statements. Our report will be addressed to Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach. We cannot provide assurance that unmodified opinions will be expressed. Circumstances may arise in which it is necessary for us to modify our opinions or add emphasis-of­ matter or other- matter paragraphs. If our opinions are other than unmodified, we will discuss the reasons with you in advance. If, for any reason, we are unable to complete the audit or are unable to form or have not fanned opinions, we may decline to express opinions or issue reports, or may withdraw from this engagement.

We will also provide a report (that does not include an opinion) on internal control related to the financial statements and compliance with the provisions of laws, regulations. contracts, and grant agreements, noncompliance with which could have a material effect on the financial statements as required by Government Auditing Standards. The report on internal control and on compliance and other matters will include a paragraph that states (I) that the purpose of the report is solely to describe the scope of testing of internal control and compliance. and the results of that testing, and not to provide an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control on compliance, and (2) that the report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance with Government Auditing Standards in considering the entity’s internal control and compliance. The paragraph will also state that the report is not suitable for any other purpose If during our audit we become aware that the Town of Holden Beach is subject to an audit requirement that is not encompassed in  the terms of  this engagement, we  will communicate to management  and those charged with governance that an audit in accordance with U.S. generally accepted auditing standards and the standards for financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards may not satisfy the relevant legal, regulatory, or contractual requirements.

Previously reported – April 2017
Direct Solicitation for External Audit
The North Carolina Local Government Commission requires the Town to have an annual audit performed. The Town has used Thompson, Price, Scott, Adams and Co. since 2012 to perform this service. Approval of the contract means that Thompson, Price, Scott, Adams & Co has been selected for their sixth consecutive year, with no cost increase, to handle our audit for fiscal year that ends June 30th, 2017. Protocol is to change firms every few years, traditionally we have done that after vendor has audited us for three years. Annual audit vendor usually selected, and contract signed in February.
A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Previously reported – June 2018      
Discussion and Possible Action on the Audit Committee Recommendation of the Firm to Conduct the 2017 – 2018 Annual Audit
The Audit Committee selected the firm Rives & Associates as the auditor
A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Update –
Standard contract with money in the budget to execute it
Subject to approval from the Local Government Commission

Approval of the contract means that Rivers & Associates has been selected to handle our audit for fiscal year that ends June 30th, 2018. The audit contract is for $12,784 and an additional charge of $2,000 for writing the financial statements; making the total cost of the contract $14,784 for an increase of $2,034. The last six years we awarded the $12,750 contract to Thompson, Price, Scott, Adams and Co.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


12. Discussion and Possible Scheduling of a Date to Hold a Public Hearing Regarding FIRM Map Adoption and Amendments to Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance– Town Clerk Finnell
Agenda Packet –
Per the direction of Attorney Fox at our June meeting, the Board needs to schedule another date to hold a public hearing regarding FIRM map adoption and amendments to the flood damage prevention ordinance.

In order to ensure we meet the required timeline to adopt these items, staff recommends scheduling a Special Meeting on August 6, 2018 at I :00 p.m. to hold a public hearing and to consider adoption of the necessary documents.

A very specific process must be followed
Last month implementation was delayed due to a procedural issue
This month it was delayed in order to meet the timeline requirements
The Board scheduled a Public Hearing and to Adopt the Ordinance for August 6th


13. Discussion and Possible Scheduling of Dates – Commissioner Pat Kwiatkowski
  a)
Special Meeting to Discuss Waste and Recycle Issues
  b)
Special Meeting for a Work Session for the Board and Town Manager to Draft at Least a Three and Possibly Five-Year Revenue vs. Cost Estimate to Help Planning for Growing Fund and Reserve Balances

Waste and Recycle meeting is scheduled for August 6th too

Revenue & Expenses meeting is tentatively scheduled for the week of September 10th


14. Charge to the Inlet and Beach Protection Board – Commissioner Kwiatkowski
Agenda Packet –
Ordinance 18-02, An Ordinance Establishing the Inlet and Beach Protection Board

§35.02 POWERS AND DUTIES.

The Inlet and Beach Protection Board shall:

(A) Serve as an advisory board for the town;

(B) Prepare and recommend to the Board of Commissioners, a comprehensive long-term plan for the Town’s role, if any, in the management, dredging and protection of the Lockwood Folly and Shallotte Inlets, including their respective navigational channels, and the management, protection and nourishment of the town’s ocean beaches and protective dune systems

(C) Evaluate the feasibility and cost and benefits of proposed dredging projects (excluding canal dredging), beach and/or dune nourishment projects and protective structure projects to the town and to property owners within the town as a whole, and make recommendations to the Board of Commissioners with respect to such projects;

(D)  With the assistance of the Attorney assigned to support the Inlet and Beach Protection

Board make recommendations   to the Board of Commissioners for amendments   or modifications to the town’s ordinances with respect to the “frontal dune” and “protective dune system”;

(E)  With the assistance of the Attorney assigned to support the Inlet and Beach Protection Board, make recommendations to the Board of Commissioners for modifications to the town’s ordinances with respect to public and private beach access walkways which promote protection and growth of the town’s protective dune systems;

 (F) Serve as a link between the Board of Commissioners, Town Manager and the community on the above described areas;

(G) Perform such other duties within or related to the general purview of the Inlet and Beach Protection Board which may assigned to it from time-to-time by the Board of Commissioners.

Update –
Pat requested a kickoff meeting with the newly created Board. They are attempting to schedule a joint meeting with the BOC’s before the end of the month. The Commissioners all indicated that they want to get this Board on track and to begin functioning as soon as possible.


15. Discussion and Possible Approval of Resolution 18-08, Resolution Amending Fund Balance Policy – Town Manager Hewett 

RESOLUTION 18-08
Amending Fund Balance Policy

WHEREAS, the Interlocal agreement with Brunswick County currently has $1,461,600 of Holden Beach funds for surety on the PNC Special Obligation Bond; and

WHEREAS, the bond payment decreases incrementally annually; and

WHEREAS, the Interlocal agreement requires that at the end of each fiscal year, the County refund the Town any amount in the County Reserve Fund in excess of the remaining maximum annual debt service on the Special Obligation Bonds; and

WHEREAS, the Holden Beach Board of Commissioners has established a Beach Re-nourishment and Inlet Management Fund for the purpose of alleviating financial burden for future sand projects; and

WHEREAS, the Holden Beach Board of Commissioners has established a goal of accumulating I 0 million dollars over the course of nine years.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, the Holden Beach Fund Balance Policy is hereby amended by adding paragraph (c) as reads, ”annually, beginning with the adoption and implementation of the I July 2019 budget, the refunded PNC surety monies remitted to the Town of Holden Beach from Brunswick County shall be escrowed in the Beach Re-nourishment and Inlet Management Fund.

Almost a no brainer. The funds are already “sand” money it’s simply a straight up transition. This establishes a program that automatically puts refund money into the Beach Inlet Management Fund.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


16. Discussion and Possible Nomination of Members to Fill Vacancies on Town Boards – Town Clerk Finnell
.   a)
Board of Adjustment
.   b)
Planning & Zoning Board
  c)
Parks & Recreation Advisory Board
Agenda Packet –
John Legge’s term is expiring on the Parks & Recreation Advisory Board. He is not interested in serving another term. Suzannah Taft is interested in serving on the Parks & Recreation Advisory Board and is scheduled for an interview with the Board on July 10th at 6:45 p.m.

There is one Alternate Member position expiring on the Board of Adjustment. The current member is eligible and interested in serving another term.

There are three Regular Member and two Alternate Member terms expiring on the Planning & Zoning Board. All of the current members are eligible and willing to serve another term.

By acclimation everything stays the same for both the Board of Adjustment and Planning & Zoning. On Parks & Recreation, Suzannah Taft will replace John Legge.

§ 155.11 MEMBERSHIP AND VACANCIES
No regular member shall serve for more than two consecutive terms,
and a member having served two consecutive terms shall not be eligible for reappointment until after remaining off the Board for one year.

I’m of the opinion that our Board term policy unnecessarily creates vacancies. Interestingly we have term limits for all our Boards except the Board of Commissioners. In what universe does that make sense?

Volunteers needed
The Town is always looking for people to volunteer for their various boards and committees. If you are interested, submit a resume form to heather@hbtownhall.com.


17. Discussion and Possible Action on Request from the Board of Adjustment – Town Clerk Finnell
Agenda Packet –
Board of Adjustment Letter
Over the past few years, the BOA has been receiving requests, for variances, as it relates to “Cargo Lifts”. The requests are coming from older houses that already violate the 25′ setback but are still allowed to build outside staircases and HVAC platforms. Today, Larry Blume made a motion to ask the BOC to consider changing the ordinance to add Cargo Lifts in ordinance 157.060 (D)(C3) and 157.060 (E) (2) (b).

This change will allow the building inspector to handle these requests, via, the permitting process, thus saving the home owner the expense of applying for a variance.

Heather
The Board of Adjustment is requesting an amendment to the Town’s Code of Ordinances. They would like the Board to consider amending Section 157.060, Residential Districts to allow the building inspector to handle requests relating to cargo lifts via the permitting process.

If the Board would like to move forward with the Board of Adjustment’s request, staff will work with the Town Attorney to draft an ordinance for the Board’s consideration at an upcoming meeting.

Update –
Planning Director Evans explained that the current process creates an undue burden for the homeowner of both time and money. So far, every request submitted has been approved. The first step to make the requested change is to send it to the Planning & Zoning Board.


18. Town Manager’s Report

Training
All members of Boards and Committees will be given open meeting law training

Annual Beach Monitoring
ATM is a coastal engineering firm that does annual monitoring, data collection and reporting. Annual monitoring has occurred since 2001. We have an engineered beach – which means it has been nourished and is being monitored. Currently they are compiling information and preparing a report. This report is a prima facie document.

Beach Ranger Program
We have started a second shift extending the hours that they are on the beach strand
Ordered and waiting for delivery of second gator

Parking
Previously reported – February 2018

Before 2018 Beach Season

  1. Develop a visitor map of all available approved parking locations throughout the island.
  2. Provide signage at the bottom of the bridge as to parking locations, to include signage at these locations.
  3. Better utilization of current parking through the use of parking space marking and dividers.
  4. Property owners have an option to prohibit parking in rights-of-way.
  5. Town ordinances impacted by the changes to be revised accordingly.
  6. Develop a communication plan regarding the parking revisions to improve the parking issues on the island.
  7. Police enforcement and monitoring required to support implementation of the changes to include visitor guidance.
  8. Change parking violations to civil offenses, allowing the Town to keep the fines.
  9. No overnight parking in public parking areas.

 Staff has implemented Phase I for the tourist season this year.

Sand Resources for Beach Nourishment
The County plans from the Lockwood Folly Inlet dredging project, near shore placement of 6,000 cubic yards of sand on the Oak Island side.  Apparently, the Lockwood Folly Inlet Crossing dredging sand is in play now too. We have been the recipient of the dredging sand from there for the better part of the last thirty (30) years.

Canal Dredging
Previously reported – December 2017
Adoption Resolution 17-10, Water Resources Development Grant ($1,439,922)

The grant is good for two years and will accelerate our current dredging schedule. Each canal will be responsible for paying for their dredging project costs upfront. It is a reimbursement grant which means we do not receive the funds from the state until after satisfactory completion of the project.

Previously reported – June 2018
The Town is planning to perform a complete dredge of all of the canals this coming fall/winter (November 2018 – Mar 2019). We have been apprised of recent changes regarding the obtainment of consent agreements for USACE dredge spoil areas.   Those changes will result in closer scrutiny of remaining capacity in existing sites; hence longer/unknown lead times and quite possibly denial of permission to place material from this fall’s canal maintenance dredging in the Corps disposal sites. The Town has been preparing the area adjacent to the dog park as an alternate site if unable to use the USACE dredge spoil areas. David reminded us that this is a big undertaking with lots of moving parts and will require considerable time and effort from the Town staff to pull it off without a hitch.

Update –
The Town has been preparing the area adjacent to the dog park off Scotch Bonnet.
It will be necessary to close the dog park this winter once dredging project begins.

Water Bill / Canal Dredging
The Town is planning to perform a complete dredge of all of the canals this coming fall/winter (November 2018 – Mar 2019). It is recommended that property owners begin getting ready for the canal dredging as early as possible by first assessing the condition of their bulkheads so that repairs on those structures can be made in plenty of time before dredging begins. This will not only provide for the best dredging effort, but also lesson the possibility of leaky bulkheads filling canals back in prematurely after dredge completion. The Town will also be conducting its annual inspection of the bulkheads. Likewise, it is also recommended that property owners begin to coordinate the actions needed to move your floating docks in anticipation of the actual dredge arrival in order to facilitate a better excavation near their pilings. Finally, boat movements should also be considered. You may want to begin planning for winter accommodations and repairs to your boat now. Remember that boat dry docks book up fast.


19. Mayor’s Comments

July 4th
Full house, rental companies were all booked solid
Alan observed that it was relatively calm for the number of people that were here
I concur, it was not the usual Fourth of July zoo

Bridgeview Park
Ribbon cutting ceremony and dedication was today. Alan thanked everyone that was involved in making both the park and the event happen. He said that the park is something that we all can be proud of

Hurricane Season
Protocols are in place
Alan plans to continue to effectively communicate information to the community


20. Public Comments on General Items

Two building contractors spoke about the significant increase in permitting fees

RESOLUTION 18-04 / ADOPTING SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT FEES REPORT
RESOLUTION 18-05 / AMENDING THE HOLDEN BEACH FEE SCHEDULE

Fee is based on combination of existing system capacity and planned capital improvements to expand capacity  

An unintended consequence of System Development Fee adopted in June
.     •
Seven (7) bedroom permit was $10,000 now costs $30,000 a difference of $20,000
.    
Five (5) bedroom permit was $7,000 now costs $21,000 a difference of $14,000

Jaw Drop

That’s a whapping 300% increase which will negatively impact new construction on the island. By comparison, Ocean Isle Beach had a minor increase since their system is older and already paid for. I’d expect to see both the General Contractors and the Realtors up in arms. Unchanged we will have significantly reduced the future revenue stream from new construction from both ad Valorem and Occupancy taxes.   Really don’t see how the Board doesn’t have to reevaluate the fee schedule.

House Bill 436 / Public Water and Sewer System Development Fee Act
The North Carolina General Assembly passed House Bill 436 in July 2017, amending Chapter 162A of the General Statutes by adding “Article 8, System Development Fees.” This amendment was enacted as “An Act to Provide for Uniform Authority to Implement System Development Fees for Public Water and Sewer Systems in North Carolina and to Clarify the Applicable Statute of Limitations.” in HB436, which requires compliance with designated calculation methodology by July 1, 2018.

In response to the House Bill 436, the Town of Holden Beach retained McGill and Associates to complete a system development fee analysis. Based on the Town of Holden Beach’s combination of existing system capacity and planned capital improvements to expand capacity, the development fee, in accordance with HB 436 rules for an Equivalent Residential Unit (ERU) for water and sewer was calculated to be $20,577. ERU is defined as the water and sewer capacities required to serve the most typical user type, which is a three-bedroom single-family dwelling.

McGill and Associates prepared the System Development Fees Report for the Town. The report was posted to our website on March 26th and written comments were solicited. The report must be posted for at least 45 days. The Board scheduled and held a Public Hearing on May 23rd.

McGill Associates has calculated costs for water and wastewater capacity on a per gallon per day basis for the Town of Holden Beach. This calculation was performed using the Combined Method to account for the Town’s combination of existing capacity and planned future capacity expansion through capital expenditure. This calculation resulted in a development fee of $20,577 for an Equivalent Residential Unit (ERU). ERU is defined as the water and sewer capacities required to serve the most typical user type, which is a three-bedroom single-family dwelling. The fee for other types of development can be calculated by applying the calculated the cost of capacity per gallon of flow per day to the water and wastewater demands for various uses as defined by NC Administrative Code 15A NCAC 18C .0409 and 15A NCAC 02T.0114.

Using NC Administrative Code 15A NCAC 18C .0409 and 15A NCAC 02T.0114 ensures that the same standard used to plan, design, construct and finance capital assets is applied as the same cost recovery basis to be applied to new development.

The Town may elect to charge less than the cost-justified System Development Fee documented in this report. Any adjustment must be calculated on a cost per unit volume basis, meaning the same cost per gallon adjustment must be applied equally to all customers.

Legislation House Bill 436 required a Public Hearing as one of the steps that must happen before the Town can move forward and implement the charges. HB436 is prescriptive, with precise instructions and the report given is in accordance with the legislation. The next steps are adoption of the study report and creating Ordinance that incorporates the recommended fees into a fee schedule. This process must be completed no later than July 1st. We are required to review the fee schedule and must reevaluate it in a maximum five-year timeframe.

Town Meeting 06/19/18
RESOLUTION 18-04
/ ADOPTING SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT FEES REPORT
RESOLUTION 18-05 / AMENDING THE HOLDEN BEACH FEE SCHEDULE


22. Executive Session Pursuant to North Carolina General Statute 143-318.11(a)(3) to Consider the Performance of an Employee


General Comments –

Mayor Pro Tem Mike Sullivan – was not in attendance

There were forty-two (42) members of the community in attendance
But only fifteen (15) members of the community were still there at the end of the meeting

The BOC’s August Regular Meeting is scheduled on the third Tuesday of the month, August 21st

Town Manager’s Review
The Town Managers performance review was supposed to be done on the anniversary date of his hire which is in February. Once again it was not done in a timely manner. 

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Hurricane Season –

Hurricane #1 - CR

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) defines a hurricane as “an intense tropical weather system with a well-defined circulation and maximum sustained winds of 74 mph (64 knots) or higher.”

Be prepared – have a plan!

For assistance with making an emergency plan read more here »
. 1) FEMA Ready
. 2) American Red Cross Disaster and Safety Library
. 3) ReadyNC
. 4) Town Emergency Information
. 5) HBPOIN Hurricane Emergency Plan

THB – EVACUATION, CURFEW & VEHICLE DECALS
For more information » click here

If the Town declares a mandatory evacuation, PLEASE LEAVE
General Assembly during the 2012 Session, specifically authorizes both voluntary and mandatory evacuations, and increases the penalty for violating any local emergency restriction or prohibition from a Class 3 to a Class 2 misdemeanor. Given the broad authority granted to the governor and city and county officials under the North Carolina Emergency Management Act (G.S. Chapter 166A) to take measures necessary to protect public health, safety, and welfare during a disaster, it is reasonable to interpret the authority to “direct and compel” evacuations to mean ordering “mandatory” evacuations. Those who choose to not comply with official warnings to get out of harm’s way, or are unable to, should prepare themselves to be fully self-sufficient for the first 72 hours after the storm.

A repeat of 2017′: Experts predict another destructive hurricane season
A scientist with Global Weather Oscillations is predicting the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season to be “somewhat of a repeat of 2017,” claiming this year will bring more devastating storms. According to GWO, a storm prediction company, this year’s Atlantic hurricane season may be just as destructive — or even more destructive — than the 2017 season, which ended with 17 named storms and 6 major hurricanes. In 2017, GWO predicted 16 named storms, eight hurricanes and four major hurricanes. Professor David Dilley, senior research and prediction scientist for GWO, predicts that 2018 will be “somewhat of a repeat of 2017,” but some hurricane landfalls will occur in different locations this year. Dilley anticipates 16 named storms, eight hurricanes and four major hurricanes. He also predicts four of the hurricanes have potential for U.S. landfall — with two likely being “major impact storms.” “Some United States zones and the Caribbean Islands are currently in their strongest hurricane landfall cycle in 40 to 70-years,” Dilley said in a statement. Dilley says the reason for another disastrous hurricane season has to do with ocean water temperatures. He explains how the temperatures continue to run warmer than normal across most of the Atlantic, especially in the Caribbean region and the Atlantic near the U.S. “This is very similar to the ocean temperatures of last year, and this will again be conducive for tropical storms and/or hurricanes forming and/or strengthening near the Lesser Antilles and close to the United States,” he added.
Read more » click here

Hurricane Season’s Around the Corner. Here’s What to Expect.
This year’s hurricane season should be normal or slightly more active than average, government forecasters said on Thursday. After the exceptionally destructive season last year, the prediction might seem like a reprieve of sorts. But a season with few storms can do tremendous damage if a single storm makes landfall. Hurricane season runs from June 1 until Nov. 1 and peaks from mid-August through late October. “We’re not expecting the season to be one of the most active on record,” said Gerry Bell, lead hurricane season forecaster with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Prediction Center. But, he said, “It’s time to start getting prepared.”
Read more » click here

NOAA predicts 10-16 named storms for the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season
This year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is predicting an average number of major storms

Last year’s Atlantic hurricane season saw plenty of named storms and several destructive ones. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) this year’s season is predicted to be near or above-normal with 10-16 named storms.

“NOAA’s forecasters predict a 70 percent likelihood of 10 to 16 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which 5 to 9 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including 1 to 4 major hurricanes (category 3, 4 or 5; with winds of 111 mph or higher). An average hurricane season produces 12 named storms, of which 6 become hurricanes, including 3 major hurricanes,” according to a NOAA press release.

The 2018 Atlantic hurricane season is driven by several factors, including El Niño and sea-surface temperatures.

“With the advances made in hardware and computing over the course of the last year, the ability of NOAA scientists to both predict the path of storms and warn Americans who may find themselves in harm’s way is unprecedented,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “The devastating hurricane season of 2017 demonstrated the necessity for prompt and accurate hurricane forecasts,” according to the release.
Read more » click here

Forecasters predict a near- or above-normal 2018 Atlantic hurricane season
NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center is forecasting a 75-percent chance that the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season will be near- or above-normal.

Forecasters predict a 35 percent chance of an above-normal season, a 40 percent chance of a near-normal season, and a 25 percent chance of a below-normal season for the upcoming hurricane season, which extends from June 1 to November 30.

“With the advances made in hardware and computing over the course of the last year, the ability of NOAA scientists to both predict the path of storms and warn Americans who may find themselves in harm’s way is unprecedented,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “The devastating hurricane season of 2017 demonstrated the necessity for prompt and accurate hurricane forecasts.”

NOAA’s forecasters predict a 70-percent likelihood of 10 to 16 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which 5 to 9 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including 1 to 4 major hurricanes (category 3, 4 or 5; with winds of 111 mph or higher). An average hurricane season produces 12 named storms, of which 6 become hurricanes, including 3 major hurricanes.

The possibility of a weak El Nino developing, along with near-average sea surface temperatures across the tropical Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, are two of the factors driving this outlook. These factors are set upon a backdrop of atmospheric and oceanic conditions that are conducive to hurricane development and have been producing stronger Atlantic hurricane seasons since 1995.

“NOAA’s observational and modeling enhancements for the 2018 season put us on the path to deliver the world’s best regional and global weather models,” said Neil Jacobs, Ph.D., assistant secretary of commerce for environmental observation and prediction. “These upgrades are key to improving hurricane track and intensity forecasts, allowing NOAA to deliver the best science and service to the nation.”

NOAA’s suite of sophisticated technologies – from next-generation models and satellite data to new and improved forecast and graphical products – enable decision makers and the general public to take action before, during, and after hurricanes, helping to build a more “Weather-Ready Nation.”

“Preparing ahead of a disaster is the responsibility of all levels of government, the private sector and the public,” said acting FEMA Deputy Administrator Daniel Kaniewski. “It only takes one storm to devastate a community so now is the time to prepare. Do you have adequate insurance, including flood insurance? Does your family have a communication and evacuation plan? Stay tuned to your local news and download the FEMA app to get alerts, and make sure you heed any warnings issued by local officials.”

NOAA will update the 2018 Atlantic seasonal outlook in early August, just prior to the peak of the season.
Read more » click here

NOAA promotes preparedness as 2018 hurricane season begins June 1
A named storm formed before the beginning of the hurricane season for a fourth consecutive year.

Subtropical Storm Alberto made landfall near Laguna Beach, according to the NWS National Hurricane Center in Miami. By Tuesday afternoon it was downgraded to a subtropical depression as it moved through central Alabama.

This year’s Atlantic hurricane season isn’t expected to be as active as last year’s, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. “We do not expect an extremely active (hurricane season) like last year,” Dr. Jerry Bell, NOAA’s lead seasonal hurricane forecaster, said during a May 24 news conference. “But an active season means a lot of storms could form in the Atlantic (Ocean).” An average season produces 12 named storms, with six becoming hurricanes, including three major hurricanes.

Regardless of the prediction, the Atlantic region needs to prepare for hurricane season. A hurricane can strike in any season, whether it is active like in 2017 or not,” he said. Bell said while they can make predictions of hurricane activity, they can’t predict where hurricanes will land — and they don’t just impact coastal communities. About 80 million people between the Atlantic coast and the Gulf of Mexico coastline face the threat of hurricanes, with inland flooding causing significant damage in recent years. “While we can’t prevent hurricanes, we can take action to better prevent their impact on communities,” Neil Jacobs, Ph.D., assistant secretary of commerce for environmental observation and prediction, said during the forecast presentation. Throughout the presentation, speakers emphasized residents in the Atlantic hurricane coverage area should prepare every year as if they will be impacted by a tropical storm or hurricane. “Prepare now, before hurricane season by making emergency and evacuation plans for your families” so family members know how to react even if they might not be together when a disaster strikes, Jacobs said. Jacobs added while technology allows the NOAA to project a narrower tracking cone for a hurricane’s projected path each year, the hazards caused by wind and water create dangerous circumstances outside the cone, too.
Read more » click here

2018 Atlantic Hurricane Season Now Expected to Be Less Active
The 2018 Atlantic hurricane season is increasingly expected to be less active than average, according to an updated seasonal outlook released by Colorado State University. 

Including May’s Subtropical Storm Alberto, 11 named storms, four hurricanes and only one major hurricane of Category 3 or higher intensity are expected this season in CSU’s latest outlook released Monday. 

This is a significant reduction from its May 31 outlook, which had called for 14 total named storms, six hurricanes and two major hurricanes, and nearly matches the outlook released in late June by The Weather Company, an IBM Business.
Read more » click here

No matter what a storm outlook is for a given year,

vigilance and preparedness is urged.


HBPOIN – Lou’s Views
        • Gather and disseminate information
.          • Identify the issues and determine how they affect you
.          • Act as a watchdog
.          • Grass roots monthly newsletter since 2008

https://lousviews.com/

07 – News & Views

Lou’s Views
News & Views / July Edition

Calendar of Events –

Run Holden Beach – 2018
The fifth annual “Run Holden Beach” event is scheduled on Saturday, September 15th.  Coastal Race Productions is planning a 1 mile “turtle trot”, 5k walk / run and a half marathon with all of these races starting and finishing under the bridge. This will all be followed by live music, games and an after party at the Holden Beach Pavilion.

For more information
» click here
Run signup » click here


 Events
TDA - logo
Discover a wide range of things to do in the Brunswick Islands for an experience that goes beyond the beach.

For more information »
click here


Calendar of Events – Island


Concerts on the Coast Series
Live performances featuring local musical groups are held at the pavilion on Sunday evenings from late May to early September. The concerts are free of charge. Popcorn sold at the concerts is used to support the concerts and fund beautification projects in the area.
.
For more information
»
click here


Shirt - CR

Tide Dyed Program
This event is located at the Holden Beach Pavilion. Tie dye your own shirts; the cost is just $5 per shirt. It takes place at 2:00 p.m. every Tuesday during the summer.


Turtle - Loggerheads CR

Turtle Talk
Two programs both are held every Wednesday during the summer at Town Hall. Children’s Turtle Time is at 4:00 p.m. with crafts, stories and activities for children ages 3 – 6. All children must be accompanied by an adult. Turtle Talk is an educational program at 7:00 p.m. for everyone else.


Camp Kids Playing

Summer Day Camp Program
Day Camp is on Thursday during the summer beginning June 14th and is open to children ages 6 – 12. Kids can join us this summer for a variety of fun activities. Click here to view our Camp Schedule with each week’s activity and cost. Space is limited, you must pre-register. Completed registration forms must be mailed in with payment or dropped off with payment to Town Hall. Payment is non-refundable.


Parks & Recreation / Programs & Events
For more information » click here


Reminders –



BOC’s Meeting
The Board of Commissioners’ August Regular Meeting is scheduled on the third Tuesday of the month, August 21st

 


Speed Limit
Please take notice – Speed limit seasonal limitations, in accordance with Town Ordinances.Speed limit will change on OBW from 45mph to 35mph west of the general store. This change took place on April 1st and be in effect through September 30th .



Trash Can Requirements –
Rental Properties


Waste Industries – trash can requirements / Ordinance 07-13, Section 50.10
Rental properties have specific number of trash cans based on number of bedrooms.
. a.
One extra trash can per every two bedrooms
§50.08 RENTAL HOMES.

(A) Rental homes, as defined in Chapter 157, that are rented as part of the summer rental season, are subject to high numbers of guests, resulting in abnormally large volumes of trash. This type of occupancy use presents a significantly higher impact than homes not used for summer rentals. In interest of public health and sanitation and environmental concerns, all rental home shall have a minimum of one trash can per two bedrooms. Homes with an odd number of bedrooms shall round up (for examples one to two bedrooms – one trash can; three to four bedrooms – two trash cans; five – six bedrooms – three trash cans, and the like).

Solid Waste Pick-Up Schedule
Waste Industries change in service, trash pickup will be twice a week
Starting the Saturday before Memorial Day through the Saturday after Labor Day:

Pick-up is every Tuesday and Saturday from May 26th through September 8th

Please note:

  • Trash carts must be at the street by 6:00 a.m. on the pickup day.
  • Carts on OCEAN BOULEVARD ONLY will be rolled back to the front of the house.
  • BAG the trash before putting it in the cart.

 


Golf Carts

 

 

Golf carts are treated the same as other automotive vehicles
Town ordinances state no parking anytime on OBW
Therefore golf carts are illegally parked when left by any beach access point


 

Pets on the Beach Strand

 

.
.

Pets – Chapter 90 / Animals / 90.20
From May 20th through September 9th
It is unlawful to have any pet on the beach strand
. a. D
uring the hours of 9:00am through 5:00pm

Here are the beaches where your dog is welcome, and not welcome
Different beach towns have different rules, but all require dogs to be leashed. While some beaches allow dogs on the beach all the time, others strictly forbid them. All beaches require pet owners to clean up any waste from pets.
Read more » click here


 

 

A Second Helping


.
.
.
Program to collect food Saturday mornings during the summer
. 1.
Fourteenth year of the program
. 2.
Food collections have now totaled over 213,000 pounds
. 3. C
ollections will begin on June 9th
. 4. Food is distributed to the needy in Brunswick County
For more information » click here

They have moved –
Drop-off site has moved to the Beach Mart parking lot on the Causeway.



Bird Nesting Area

NC Wildlife Commission has posted signs that say – Bird Nesting Area / Please don’t disturb. The signs are posted on the west end beach strand around 1339 OBW.


People and dogs are supposed to stay out of the area from April through November

. 1) It’s a Plover nesting area
. 2) Allows migrating birds a place to land and rest without being disturbed


Building Numbers
Ocean front homes are required to have house numbers visible from the beach strand.
Please call Planning and Inspections Department at 910.842.6080 with any questions.

§157.087 BUILDING NUMBERS.

(A) The correct street number shall be clearly visible from the street on all buildings. Numbers shall be block letters, not script, and of a color clearly in contrast with that of the building and shall be a minimum of six inches in height.
(B) Beach front buildings will also have clearly visible house numbers from the strand side meeting the above criteria on size, contrast, etc. Placement shall be on vertical column supporting deck(s) or deck roof on the primary structure. For buildings with a setback of over 300 feet from the first dune line, a vertical post shall be erected aside the walkway with house numbers affixed. In all cases the numbers must be clearly visible from the strand. Other placements may be acceptable with approval of the Building Inspector.


 

Mosquito Control

.


Current EPA protocol is that spraying is complaint driven

The Town is unable to just spray as they had in the past
. 1)
Complaint based
. 2)
Citizen request
. 3)
Proactively monitor hot spots

They recommend that you get rid of any standing water on your property that you can
Urged everyone to call Town Hall if they have mosquito issues so that they can spray

Spraying is complaint based, so keep the calls coming!


It is time to ‘fight the bite’
Now that it seems spring is finally here to stay; state health officials advise us to “Fight the Bite” by taking measures to reduce the risk of tick and mosquito bites. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the number of vector-borne diseases, or those transmitted though the bites of blood-feeding ticks, mosquitoes and fleas, has more than tripled across the country. While April is Tick and Mosquito Awareness Month in North Carolina, the danger of contracting a serious illness like Lyme disease, West Nile or Zika viruses, exists all year, especially in warmer climates like ours here in Brunswick County.

To reduce exposure to tick and mosquito bites:

  • Avoid tick habitats, such as wooded, grassy or brushy areas.
  • Use tick and mosquito repellent that contains DEET (or equivalent) on exposed skin and wear permethrin-treated clothing. Use caution when applying to children.
  • Reduce tick habitats with selective landscaping techniques, like putting a three-foot wide barrier of wood chips or gravel between lawns, wooded areas, patios and playground equipment
  • Install or repair screens on windows and doors and use air conditioning if possible.
  • “Tip and toss” to reduce mosquito breeding by emptying standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, discarded tires and birdbaths at least once a week.
    Read more » click here

Canal Dredging
The Town is planning to perform a complete dredge of all of the canals this coming fall/winter (November 2018 – Mar 2019). It is recommended that property owners begin getting ready for the canal dredging as early as possible by first assessing the condition of their bulkheads so that repairs on those structures can be made in plenty of time before dredging begins. This will not only provide for the best dredging effort, but also lesson the possibility of leaky bulkheads filling canals back in prematurely after dredge completion. The Town will also be conducting its annual inspection of the bulkheads. Likewise, it is also recommended that property owners begin to coordinate the actions needed to move your floating docks in anticipation of the actual dredge arrival in order to facilitate a better excavation near their pilings. Finally, boat movements should also be considered. You may want to begin planning for winter accommodations and repairs to your boat now. Remember that boat dry docks book up fast.


Volunteers needed
The Town is always looking for people to volunteer for their various boards and committees. If you are interested in serving, please fill out a resume form and submit it to heather@hbtownhall.com.


Recycling-Bin
Curbside recycling

Waste Industries is now offering curbside recycling for Town properties that desire to participate in the service. The service cost is $54.00 annually paid in advance to the Town of Holden Beach and consists of a ninety-six (96) gallon cart that is emptied every other week.
Curbside Recycling Application » click here
Curbside Recycling Calendar » click here


Elevator - CR

Elevators
Most states mandate that elevator systems be tested and inspected annually. Currently the state of North Carolina does not require annual inspections to be performed on all elevator systems. The use of unsafe and defective lifting devices imposes a substantial probability of serious and preventable injury to your family and guests. It is in the owner’s best interest to minimize injuries and liability by scheduling an annual safety inspection to ensure the safe operation of their elevator system.

Safety Notice –
Waupaca Elevator Company has issued an important safety notice. The potential hazard is associated with normal wear in your elevator. If your elevator develops the problem and it is not repaired, the elevator may drop unexpectedly with you in it and you may be injured. They recommend you contact your elevator service company.


Library
If you need something to keep you busy in this colder weather, make sure to visit the island library. The library is in the upstairs of Holden Beach Town Hall. All the books were donated. Patrons of the library don’t have to check out a book; they are on the honor system to return it.



Neighborhood Watch –

Need to look out for each other
Call 911 if you see or hear anything suspicious
Fill out Keep Check Request Form if you will be out of town
• Submit completed Property Registration Form
• Pickup copy of Protecting Your Home


Upon Further Review –

Guest Information


The Town’s Government Access Channel on
TWC / Spectrum (channel 8) has not been operational for over four (4) years now. Since TWC is the primary provider of cable on the island that is a problem.

.
Given that this channel provides valuable information to the tourists
there should be an effort made to getting it up and running again.


Seismic Testing / Offshore Drilling
Previously reported – September 2015
Resolution 15-09 is in opposition to offshore exploration and drilling. Why? Because we have a tourism based economy, along with the local fishing industry and quality of life depends on the health and welfare of our natural resources. We believe that the inherent risks to our region from offshore exploration and drilling have the potential to irrevocably harm our natural environment, our economic well-being and our overall quality of life. Including us there are now 79 municipalities that have passed resolutions opposing offshore exploration and drilling.

Previously reported – January 2018
Trump Moves to Open Nearly All Offshore Waters to Drilling
Read more » click here

Cooper: NC to sue if kept in offshore drilling plan
Governor threatens legal action if Trump administration pushes plan to open coast to oil exploration. “No way. Not off our coast,” Cooper said of oil exploration.
Read more » click here

North Carolina Gov. Cooper joins others in protest of federal fines for opposing offshore drilling
North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper has joined four other Atlantic coast governors to oppose the Enhancing State Management of Federal Lands and Waters Act, a proposal that could cost the state millions if it bans offshore drilling for oil and gas. Last Thursday, Cooper and governors from Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Jersey and Virginia called on Congress to reject the act, which would impose a tax on states that want to exempt more than half of federal lands from oil and gas leases.

Initial calculations estimate North Carolina could have to pay more than $500-million to receive a drilling waiver. “North Carolina should not have to pay a ransom to protect our beaches from the dangers of offshore drilling,” Cooper said in a prepared statement. “Our coastal communities generate more than 30,000 jobs and the risk posed by offshore drilling simply isn’t worth it.”

In a reversal of previous policy, the Trump administration has opened most of the Atlantic coast for potential leases. Cooper previously expressed opposition to seismic air gun tests and drilling. In January, he formally requested that North Carolina be exempt from leasing, a status already granted to Florida. Dozens of beach communities have passed resolutions against offshore drilling. Brunswick County’s governing board is now officially neutral on the issue, after earlier passing a resolution in support of drilling.
Read more » click here


Previously reported –
Holden Beach Newsletter
Chemours has issued a press release announcing that the company will take measures to eliminate byproduct GenX wastewater emissions from its Fayetteville site. Click here to view the release.

In order to keep citizens informed, Brunswick County has established a website to share information about GenX as they learn it. You can find this page at www.brunswickcountync.gov/genx. The website contains a FAQ section that they update as they learn additional information (or receive additional questions), links to all their press releases and links to other resources like information from NCDEQ. There is also a link where citizens can go to sign up to receive email updates on the topic.


The Public Information Officer for Brunswick County announced that the County has taken legal action against DuPont and Chemours for contaminating the Cape Fear River.

10.31.2017
Statement from Brunswick County
The filing of formal legal action against Chemours and DuPont represents another crucial step in protecting our public drinking water supply. It sends a clear message that Brunswick County will simply not stand for the discharge of emerging or unregulated chemicals into our public drinking water supply. Let us be clear…we will ensure that any company that threatens this vital resource is held responsible. Furthermore, our litigation team is consulting the nation’s leading experts to determine the best long-term water testing and treatment methods for the entire county. As part of that, we will ensure that the costs for doing so do not fall upon the rate payers, but upon those dumping the unregulated chemicals in the water.
For more information » click here

Wilmington officials ask NC to shut down GenX production
County officials are asking that the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) shut down operations that result in the production of chemicals like GenX, which have been discharged into the Cape Fear River and discovered in Wilmington-area drinking water systems.
Read more » click here

EPA to set GenX toxicity value
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will develop a toxicity value for the potential carcinogen GenX and related compounds, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt announced at a national leadership summit in Washington Tuesday.
Read more » click here

Update –
NC tells Chemours to keep GenX out of air, groundwater
DEQ filed proposed court order Monday that would require Chemours to reduce air emissions and address contamination caused by GenX around the Fayetteville Works facility
Read more » click here

Southern Environmental Law Center files lawsuit calling for DEQ action on GenX
The Southern Environmental Law Center filed a lawsuit in New Hanover County Superior Court calling on the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality to use its authority to require the Chemours Company to immediately stop all discharge of GenX and other chemically related compounds from its Fayetteville Works facility.

“The state needs to stop immediately Chemours’ toxic pollution of the air and water that families and communities from Fayetteville to Wilmington depend on,” said Geoff Gisler, senior attorney with the SELC. “Every day that goes by, Chemours puts more toxic pollution into the air and water that accumulates in our rivers, land, and groundwater. Chemours’ harmful pollution must end now.”

According to a Friday afternoon news release from the SELC, on June 15, DEQ denied a request from Cape Fear River Watch asking DEQ to require Chemours to stop pollution at its Fayetteville facility.     

SELC argues in the lawsuit that DEQ has the authority and obligation to force Chemours to stop releasing perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl (PFAS) substances into the water and air. “The people of North Carolina depend on DEQ to protect our health and safety in times of emergency,” said Cape Fear River Watch Board of Directors President Dana Sargent. “This is one of those times.”
Read more » click here


Anticipation for a safe, successful summer coming to newly dredged inlet
Over the last few summers, many boaters in Holden Beach or Oak Island stayed away from it. Now the Lockwood Folly Inlet has been dredged and we went to see how smooth sailing will be entering the summer. The inlet has for centuries been a part of nautical traffic. Those with the inlet association tell WWAY’s Andrew James that they almost lost it. Now it’s reportedly in the safest shape sailors have seen in years. For the last few summers Captain Cane Faircloth has not looked forward to the voyage. “We’d actually have to get going really fast and skip across the sandbar to navigate and get through it, which was super dangerous but it was the only choice that we had,” said the Captain who is also a founding member of the Lockwood Folly Association. That’s all because sand erosion was causing a built up shoaling at the mouth of the Lockwood Folly Inlet. Faircloth says, at low tide, it could be as shallow as 4 feet. For the past two seasons in Captain Faircloth’s business, Ollie Raja Charters, had to take visitors through the Shallotte River inlet or through the Cape Fear river. That after he and a group of boaters and shrimpers took a stand in 2016. “At the point when it all came together, the core of engineers told us we almost lost the inlet it was almost completely gone,” Faircloth said. They weathered the storm and the dredging came to remove the sand. The Army Core of Engineers completed it this past winter. Now the inlet is nearly double the depth at low tide as it was before. “Personally I would say the traffic has quadrupled on it since last year,” Faircloth said. It’s that kind of traffic Faircloth claims to also bring a boost to business in the way of fuel or equipment sales. Needless to say, it may not be the smoothest sailing as our Andrew James found out, but Faircloth says it certainly will be safer sailing. What we’re coming to learn is that the inlet is in the best shape it’s been in the last ten years.” Faircloth says they are still hoping the Coast Guard will put out more navigational beacons, buoys. right now two sit at the inlet’s mouth but eight have been ordered.
Read more » click here


Corrections & Amplifications –


Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM)

Previously reported –
The preliminary maps were published in August 2014

TOWN WEBSITE –
The Town has received approval from FEMA for revisions to the Holden Beach Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM). These map revisions will be effective August 28, 2018 once the Town formally updates our local ordinances. The Town staff is working on an implementation schedule and anticipates being able to use the new maps for construction in late May. These maps may be viewed at www.ncfloodmaps.com.

Breaking News –
I spoke with my insurance agent regarding the protocols for getting a policy rate reduction based on revisions to the Flood Insurance Rate Map. Unfortunately, you can’t get a reduction in your flood insurance rates until the new maps become effective at the end of August. After the August 28th effective date, on your policy renewal date, adjustments will be made retroactively if applicable.

FEMA has new floodplain maps.
Here are the changes expected in Southeastern NC
The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has released new floodplain maps, and soon, buildings will be rezoned to new designations for the first time in 12 years. This will result in policy changes for thousands of residents in the coastal and riparian floodplain. As the National Flood Insurance Program gets continually re-authorized and extended, FEMA has given municipalities until August 28 to comply with updated Flood Insurance Rate Map changes and regulations.
Read more » click here


Odds & Ends

 


Occupancy Tax Compliance

 

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New software will redefine how New Hanover County tracks Short Term Rentals
The county’s new approach – known as Short Term Rental Helper – is produced by Bear Cloud Software, and was developed out of a similar, albeit slightly more extreme, set of circumstances. New Hanover County’s use of STR Helper focuses largely on its tax revenue aspect. For Lisa Wurtzbacher, the county’s chief financial officer, the two important pieces are an online portal that allow rental owners to make monthly room occupancy tax payments online. It also allows the county to know when people who aren’t paying ROT book a room or building online. Some people might think that there’s a punitive aspect to the compliance side, but that’s not really it – we’re just asking people to pay for what they’re using. If you have one property paying (ROT) and then another one not, that’s not a level playing field,” Wurtzbacher said. ‘We think most people will find this system much easier to use (than the current mail-in system). We want it to a win-win.” The county plans to finalize its deal with STR Helper in April and roll out the program by July 1, the start of the county’s fiscal year.
Read more » click here


Your Reservation Has Changed: Regulating the Sharing-Economy
What can our county do to capture lost tax revenue?
STRs present counties with two kinds of tax revenue possibilities: sales tax and, in many places, occupancy taxes. And one common reason for STR regulation is to create a plan for tax collection. The sales tax applies to everyone throughout the state. However, a local act is needed to establish an occupancy tax.

Not all hope is lost for those wishing to collect the occupancy tax from local hosts. The Town of Ocean Isle has been extremely resourceful (and successful) in its approach to collecting the occupancy tax, and, according to tax collector Wendy Barbee, all it takes “is a little investigative work.” Barbee explained that the investigative work (which is handled by one customer service representative) includes scrolling through the online booking sites to identify new listings, locating those properties on the Brunswick County GIS, and notifying the homeowners of the requirement to pay the occupancy tax. To help with enforcement, the town sends a letter each December to property owners asking if they plan to rent their property in the following tax year. If so, the homeowner receives an occupancy tax coupon book to use in remitting the tax bill on a monthly basis. New homeowners are automatically sent a letter informing them of the obligation to pay local taxes on STR income. Barbee admits that the task of creating a master list of all STR properties was initially labor intensive. However, now the town primarily focuses on identifying new rentals, which they estimate to be about 40-50 properties per year.

The takeaway here is that local governments may want to get creative in their tax collection efforts, even if they opt out of regulating the overall use of STRs. Educating homeowners on this topic and making compliance easy are ways to ensure that your local government does not miss out on a sizable portion of funding.
Read more » click here

New Hanover County has had a hard time collecting occupancy tax. They have recently started to use a software program to track rentals against the receipt of occupancy taxes.  The County is buying the software with Towns able to opt in.  Brunswick County and the Town of Holden Beach both have a financial stake in making sure the 6% Occupancy Tax is collected. Ocean Isle has been successful in its approach of the collection of Occupancy Tax. They have increased collections and made it more convenient for their property owners to submit the tax. Maybe we should get more creative in our occupancy tax collection efforts too.


NC Department of Insurance press release
The North Carolina (NC) Rate Bureau in November 2017 proposed a significant rate increase for homeowner insurance rates across the State. On January 5, 2018, the NC Department of Insurance issued a press release announcing the NC Insurance Commissioner’s response to the request.

Insurance Commissioner Causey rejects proposed Homeowners Insurance rate increase: Sets Hearing Date
Read the press release » click here

Homeowners insurance to increase by 5.5 percent on the coast
Following months of negotiation, the N.C. Department of Insurance and the N.C. Rate Bureau have settled on an average statewide increase in homeowners insurance of 4.8 percent. In costal counties, that increase was capped at 5.5 percent.
Read more » click here

Insurance Commissioner settles homeowners’ insurance rate dispute
Insurance Commissioner Mike Causey announced today the N.C. Department of Insurance has ended the legal dispute with the North Carolina Rate Bureau on its proposal for an 18.7 percent homeowners’ insurance rate increase. Commissioner Causey has negotiated an almost 14 percent lower rate for an average 4.8 percent increase statewide. “I have negotiated a rate that will have minimal impact on the coast yet keep the state’s insurance companies financially sound,” said Commissioner Causey. The 4.8 percent increase will vary according to territory with a cap of 5.5 percent statewide instead of the 25 percent bump on the coast initially proposed by the NCRB. The agreement also covers insurance for tenants and condominiums, which is capped at 12 percent. This rate settlement will save consumers approximately $293 million in the first year alone, compared to the NCRB’s proposed increase.

The NCRB is separate from the NCDOI and is made up of insurance industry representatives. The Rate Bureau filed for the proposed 18.7 percent rate increase November 17, 2017, claiming the increase was necessary because of the increased costs stemming from tornado, severe thunderstorm, and windstorm/hail damage. Commissioner Causey had concerns over the initial filing and set a July 23, 2018, hearing date for the case to be decided if an agreement couldn’t be reached. Over the last several months, the Department and the NCRB have been in litigation while trying to settle the case without the necessity of a long, expensive hearing. The last time homeowners saw an insurance rate increase was in 2012. At that time, the NCRB case was settled for an average statewide increase of 7 percent. The increase will take effect October 1, 2018.
Read more » click here


This & That

New Visitor Map
Click here
to check out the Town’s new Visitor Map. The map features public accessways, parking, handicap parking, restrooms/ port-a-johns, showers, handicap accesses and parks.


Here’s how to stay safe from rip currents this summer
Rip currents prove to be a threat to beach goers on North Carolina’s coast every summer, and this year is no exception. In 2017, there were 12 rip current-related fatalities in North Carolina, according to the National Weather Service. Two were in Carolina Beach, one was in Holden Beach and another was in Wrightsville Beach. This year, three people drowned in rip currents in North Carolina in the first full week of June alone.
Read more » click here


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Sea Turtles Use Magnetic Fields
to Find Their Birthplace Beach


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Sea turtles use the earth’s magnetic fields to navigate back to the area where they were born decades earlier, according to a new study that used loggerhead genetics to investigate their travels. After swimming for years in a giant loop from nesting grounds in North Carolina and Florida to North Africa, the turtles find their way back to nest on beaches within about 40 to 50 miles of where they were born. The new study suggests that the turtles learned their home beach’s distinctive magnetic signature, through what is called geomagnetic imprinting.
Read more » click here

 

Turtle Watch Program – 2018

. 1) Current nest count is 25 as of 07/14/18
.   • I
n 2017 the nest count was 39
.   • Average annual number of nests is 39.5
. 2)
First nest of the season was on May 20th


.
Members of the patrol started riding the beach every morning on May 1 and will do so through October looking for signs of turtle nests.
For more information » click here

Turtle Talks hatch for another season
The Holden Beach Turtle Patrol’s first Turtle Talk of the summer will be June 6. Turtle Talk will begin at 7 p.m. at Holden Beach Town Hall at 110 Rothschild St. on Holden Beach. The doors open at 6:30 p.m. and seating is limited.

This free weekly educational program will be conducted each Wednesday evening in June, July and August, including July 4. The program shares information about the Turtle Patrol, the sea turtles and how vacationers and residents can help the sea turtles that nest on Holden Beach.

Several turtle artifacts will be on display and educational materials available. The 45-minute presentation includes a short video about the lifecycle of the sea turtle. Members of the Holden Beach Turtle Patrol will be available to answer questions about the turtles and the program. Turtle Talk is open to all family members and enjoyed by people of all ages with no admission charge.

The Holden Beach Turtle Patrol also offers a program for younger turtle enthusiasts. Children’s Turtle Time will be at 4 p.m. Wednesdays, June 27, July 11, July 18, 25 and Aug. 1 at the Holden Beach Town Hall. This class will feature crafts, stories and activities for children 3-6. All children must be accompanied by a parent or guardian. For more information on this program, call the Holden Beach Parks and Recreation Department at 842-6488.

Holden Beach is a turtle sanctuary and every year sea turtles are welcomed and protected on the beach. Founded in 1989, the HBTP protects sea turtles through education, nest protection and sea turtle rescue. The Turtle Patrol operates under the authority of the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. In its 30th year, this all-volunteer program is supported by sale of an annual T-shirt and donations.

This year’s shirt is maroon and celebrates “30 Years and Still Counting.” The shirts are $15 for the youth sizes and $17 for the adults and 2X and 3X will be $20. Long-sleeved shirts are $22 for S to XL and $25 for 2X and 3X. T-shirts will be available for sale at Turtle Talk programs and at the Lighthouse Gift Shop on the causeway in Holden Beach. Shirts are also available by mail (see the website for details).

For more information on Turtle Talk, the Holden Beach Turtle Patrol or how to volunteer or support, go to www.hbturtlewatch.org.
Read more » click here


Factoid That May Interest Only Me –The National Flood Insurance Program
The National Flood Insurance Program aims to reduce the impact of flooding on private and public structures. It does so by providing affordable insurance to property owners and by encouraging communities to adopt and enforce floodplain management regulations. These efforts help mitigate the effects of flooding on new and improved structures. Overall, the program reduces the socio-economic impact of disasters by promoting the purchase and retention of general risk insurance, but also of flood insurance, specifically.
Read more » click here

National Flood Insurance Program: Reauthorization
Congress must periodically renew the NFIP’s statutory authority to operate. On March 23, 2018, the President signed legislation passed by Congress that extends the National Flood Insurance Program’s (NFIP’s) authorization to July 31, 2018. Congress must now reauthorize the NFIP by no later than 11:59 pm on July 31, 2018.

FEMA and Congress have never failed to honor the flood insurance contracts in place with NFIP policyholders. In the unlikely event the NFIP’s authorization lapses, FEMA would still have authority to ensure the payment of valid claims with available funds. However, FEMA would stop selling and renewing policies for millions of properties in communities across the nation. Nationwide, the National Association of Realtors estimates that a lapse might impact approximately 40,000 home sale closings per month.

NFIP reauthorization is an opportunity for Congress to take bold steps to reduce the complexity of the program while transitioning it to a sounder financial framework. The level of damage from the 2017 hurricanes makes it abundantly clear that FEMA needs a holistic plan to ready the Nation for managing the cost of catastrophic flooding under the NFIP.
Read more » click here

Update –


Flood insurance program could lapse in midst of hurricane season.

What home buyers need to know

  • The federal flood insurance program already has been reauthorized six times since September 2017.
  • When the program lapsed for a month in 2010, an estimated 1,400 home-sales closings were canceled or delayed each day.
  • In some high-risk areas, the only option for coverage is through the government plan.
    Read more » click here

Hurricane Season Has Begun. Do You Need Flood Insurance?
The Atlantic hurricane season is here, and with it the threat of storm-related flooding. So homeowners may want to buy flood insurance, if they don’t already have coverage. Hurricane season runs from June through November. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has forecast a “near- or above-normal” hurricane season this year, with one to four “major” hurricanes expected. Standard homeowner policies typically don’t cover damage from floodwaters resulting from rising tides, flash floods or overflowing streams. To get flood coverage, you’ll need to buy a separate flood policy. Most flood insurance is sold through the National Flood Insurance Program, which is administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and covers about five million policyholders. A few private companies also sell coverage.
Read more » click here

Long-term NFIP reauthorization is essential
The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP)’s five-year authorization originally expired on September 30, 2017. Congress had not agreed to reforms in time for a reauthorization bill to be signed into law by its expiration date, so it was included in a short-term extension of federal government spending, an ominous sign for an already-troubled program. The program was then subjected to four additional short-term extensions between December and March. In March, during the debate over the omnibus appropriations package to fund the government for the rest of fiscal year 2018 (FY18), Congress decided to separate the NFIP from the appropriations process and extend it alone until July 31, 2018, while the rest of the government appropriations were made to last through the end of FY18.
Read more » click here


Things I Think I Think –

Dining #2Eating out is one of the great little joys of life.

Restaurant Review:
Dinner Club visits a new restaurant once a month. Ratings reflect the reviewer’s reaction to food, ambience and service, with price taken into consideration.
///// April 2018
Name:             WaterScapes at the Marina Inn
Cuisine:          American
Location:       8121 Amalfi Place, Myrtle Beach, SC
Contact:         843.913.2845 / www.waterscapesrestaurant.com
Food:               Average / Very Good / Excellent / Exceptional
Service:          Efficient / Proficient / Professional / Expert
Ambience:     Drab / Plain / Distinct / Elegant
Cost:                Inexpensive <=17 / Moderate <=22 / Expensive <=27 / Exorbitant <=40
Rating:           Three Stars
WaterScapes is a fine dining restaurant located on the lower level of the Marina Inn at the Grande Dunes resort in Myrtle Beach. New American cuisine is presented in a warm, refined atmosphere with both inside and outside waterfront dining options. They have a very limited menu, divided into Small Plates and Large Plates, that only offers about a dozen entrée choices following the trend of menu simplification. It’s a little pricey, but the food was excellent and well worth the price, so not your any-night-of-the-week restaurant. This restaurant is significantly better than most of the other restaurant offerings in the area, it is one of the few quality dining options in Myrtle Beach, an extraordinarily good restaurant that does not disappoint.  Overall, we had an outstanding dining experience, it was worth the trip.


/////
Book Review:
Read several books from The New York Times best sellers fiction list monthly
Selection represents this month’s pick of the litter
/////


THE WANTED
by Robert Crais
This is the seventeenth entry in the series of Private Investigator Elvis Cole novels. Concerned about her son, a single mother hires Cole to investigate things, which turn out to be much worse than she ever imagined.
In the latest book, a teenager with two other partners, have been responsible for a string of high-end burglaries. They are pursued by villains hired to recover a stolen laptop. They stole the wrong thing from the wrong man.

 


HBPOIN / Lou’s Views
.        
• Gather and disseminate information
.          • Identify the issues and determine how they affect you
.          • Act as a watchdog
.          • Grass roots monthly newsletter since 2008

https://lousviews.com/

06 -Town Meeting

Lou’s Views

Town Meeting 06/19/18

“Unofficial” Minutes & Comments


Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet
For more information
» click here


Noel Fox the Town Attorney legal recommendation was to change the meeting agenda and remove the Public Hearing. Noel said that we need to measure twice but cut once. The Town received approval from FEMA for revisions to the Holden Beach Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM). These map revisions will be effective August 28, 2018 once the Town formally updates our local Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance. Not to worry, we just need to get this done before the August effective date.

PUBLIC HEARING:
Proposed Ordinance to Incorporate New Flood Insurance Rate Maps into the Holden Beach Code of Ordinances (Ordinance 18-11, An Ordinance Amending the Holden Beach Code of Ordinances, Chapter 154: Flood Damage Prevention, Section 154.05, Basis for Establishing the Special Flood Hazard Areas) and An Update to the Town’s Official Zoning Map to Reflect the New FEMA Approved Flood Zones. 

TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH / ORDINANCE 18 – 11

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE HOLDEN BEACH CODE OF ORDINANCES, CHAPTER 154: FLOOD DAMAGE PREVENTION (SECTION 154.05 BASIS FOR ESTABLISHING THE SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARD AREAS)

BE IT ORDAINED BY the Mayor and Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach, North Carolina that the Holden Beach Code of Ordinances, Chapter 154: Flood Damage Prevention be amended as follows:

Section One:
Amend Section 154.05 Basis for Establishing the Special Flood Hazard Areas as follows (new wording in red):

§154.05 BASIS FOR ESTABLISHING THE SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARD AREAS.
The special flood hazard areas are those identified under the Cooperating Technical State (CTS) agreement between the State of North Carolina and FEMA in its Flood Insurance Study (FIS) and its accompanying Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM), for Brunswick County dated August 28, 2018, which are adopted by reference and declared to be a part of this chapter.

Section Two:
The Town Clerk is directed to forward this ordinance to American Legal Publishing for inclusion in the next published supplement to the Holden Beach Code of Ordinances.

Section Three:
This ordinance shall be effective the 20th day of June, 2018.


 1. Public Comments on Agenda Items

There were no comments


2. Discussion and Possible Action – Construction Management Services of the Vacuum Sewer System #4 Upgrade Status Report – Public Works Director Clemmons 

Previously reported – December 2017
McGill and Associates were commissioned to perform a Sewer Study to evaluate sewer system vulnerability reducing measures. A fiscal year 2017-2018 budget appropriation of $1,413,000 was made to accommodate total programmatic expenses of Lift Station #4 improvements. Green Engineering firm was awarded the $158,000 contract for Sewer System #4 upgrade. Green Engineering will provide all engineering services required to construct a vulnerability reducing structure of Lift Station #4.

Previously reported – April 2018
Four (4) meetings have been held between staff and the engineering firm to date. The final plans were delivered to the Town and have been reviewed and approved by the Building Inspector. Deliverables – Timeline has been revised. Buildings were designed in the same style as Town Hall. We are currently on schedule, but Chris cautioned that it was still early in the game. The Board requested monthly updates, reporting on whether we remained on schedule and within budget.

Previously reported – May 2018
We’ve had a slight setback, we did not receive the three (3) bids required to move forward. Officially we accepted no bids, the two bids submitted will be held and opened upon the completion of the second go round. Chris was a little surprised and disappointed since their appeared to be a lot of interest when they held meeting with vendors. We will need to start the bid process over. The protocols on the second bid process do not require the three bids but the caveat is we can only consider quality bids.

Update –
BOC’s SPECIAL MEETING / May 23, 2018     
Approved award of the Lift Station #4 upgrade contract to T.A. Loving Company in the amount of $1,205,000

Total project cost went from $1,413,000 to $1,695,700 or a $282,700 difference
Contingency funds were reduced from $157,400 to $52,480 or a $104,920 difference
Bottomline, the project cost just went up $387,620 ($282,700 + $104,920) or @27% (Yikes!)

A pre-construction meeting is scheduled for June 28th
We should have a tentative construction start date then

 My Two Cents - CR II

.
This really could be handled with a memo from Chris to the Board.
It is unnecessary to have a monthly presentation to report the number of meetings that were held, number and amount of checks that were cut. Presentation should only be made if something significant has transpired.


3. Police Report – Chief Wally Layne

Police Patch
Typical summertime fun at the beach

We are just beginning the hurricane season –
make sure your plans are in order


Personnel Changes –
The Officer they hired is onboard and is doing field training


Public Safety Announcement
Chief Layne would like to remind everyone that it is important to protect your personal property. Annual event – transition from home break- ins to vehicle break- ins. Most crimes are crimes of opportunity. He used the term break-ins loosely since most of the vehicles were left unlocked. He preaches the same sermon to us each year to protect your personal property. Don’t be a volunteer victim! Remove all items of value from your vehicle when you are not driving it. Always lock your vehicle doors when you are not in it. Leaving items on display, whether on the dashboard or sitting on a passenger seat, is an invitation to opportunist individuals. Make sure to follow these important tips!


Crime Prevention 101 – Don’t make it easy for them
Don’t leave vehicles unlocked
Don’t leave valuables in your vehicles


A reminder of the Town’s beach strand ordinances:
…..1)
Chapter 90 / Animals / § 90.20 / Responsibilities of owners
…….a)
pets are not allowed on the beach strand except between 5p.m. and 9a.m. daily
…….b)
dog’s must be on a leash at all times
…….c)
owner’s need to clean up after their animals
…..2)
Chapter 94 / Beach regulations / § 94.05 / Digging of holes on beach strand
…….a)
digging holes greater than 12 inches deep without responsible person there
…….b)
holes shall be filled in prior to leaving
…..3)
Chapter 94 / Beach regulations / § 94.06 / Placing obstructions on the beach strand
…….a)
all unattended beach equipment must be removed daily by 6:00pm


Pets on the beach strand
Pets – Chapter 90 / Animals / § 90.20
From May 20th through September 10th
It is unlawful to have any pet on the beach strand
. • During the hours of 9:00am through 5:00pm

Unattended Gear
Ordinance 94.06 was passed on September 14, 2010. Beginning April 23, 2011, all unattended beach equipment must be removed from the beach by its owner or permitted user daily. All unattended personal equipment remaining on the beach between the hours of 6PM and 7AM will be classified as abandoned property and will be disposed of by the Town.

Educational Sign
The Town has put flashing educational signs at the bottom of the bridge on the island side. The sign messages were a huge help last year minimizing the need for Beach Strand Ordinance Enforcement. It has been the most effective communication medium used to date. Intent is to educate people before they get on the beach strand.

Defensive Driving
Be mindful on the road, tourists are out there and frankly many of them are not paying attention. Defensive driving is driving characterized by prudence, diligence and reasonable cautiousness. Its aim is to reduce the risk of collision by anticipating dangerous situations, despite adverse conditions or the actions of others.

Golf Carts
Golf carts are treated the same as other automotive vehicles
Town ordinances state no parking anytime on OBW
Therefore golf carts are illegally parked when left by any beach access points


Golf Cart Reminders

In the State of North Carolina, if a golf cart is to be operated on the streets, highways or public vehicular areas, it is considered a motor vehicle and subject to all laws, rules and regulations that govern motor vehicles. In short, the golf cart must have all of the following:
    • The driver MUST have a current, valid Driver’s License
.     • Child Restraint Laws must be followed
.     • Headlights
.     • Tail lights
.     • Turn signals
.     • Rear view mirrors
    • State Inspection Sticker
.     • License Plate Issued by NCDMV
.     • Liability Insurance

Since most Golf carts are purchased and a bill of sale is given to the buyer, the owner must apply for a title through the NC License Plate Office. In order to receive a title through this agency, you must have a notarized bill of sale and proof of liability insurance. If the golf cart is purchased from a dealer, you must also have the certificate of origin for the vehicle.

All of the streets in the Town (including the side streets) are considered streets or public vehicular areas according to the State Law. This means that to operate a golf cart anywhere on the island, you must meet the standards above. Also, golf carts may not be operated on streets with posted speed limit greater than 35 mph. 

Neighborhood Watch

  • Need to look out for each other and report any suspicious activity
  • Call 911 if you see or hear anything suspicious
  • Fill out Keep Check Request Form if you will be out of town
  • Submit completed Property Registration Form
  • Pickup copy of Protecting Your Home

Noel Fox the Town Attorney legal recommendation was to change the meeting agenda and remove this item.

4. Discussion and Possible Approval of Ordinance 18-11, An Ordinance Amending the Holden Beach Code of Ordinances, Chapter 154: Flood Damage Prevention (Section 154.05, Basis for Establishing the Special Flood Hazard Areas) – Building Official Evans

Agenda Packet –
The model flood plain ordinance is a mandatory requirement for participants in the National Flood Insurance Program. Adoption allows homeowners to have access to affordable government regulated insurance. The adoption of the revisions of the zoning ordinance to include the flood zone overlays provides the community with a consistent map, meeting the state requirements for updates.

 TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH / ORDINANCE 18-11

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE HOLDEN BEACH CODE OF ORDINANCES, CHAPTER 154: FLOOD DAMAGE PREVENTION (SECTION 154.05 BASIS FOR ESTABLISIDNG THE SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARD AREAS)

BE IT ORDAINED BY the Mayor and Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach, North Carolina that the Holden Beach Code of Ordinances, Chapter 154:  Flood Damage Prevention be amended as follows:

Section One: Amend Section 154.05 Basis for Establishing the Special Flood Hazard Areas; as follows (new wording in red):

§154.05 BASIS FOR ESTABLISHING THE SPECIAL FLOOD HAZARD AREAS.
The special flood hazard areas are those identified under the Cooperating Technical State (CTS) agreement between the State of North Carolina and FEMA in its Flood Insurance Study (FIS) and its accompanying Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM), for Brunswick County dated August 28, 2018, which are adopted by reference and declared to be a part of this chapter.

Section Two: The Town Clerk is directed to forward this ordinance to American Legal Publishing for inclusion in the next published supplement to the Holden Beach Code of Ordinances.

Section Three: This ordinance shall be effective the 20th day of June, 2018.


Noel Fox the Town Attorney legal recommendation was to change the meeting agenda and remove this item.

5. Discussion and Possible Approval of Resolution 18-03, An Ordinance Amending the Official Zoning Map of the Town of Holden Beach – Building Official Evans

TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH / RESOLUTION 18-03

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE OFFICIAL ZONING MAP OF THE TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH

WHEREAS, FEMA has approved revisions to the Holden Beach Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM); and

WHEREAS
, These map revisions will be effective August 28, 2018 and be incorporated into the Town’s Code of Ordinances, with the adoption of Ordinance 18-11, An Ordinance Amending the Holden Beach Code of Ordinance, Chapter 154, Flood Damage Prevention (Section 154.05 Basis for Establishing the Special Flood Hazard Area); and

WHEREAS, The Town’s official zoning map is also proposed to be updated to reflect the new FEMA approved FIRM.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Holden Beach Board of Commissioners that the map created by Gary Gurganus land Surveying, dated May 29, 2018 supersedes and replaces the current zoning map as the official zoning map of the Town of Holden Beach.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED by the Holden Beach Board of Commissioners that the new official zoning map shall be identified by the signature of the Mayor, attested by the Town Clerk and bear the seal of the Town.

Previously reported – February 2018
Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM)
The preliminary maps were published in August 2014. In February 2018 the Town received approval from FEMA for revisions to the Holden Beach Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM). These map revisions will be effective August 28, 2018 once the Town formally updates our local ordinances. The Town staff is working on an implementation schedule and anticipates being able to use the new maps for construction in late May.

Previously reported – April 2018
North Carolina General Statutes require public hearings for adoption and amendment of land use ordinances, and a Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance is considered a land use ordinance.

o   County – § 153A-323

o   Municipality – § 160A-364

Before adopting or amending any ordinance authorized by this …, the [community] shall hold a public hearing on it. A notice of the public hearing shall be given once a week for two successive calendar weeks in a newspaper having general circulation in the area. The notice shall be published the first time not less than 10 days nor more than 25 days before the date fixed for the hearing. In computing such period, the day of publication is not to be included but the day of the hearing shall be included.

The Town needs to adopt FPM Ordinance for it to be effective on August28, 2018. Tim will submit Ordinance at the next scheduled regular meeting for the BOC’s approval. We can start using the preliminary maps once we adopt the Ordinance. But we can’t get a reduction in our flood insurance rates until the new maps become effective at the end of August.

TOWN WEBSITE –
The Town has received approval from FEMA for revisions to the Holden Beach Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM). These map revisions will be effective August 28, 2018 once the Town formally updates our local ordinances. The Town staff is working on an implementation schedule and anticipates being able to use the new maps for construction in late May. These maps may be viewed at http://www.ncfloodmaps.com.

Previously reported – May 2018
The Board has scheduled to hold a Public Hearing at the BOC’s June Regular Meeting


6. Discussion and Possible Approval of Resolution 18-04, Resolution Adopting System Development Fees Report –Public Works Director Clemmons

TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH / RESOLUTION 18-04

RESOLUTION ADOPTING SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT FEES REPORT

WHEREAS, Session law 2017-138 (House Bill 436) known as the “Public Water and Sewer System Development Fee Act” sets certain standards and limitations before a town may adopt a system development fee for water and sewer service; and

WHEREAS, said Act requires that a system development fee be established only after written analysis prepared by a qualified financial professional or qualified licensed professional engineer in a manner as set forth in said Act; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach has retained McGill Associates, a qualified and licensed professional engineer and consulting firm, to perform said analysis in accordance with said Act; and

WHEREAS, McGill Associates has performed said analysis and delivered a written report to the Town of Holden Beach pursuant to said Act; and

WHEREAS, the Audit Committee of the Town of Holden Beach has reviewed the report and had no comment other than it appeared to be accomplished in accordance with the Act; and

WHEREAS, the analysis has been posted on the Town’s website as required in said Act and a public hearing has been held as required in said Act; and

WHEREAS, all other conditions, standards and requirements of said Act has been satisfied.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLIVED by the Holden Beach Board of Commissioners that the Town hereby adopts and approves the Cost-Justified Water and Wastewater System Development Fees Report created by McGill Associates, dated March 2018.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


7. Discussion and Possible Approval or Resolution 18-05, Resolution Amending the Fee Schedule for the Town of Holden Beach – Public Works Director Clemmons

TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH / RESOLUTION 18-05

 RESOULUTION AMENDING THE HOLDEN BEACH FEE SCHEDULE

WHEREAS. the Town of Holden Beach Board of Commissioners adopted the Cost-Justified Water and Wastewater System Development   Fees Report created by McGill Associates, dated March 2018; and

WHEREAS, the Holden Beach Fee Schedule needs to be updated to reflect the recommendations in the Report.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach, North Carolina does hereby approve the deletion of the Impact Fees and the Share Cost sections and the addition of the Water and Sewer System Development Fees (Attachment 1) to the Holden Beach Fee Schedule.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


8. Discussion and Possible Approval of Ordinance 18-10, An Ordinance to Appropriate Revenues and Authorize Expenses for the Fiscal Year Beginning July 1, 2018 and Ending June 30, 2019 – Town Manager Hewett 

No presentation was made
Proposed budget balanced with revenues equaling expenses

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

BOC’s approved the town’s $20.9 million-dollar budget ordinance for the upcoming fiscal year.

In the past, Hewett did a presentation that included the following:
.     1)
Highlights
.     2) What it does
.     3) What it doesn’t do
.     4) Concerns

Ad Valorem Tax
Estimated 2018 tax base is $1,226,337 with tax rate of $.220 per $100 of assessed value
.       a) $1,226,337 X $.220 = $2,697,941
.       b) $2,697,941 X 98.54 = $2,658,551
        •
Tax collection rate of 98.54%

A penny generates $122,634 of tax revenue

 

 

The Town’s $20.9 million-dollar 2018-19 fiscal year budget was adopted as submitted. In previous years the budget message has been accepted as a fait accompli; in other words, the Board has accepted the proposed budget in its entirety. There was a bit more dialogue this year, but still don’t see how things are much different.


9. Discussion and Possible Nomination of Members to the Inlet and Beach Protection Board – Town Clerk Finnell

Previously reported – April 2018
Ordinance 18-02
An Ordinance Establishing the Inlet and Beach Protection Board

§35.02 POWERS AND DUTIES.

The Inlet and Beach Protection Board shall:

(A) Serve as an advisory board for the town;

(B) Prepare and recommend to the Board of Commissioners, a comprehensive long-term plan for the Town’s role, if any, in the management, dredging and protection of the Lockwood Folly and Shallotte Inlets, including their respective navigational channels, and the management, protection and nourishment of the town’s ocean beaches and protective dune systems

(C) Evaluate the feasibility and cost and benefits of proposed dredging projects, beach and/or dune nourishment projects and protective structure projects to the town and to property owners within the town as a whole, and make recommendations to the Board of Commissioners with respect to such projects;

(D)  With the assistance of the Attorney assigned to support the Inlet and Beach Protection

Board make recommendations   to the Board of Commissioners for amendments   or modifications to the town’s ordinances with respect to the “frontal dune” and “protective dune system”;

(E)  With the assistance of the Attorney assigned to support the Inlet and Beach Protection Board, make recommendations to the Board of Commissioners for modifications to the town’s ordinances with respect to public and private beach access walkways which promote protection and growth of the town’s protective dune systems;

 (F) Serve as a link between the Board of Commissioners, Town Manager and the community on the above described areas;

(G) Perform such other duties within or related to the general purview of the Inlet and Beach Protection Board which may assigned to it from time-to-time by the Board of Commissioners.

Update –
Eight members of the public put in an application for the five Board positions. BOC’s appointed five (5) members to the Board. The Board selected – Ronda Dixon, Vicki Myers, Mike Pearson, Richard Rice, and Dean Thomas.


I’m a little confused. The BOC’s appointed members to the Board without even interviewing some of them.
Nothing for nothing, but it makes the interview process appear to be a charade.

 


10. Discussion and Possible Scheduling of a Date to Hold Interviews for Upcoming Vacancies on Town Boards – Town Clerk Finnell

If needed, they will schedule a Special Meeting fifteen (15) minutes before the next Regular Meeting.


11. Discussion of Suggested Rules of Procedure and Consideration of Appropriateness to Create an Amended Ordinance – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Previously reported – December 2017
The Board of Commissioners are required to adopt Rules of Procedure per the Town’s Code of Ordinances Section §30.19.

§30.19 RULES OF PROCEDURE.
The BOC shall adopt such rules of procedure not inconsistent with North Carolina General Statutes at their regular scheduled meeting each December, or at other such times deemed appropriate, and publish same in the office of the Town Clerk.

This Board chose to continue under the current rules adopted by the previous Board. They plan to revisit this issue after the three (3) new members of the Board complete their training course

Previously reported – April 2018
Commissioner Kwiatkowski attempted to incorporate the suggested Rules of Procedure for a City Council that was recently released by the School of Government with the version the 2015- 2017 Board adopted. It did not go well. Commissioner Kwiatkowski and Commissioner Freer have agreed to work together and try to resolve.  Mayor Pro Tem Sullivan recommended rather than meld the two they should use the School of Government template and modify that document making only minor adjustments.

 Update –
Commissioner Patricia Kwiatkowski made the presentation. Pat wanted both the Board and the public to have an opportunity to look at it before it was adopted. They are scheduled to vote on it at the next Regular Meeting.

No decision was made – No action taken


12. Discussion and Possible Approval of Resolution 18-06, Resolution Designating July as Park and Recreation Month – Assistant Town Manager Ferguson

TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH / RESOLUTION 18-06

Designation of July as Park and Recreation Month

WHEREAS parks and recreation programs are an integral part of communities throughout this country, including The Town of Holden Beach; and

WHEREAS parks and recreation is vitally important to establishing and maintaining the quality of life in our communities, ensuring the health of all citizens, and contributing to the economic and environmental well-being of a community and region; and

WHEREAS parks and recreation programs build healthy, active communities that aid in the prevention of chronic disease; enhance the quality of life for residents and visitors by providing exceptional recreational, cultural and educational activities and volunteer opportunities; and also improve the mental and emotional health of all citizens; and

WHEREAS parks and recreation programs increase a community’s economic prosperity through increased property values, expansion of the local tax base, increased tourism, the attraction and retention of businesses, and crime reduction; and

WHEREAS parks and recreation areas are fundamental to the environmental well-being of our community; and

WHEREAS parks and natural recreation areas improve water quality, protect groundwater, prevent flooding, improve the quality of the air we breathe, provide vegetative buffers to development, and produce habitat for wildlife; and

WHEREAS our parks and natural recreation areas ensure the ecological beauty of our community and provide a place for children and adults to connect with nature and recreate outdoors; and

WHEREAS the U.S. House of Representatives has designated July as Park and Recreation Month; and

WHEREAS grant funding through US Fish and Wildlife, NC Division of Environmental Quality, and the NC Parks and Recreation Trust Fund has been instrumental in offsetting the cost of park construction projects to the Town; and

WHEREAS the Town of Holden Beach recognizes the benefits derived from parks and recreation resources.

NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY the Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach that July is recognized as Park and Recreation Month in the Town of Holden Beach.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


13. Town Manager’s Report

Roadway Work
Highland Paving has completed the maintenance of existing streets on the island. The streets that had work done this year were Marlin and Boyd.

Pointe West Storm Water Project
Vendor has completed his portion of the project.
The Town still has to complete its portion of the project.

 Scotch Bonnet
The Town installed drainage pipe to fix storm water issue

Canal Dredging
Previously reported – December 2017
Adoption Resolution 17-10, Water Resources Development Grant ($1,439,922)
The grant is good for two years and will accelerate our current dredging schedule. Each canal will be responsible for paying for their dredging project costs upfront. It is a reimbursement grant which means we do not receive the funds from the state until after satisfactory completion of the project.

The Town is planning to perform a complete dredge of all of the canals this coming fall/winter (November 2018 – Mar 2019). We have been apprised of recent changes regarding the obtainment of consent agreements for USACE dredge spoil areas.   Those changes will result in closer scrutiny of remaining capacity in existing sites; hence longer/unknown lead times and quite possibly denial of permission to place material from this fall’s canal maintenance dredging in the Corps disposal sites. The Town has been preparing the area adjacent to the dog park as an alternate site if unable to use the USACE dredge spoil areas. David reminded us that this is a big undertaking with lots of moving parts and will require considerable time and effort from the Town staff to pull it off without a hitch.

Curbside Recycling Program   
Waste Industries provides curbside recycling for Town properties that desire to participate in the service. We now have approximately four hundred and fifty (450) residents that participate in the recycling program.

Fire Hydrants
Public Works crew just completed the exercise of flushing the system


14. Executive Session Pursuant to North Carolina General Statute 143-318.11(a)(3) to Consider the Performance of an Employee


General Comments –

There were thirty-nine (39) members of the community in attendance

The BOC’s July Regular Meeting has been  rescheduled to the second Tuesday of the month, July 10th

Town Manager’s Review
The Town Managers performance review was supposed to be done on the anniversary date of his hire which is in February. Once again it was not done in a timely manner.

Corrections & Amplifications –

Apparently one of our subscribers (singular) took umbrage to My2Cents views on the Assistant Town Manager position. I was chastised for being overly negative. Be that as it may; our role involves informing people and I accurately reported the facts.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯ Sheesh!

Let’s revisit the situation again, shall we.

We have a Town Manager that makes $136,500, with just twenty-four (24) employees
We have a Police Chief with max salary of $86,000, with seven (7) subordinates
We have a Public Works Director with max salary of $81,000, with five (5) subordinates
We have a Planning Director with max salary of $69,000, with two (2) subordinates
We now have an Assistant TM with max salary of $74,000, with zero (0) subordinates

We have lots of Chiefs; Indians not so much.

The question that is being asked is: Why do we even need an Assistant Town Manager?
.
A need is something you have to have. It’s something you can’t do without.

In 2014 the max salary for Recreation Director position was $39,395 in 2018, just four years later, the max salary is now $74,063 a whapping 88% increase. Just so you know, when the position was originally created the consensus was why do we even need a Recreation Director. They asked: What are we a cruise ship? Keep in mind, Christy does not have a degree in local government administration or practical experience in municipal government administration. Despite the change in her title and salary she will basically continue to do what she is doing right now. In essence we’ve given Christy the title of Assistant Town Manager with the corresponding salary pay range without any of the duties or responsibilities that comes with that position.

They also posed the question, what have my comments done to staff morale. If there is a morale issue it’s not because of my views. More likely it’s because we gave the Town Manager a 39% salary increase and now we are giving the Recreation Manager a 19% increase while the rest of the staff is lucky to get a 3% merit increase.

I’d like to point out that I have never made one negative remark about Christy or the job she is doing. In fact, on several occasions I have given her Kudos and have acknowledged her contributions to our island. I get it, everyone loves Christy, and no one is objecting to that she has earned a salary increase. But the justification for the position reclassification and pay range change is weak. She is doing the same job, still doesn’t supervise anyone, and has no administrative responsibilities. Sorry, but I simply don’t understand how this makes any sense.

Once again, to be perfectly clear this has nothing to do with how I feel about the Town Manager or the Shoreline Protection & Recreation Manager and the jobs that they are doing, it is strictly about the BOC’s fiduciary responsibilities to us.

Keep in mind, the views expressed here are simply my opinion based on the facts as I understand them. I just tell it like it is and that is why people read the newsletter.
After all it is called “Lou’s Views”!


Budget
Kickoff of our budget season
Local governments must balance their budget by a combination of the following:
. 1)
Raising taxes
. 2)
Cutting spending
. 3)
Operating more efficiently
The Town Manager’s proposed budget is due by June 1st
Commissioners must adopt budget no later than June 30th for the next fiscal year

Adopting the annual budget is a primary responsibility of the Board.

Budget Meeting Schedule / 2018
. 1) 16 January BOC’s Workshop Goals & Objectives / Capital Program
* Only eleven (11) members of the community were in attendance
. 2) 19 January BOC’s Workshop Goals & Objectives
*
Only two (2) members of the community were in attendance
. 3) 23 February Canal Dredging Working Group
. 4)
9 March Departments input to Manager
. 5) 6 April
BOC’s Workshop Revenues
* Only five (5) members of the community were in attendance
. 6)
13 April BOC’s Workshop Expenses
* Only five (5) members of the community were in attendance
. 7) 3 May BOC’s Workshop Revenues & Expenses
* Only five (5) members of the community were in attendance
. 8) 23 May Special Meeting
* Only five (5) members of the community were in attendance
. 9)
31 May Budget Message
. 10)
13 June Public Hearing
* Only six (6) members of the community were in attendance
. 11)
19 June Regular BOC’s Meeting
. 12)
30 June Budget adopted (No Later Than)


Brunswick County budget proposes no tax increase, public hearing June 18
Brunswick County Manager Ann Hardy presented the 2018-19 budget proposal to county commissioners Monday night showing an operating budget of $242,689,100 with no increase in the tax rate. The property tax rate would remain at 48.50 cents for a fourth year.
Read more » click here


BOC’s SPECIAL MEETING / May 3, 2018
. 1) Budget Workshop Revenue and Expense
. 2) Budget Goals Status

The request made by the Board was for a top-level management summary. They simply want the Finance Department to roll-up the numbers from the Budget Message. It took the better part of an hour for them to get the Town Manager to agree to this requested reporting change. You can’t make this stuff up!

Once again, the Board talked about making changes. They want to have more input with greater participation in the process. To accomplish that will require scheduling additional workshop meetings. Sound familiar?

BOC’s SPECIAL MEETING / January 2017
Budget Workshop takeaways are as follows:
. 1)
Board wants to be more involved in the budget process
. 2)
Modified meeting schedule to have more time to discuss issues
. 3)
Board wants to take a Fiscal Conservative Approach
. 4)
Board wants to be engaged and have input not just rubber stamp submitted budget

It is now some sixteen (16) months later and all things are as they were …


BOC’s SPECIAL MEETING / May 23, 2018  
.     1.
Discussion and Possible Award of Contract and Associated Items for Vacuum Sewer System #4 Upgrade Green Engineering
      a)
Award of Contract
.       b)
Temporary Easement Agreement between the Town and Holden Beach West Property Owners Association
.       c)
Ordinance 1809, An Ordinance Amending Ordinance 1708, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance for Fiscal Year 2017 2018 (Amendment No.4)

Re: Lift Station #4 Upgrade Contract Award and Associated Items

This memo proposes the BOC consider approval of the three items necessary to proceed with the upgrade of Sewer Lift Station #4, located near the west of Holden Beach.

Bids for the upgrade were received on May 17th at 2:00 p.m. at Town Hall. The apparent low bidder is T.A. Loving Company and Green’s Engineering has determined the bid is complete and responsive and recommends the Town award the contract to T.A. Loving Company.

The bid and the project’s required direct purchase equipment identified by the engineer will exceed the programmed budget by $283,000, which will drive the need for a budget amendment to that effect. Ordinance 18-09, An Ordinance Amending Ordinance 17-08, The Revenues Appropriations Ordinance for Fiscal Year 2017 – 2018 (Amendment No. 4) is included for your consideration.

The attainment of a temporary construction easement from the adjacent property owner will be required to obtain the necessary access for construction and lay down of building materials. The Town Attorney has prepared and obtained same. The Town will need to execute the easement in order to move forward with the project.

RECOMMENDATION
It is suggested that if the Board desires to stay on schedule at this time – action to approve / award the contract to T.A.  Loving Company  in the amount  of $1,205,000,  in addition  to approving  the budget amendment and easement should be made by motion to approve award of the Lift Station #4 upgrade contract  to T.A. Loving Company in the amount  of $1,205,000, approve the associated easement agreement  for  Tax Parcel 245GA130 and  approve  Ordinance  18-09, An Ordinance  Amending Ordinance  17-08, The  Revenues and  Appropriations  Ordinance  for  Fiscal Year  2017 – 2018 (Amendment No.4) in the amount of$283,000.

 A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Total project cost went from $1,413,000 to $1,695,700 or a $282,700 difference. Contingency funds were reduced from $157,400 to $52,480 or a $104,920 difference. Usual and customary to start with 15% and reduce it to just 5% once you have a firm construction cost figure. Bottomline, the project cost just went up $387,620  or @27%. Yikes! Needless to say the Board was not happy, they had some concerns and asked questions for clarification. Mr. Green whose engineering firm is handling the project was present and addressed their issues.  

The abridged version is as follows:

  • Had a lot of interest originally but only received two bids
  • It’s a complex project, with a tight timeline, and seasonal limitations because of tourists
  • Limited number of contractors capable of doing this project
  • Engineer’s good faith cost estimates were over one year old
  • Significant escalation in prices since then

.     2. PUBLIC HEARING: System Development Fees Analysis – McGill Associates

Previously reported –
Public Water and Sewer System Development Fee Act
Audit Committee BOC’s Tasker Regarding House Bill 436

House Bill 436
Authority to impose fees has been modified
Necessitates us having to retool water and sewer fee rate schedule
Recommends it be prepared by licensed professional engineer
Town Manager plans to commission McGill and Associates to develop rate schedule

North Carolina General Assembly – House Bill 1730 / S.L. 2004-96
Enacted on 07/13/2004
Gives us the authority to charge the sewer treatment fee
For more information » click here

Holden Beach Sewer Treatment Fee
For more information » click here

A sewer capital fee of $497.30 per developable property within the corporate limits of the Town of Holden Beach is authorized for the payment of debt service to fulfill the Town’s sewer capital obligation. Said fee is to be billed concurrently with ad valorem property taxes and collected in accordance with applicable North Carolina General Statues.

The Town Budget Ordinance is where the actual assessment is made
That levy is contained in language on page 7 of Ordinance 17-08
For more information » click here

House Bill 436 / Public Water and Sewer System Development Fee Act
Enacted on 07/20/2017
Eliminates the authority to charge the fee
Town must comply not later than July 1,2018
For more information » click here

System Development Fees Report
Click here to view the System Development Fees Report prepared by McGill and Associates in accordance with HB 436. Written comments on the report may be sent to heather@hbtownhall.com. Comments will also be accepted by mail at Town of Holden Beach, Attn: Heather Finnell, 110 Rothschild Street, Holden Beach, NC 28462. The Board will schedule a public hearing prior to considering the adoption of the analysis. Information on the public hearing date will be provided when available.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY and PURPOSE STATEMENT

Executive Summary:
The North Carolina General Assembly passed House Bill 436 in July 2017, amending Chapter 162A of the General Statutes by adding “Article 8, System Development Fees.” This amendment was enacted as “An Act to Provide for Uniform Authority to Implement System Development Fees for Public Water and Sewer Systems in North Carolina and to Clarify the Applicable Statute of Limitations.” in HB436, which requires compliance with designated calculation methodology by July 1, 2018.

In response to the House Bill 436, the Town of Holden Beach retained McGill Associates to complete a system development fee analysis. Based on the Town of Holden Beach’s combination of existing system capacity and planned capital improvements to expand capacity, the development fee, in accordance with HB 436 rules for an Equivalent Residential Unit (ERU) for water and sewer was calculated to be $20,577. ERU is defined as the water and sewer capacities required to serve the most typical user type, which is a three-bedroom single-family dwelling.

The fee for other types of development can be calculated by applying the calculated cost of capacity per gallon of flow per day to the water and wastewater demands for various uses as defined by NC Administrative Code 15A NCAC 18C .0409 and 15A NCAC 02T .0114 using the following table:

Holden Beach System Development Fees: Cost per Gallon per Day Calculation
Item Cost-Justified System Fee Cost of Capacity ($ / gpd)

1 Water System $14.48 ($ / gpd)
2 Sewer System $41.07 ($ / gpd)

Update –
Dale Schepers, Management Services Analyst, made the presentation

Purpose Statement:
This report documents the results of the approach, methodology and calculations for establishing system development fees in accordance with North Carolina general statue 162A, Article 8 “System Development Fees”. Through House Bill 436 (HB 436), the General Assembly of North Carolina established a uniform approach and associated methodology required for local governmental units to calculate and implement System Development Fees (SDF) for public water and sewer systems. Existing SDF, in place on October 1, 2017, are required to be conformed to HB 436 no later than July 1, 2018.  The SDF must be determined by a qualified engineer or financial professional using industry standard practices.

The overall result of this effort   will be establishing the maximum cost-justified System Development Fees allowable under HB 436. Holden Beach may elect to implement fees of lesser value; however, any adjustment must be calculated on a cost per unit volume basis, meaning the same cost per gallon adjustment must be applied equally to all customers.

Conclusion:
McGill Associates has calculated costs for water and wastewater capacity on a per gallon per day basis for the Town of Holden Beach. This calculation was performed using the Combined Method to account for the Town’s combination of existing capacity and planned future capacity expansion through capital expenditure. This calculation resulted in a development fee of $20,577 for an Equivalent Residential Unit (ERU). ERU is defined as the water and sewer capacities required to serve the most typical user type, which is a three-bedroom single-family dwelling. The fee for other types of development can be calculated by applying the calculated the cost of capacity per gallon of flow per day to the water and wastewater demands for various uses as defined by NC Administrative Code 15A NCAC 18C .0409 and 15A NCAC 02T.0114.

Using NC Administrative Code 15A NCAC 18C .0409 and 15A NCAC 02T.0114 ensures that the same standard used to plan, design, construct and finance capital assets is applied as the same cost recovery basis to be applied to new development.

The Town may elect to charge less than the cost-justified System Development Fee documented in this report. Any adjustment must be calculated on a cost per unit volume basis, meaning the same cost per gallon adjustment must be applied equally to all customers.

Legislation House Bill 436 required a Public Hearing as one of the steps that must happen before the Town can move forward and implement the charges. HB436 is prescriptive, with precise instructions and the report given is in accordance with the legislation. The next steps are adoption of the study report and creating Ordinance that incorporates the recommended fees into a fee schedule. This process must be completed no later than July 1st. We are required to review the fee schedule and must reevaluate it in a maximum five-year timeframe.


Budget Message / Public Hearing
Notice is hereby given that the Budget proposed for the Fiscal Year, beginning July 1, 2018 and ending June 30, 2019, has been submitted to the Board of Commissioners. Click here to view the Budget Message.

A Public Hearing on the proposed Budget will be held by the Board of Commissioners at 9:00 a.m. or shortly thereafter on Wednesday, June 13, 2018 in the Holden Beach Town Hall Public Assembly, 110 Rothschild Street. Oral and written comments will be received at the hearing from any interested person.


The proposed budget sets forth four (4) main governmental funds – General, Water & Sewer, BPART and Canal Dredging. It also includes three (3) Capital Reserve Funds – Beach Nourishment, Water and Sewer. The Total Budget is twenty million four hundred and ten thousand and seven hundred and ninety-two dollars ($20,410,792).

 Proposed Budget by Fund
                                                         2016                           2017                          2018
General                                          $3,512,002               $3,369,711                $3,447,300

Water & Sewer                             $3,811,134               $5,140,804                $5,561,260
BPART                                            $6,666,220               $9,068,606                $5,887,335
Canal Dredging                            $1,696,440               $2,046,713                $2,551,479
Central Reach Project                 $14,552,040             /                                  /
Capital Reserve                            /                                 /                                  $3,430,452
Total All Funds                             $30,237,837            $19,625,834              $20,877,826


Budget Message is proposing a reduction in our tax rate of two (2) cents. Our current tax rate is $.220 per $100 of assessed value with the proposed tax rate of $.200. What does this mean to you? On a property with an assessed value of $500,000 we are talking about one hundred dollars ($100). Frankly that will have absolutely zero impact on a property owners socioeconomic position.

BOC’s just set a goal to increase the General Fund reserves as a priority item. The proposed budget achieves a minimum 40% of the Unassigned General Fund Ratio target range. We have high debt ratios combined with low reserve funds. So, let me get this straight, their solution is a reduction in the tax rate. The sensible approach to these long-term challenges would be to close the gap with this money instead of a token tax reduction. 


BOC’s SPECIAL MEETING / June 13, 2018    
1. PUBLIC HEARING: Proposed Budget for Fiscal Year 2018 – 2019
Town Manager briefly covered the Executive Summary section which describes what it does do

 2. Review and Possible Action as Related to the Budget Message
The discussion created a bit of rancor among the Board members. Ultimately, they decided to not include the proposed tax reduction. Instead they are putting the two hundred forty-one thousand six hundred and eighty-six dollars ($241,686) into Capital Reserve Fund or “sand” fund.

It doesn’t make any sense to me to reduce the tax rate now only to have to raise it in the foreseeable future. Not that long ago our taxes were raised in order to pay for beach nourishment. We now find ourselves with some surplus funds due to FEMA hurricane reimbursements. I support the Board’s decision to put the money into the Capital Reserve or “sand” fund.

 3. Discussion and Possible Action on the Audit Committee Recommendation of the Firm to Conduct an Internal Control Evaluation
They selected the firm RSM from Morehead City for the internal control review
Recommendation is to obtain firm with a not to exceed price of $20,000
Scope of work subject to approval from The N.C. Local Government Commission

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Previously reported –  April 2017
Direct Solicitation for External Audit
The North Carolina Local Government Commission requires the Town to have an annual audit performed. The Town has used Thompson, Price, Scott, Adams and Co. since 2012 to perform this service. Approval of the contract means that Thompson, Price, Scott, Adams & Co has been selected for their sixth consecutive year, with no cost increase, to handle our audit for fiscal year that ends June 30th, 2017. Protocol is to change firms every few years, traditionally we have done that after vendor has audited us for three years. Annual audit vendor usually selected, and contract signed in February.

Direct Solicitation to Conduct Comprehensive Internal Control Review
he Audit Report with respect to the Town’s Annual Financial Statements for the year ended June 30, 2017 raised two “significant deficiencies” with respect to the Town’s financial controls and procedures for financial statement preparation. The Audit Report also concluded that any financial reports provided to the Commissioners cannot be relied on, as the ledger does not reflect adjustments made in previous years. The Audit Committee has had preliminary discussions with the Auditor about these matters and the audit process, and as part of that discussion the Auditor recommended that the Town engage a consultant to perform a comprehensive review of its internal financial controls. The Audit report approved and signed by the Town’s Finance Director included a corrective response stating, “The Town of Holden Beach’s governing body feels that there are limited financial resources at this time for training the finance department staff in GAAP and that it is not cost beneficial to obtain additional assistance in this area.” This statement was false. Accordingly, I move that:

The Audit Committee is authorized and directed to review, investigate, report and make recommendations to the BOC on
(i)            the Town’s accounting and financial control systems including “significant deficiencies” related to internal controls;

(ii)           appropriate training of financial and accounting staff;

(iii)          policies and procedures relating to financial statement preparation, preventive and detective internal controls, and the audit process, including engaging such consultants to perform such internal controls review as the Audit Committee deems necessary or appropriate.

Handout – Statement of Work
“The Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach, via their Audit Committee, is soliciting proposals to perform a review of the Town’s internal controls.

The scope of this work will include a review and assessment of current practices in the operations of the finance department, including the preparation of financial statements that are compliant with generally accepted accounting principles, and the development of financial reports provided to the Board of Commissioners.  In addition, the work should include a focus on the controls designed to prevent or detect misappropriations, embezzlement, and any other potential fraudulent activities.

The deliverables from the work should include an assessment of the effectiveness of existing controls as well as their implementation, recommended changes to work practices, policies and procedures to ensure accurate financial reporting, and to prevent certain events from occurring, as well as backup procedures to ensure the proposed internal controls function as intended.

The work should comply with the Local Government Budget and Fiscal Control Act and align with the principles in the COSO Internal Control Integrated Framework. ”

Previously reported –
Finding: 17-1 / SIGNIFICANT DEFICIENCY
Inadequate Design of Internal Controls over the Preparation of the Financial Statements
Finding: 17-2 / SIGNIFICANT DEFICIENCY
Prior Period Adjustment ($479,789)

4. Discussion and Possible Action on the Audit Committee Recommendation of the Firm to Conduct the 2017 – 2018 Annual Audit
The Audit Committee selected the firm Rives & Associates as the auditor

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

 5. Executive Session Pursuant to North Carolina General Statute 143-318.11(a)(3) to Consider the Performance of an Employee


Hurricane Season –

Hurricane #1 - CR

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) defines a hurricane as “an intense tropical weather system with a well-defined circulation and maximum sustained winds of 74 mph (64 knots) or higher.”

Be prepared – have a plan!

For assistance with making an emergency plan read more here »
. 1) FEMA Ready
. 2) American Red Cross Disaster and Safety Library
. 3) ReadyNC
. 4) Town Emergency Information
. 5) HBPOIN Hurricane Emergency Plan

THB – EVACUATION, CURFEW & VEHICLE DECALS
For more information » click here

If the Town declares a mandatory evacuation, PLEASE LEAVE
General Assembly during the 2012 Session, specifically authorizes both voluntary and mandatory evacuations, and increases the penalty for violating any local emergency restriction or prohibition from a Class 3 to a Class 2 misdemeanor.  Given the broad authority granted to the governor and city and county officials under the North Carolina Emergency Management Act (G.S. Chapter 166A) to take measures necessary to protect public health, safety, and welfare during a disaster, it is reasonable to interpret the authority to “direct and compel” evacuations to mean ordering “mandatory” evacuations. Those who choose to not comply with official warnings to get out of harm’s way, or are unable to, should prepare themselves to be fully self-sufficient for the first 72 hours after the storm. 

A repeat of 2017′: Experts predict another destructive hurricane season
A scientist with Global Weather Oscillations is predicting the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season to be “somewhat of a repeat of 2017,” claiming this year will bring more devastating storms. According to GWO, a storm prediction company, this year’s Atlantic hurricane season may be just as destructive — or even more destructive — than the 2017 season, which ended with 17 named storms and 6 major hurricanes. In 2017, GWO predicted 16 named storms, eight hurricanes and four major hurricanes. Professor David Dilley, senior research and prediction scientist for GWO, predicts that 2018 will be “somewhat of a repeat of 2017,” but some hurricane landfalls will occur in different locations this year. Dilley anticipates 16 named storms, eight hurricanes and four major hurricanes. He also predicts four of the hurricanes have potential for U.S. landfall — with two likely being “major impact storms.” “Some United States zones and the Caribbean Islands are currently in their strongest hurricane landfall cycle in 40 to 70-years,” Dilley said in a statement. Dilley says the reason for another disastrous hurricane season has to do with ocean water temperatures. He explains how the temperatures continue to run warmer than normal across most of the Atlantic, especially in the Caribbean region and the Atlantic near the U.S. “This is very similar to the ocean temperatures of last year, and this will again be conducive for tropical storms and/or hurricanes forming and/or strengthening near the Lesser Antilles and close to the United States,” he added.
Read more » click here

Hurricane Season’s Around the Corner. Here’s What to Expect.
This year’s hurricane season should be normal or slightly more active than average, government forecasters said on Thursday. After the exceptionally destructive season last year, the prediction might seem like a reprieve of sorts. But a season with few storms can do tremendous damage if a single storm makes landfall. Hurricane season runs from June 1 until Nov. 1 and peaks from mid-August through late October. “We’re not expecting the season to be one of the most active on record,” said Gerry Bell, lead hurricane season forecaster with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Climate Prediction Center. But, he said, “It’s time to start getting prepared.”
Read more » click here

NOAA predicts 10-16 named storms for the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season
This year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is predicting an average number of major storms

Last year’s Atlantic hurricane season saw plenty of named storms and several destructive ones. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) this year’s season is predicted to be near or above-normal with 10-16 named storms.

“NOAA’s forecasters predict a 70 percent likelihood of 10 to 16 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which 5 to 9 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including 1 to 4 major hurricanes (category 3, 4 or 5; with winds of 111 mph or higher). An average hurricane season produces 12 named storms, of which 6 become hurricanes, including 3 major hurricanes,” according to a NOAA press release.

The 2018 Atlantic hurricane season is driven by several factors, including El Niño and sea-surface temperatures.

“With the advances made in hardware and computing over the course of the last year, the ability of NOAA scientists to both predict the path of storms and warn Americans who may find themselves in harm’s way is unprecedented,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “The devastating hurricane season of 2017 demonstrated the necessity for prompt and accurate hurricane forecasts,” according to the release.
Read more » click here

Forecasters predict a near- or above-normal 2018 Atlantic hurricane season
NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center is forecasting a 75-percent chance that the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season will be near- or above-normal.

Forecasters predict a 35 percent chance of an above-normal season, a 40 percent chance of a near-normal season, and a 25 percent chance of a below-normal season for the upcoming hurricane season, which extends from June 1 to November 30.

 “With the advances made in hardware and computing over the course of the last year, the ability of NOAA scientists to both predict the path of storms and warn Americans who may find themselves in harm’s way is unprecedented,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “The devastating hurricane season of 2017 demonstrated the necessity for prompt and accurate hurricane forecasts.”

NOAA’s forecasters predict a 70-percent likelihood of 10 to 16 named storms (winds of 39 mph or higher), of which 5 to 9 could become hurricanes (winds of 74 mph or higher), including 1 to 4 major hurricanes (category 3, 4 or 5; with winds of 111 mph or higher). An average hurricane season produces 12 named storms, of which 6 become hurricanes, including 3 major hurricanes. 

 The possibility of a weak El Nino developing, along with near-average sea surface temperatures across the tropical Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, are two of the factors driving this outlook. These factors are set upon a backdrop of atmospheric and oceanic conditions that are conducive to hurricane development and have been producing stronger Atlantic hurricane seasons since 1995.

“NOAA’s observational and modeling enhancements for the 2018 season put us on the path to deliver the world’s best regional and global weather models,” said Neil Jacobs, Ph.D., assistant secretary of commerce for environmental observation and prediction. “These upgrades are key to improving hurricane track and intensity forecasts, allowing NOAA to deliver the best science and service to the nation.”

 NOAA’s suite of sophisticated technologies – from next-generation models and satellite data to new and improved forecast and graphical products – enable decision makers and the general public to take action before, during, and after hurricanes, helping to build a more “Weather-Ready Nation.”

“Preparing ahead of a disaster is the responsibility of all levels of government, the private sector and the public,” said acting FEMA Deputy Administrator Daniel Kaniewski. “It only takes one storm to devastate a community so now is the time to prepare. Do you have adequate insurance, including flood insurance? Does your family have a communication and evacuation plan? Stay tuned to your local news and download the FEMA app to get alerts, and make sure you heed any warnings issued by local officials.”

NOAA will update the 2018 Atlantic seasonal outlook in early August, just prior to the peak of the season.
Read more » click here

NOAA promotes preparedness as 2018 hurricane season begins June 1
A named storm formed before the beginning of the hurricane season for a fourth consecutive year.

Subtropical Storm Alberto made landfall near Laguna Beach, according to the NWS National Hurricane Center in Miami. By Tuesday afternoon it was downgraded to a subtropical depression as it moved through central Alabama.

This year’s Atlantic hurricane season isn’t expected to be as active as last year’s, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. “We do not expect an extremely active (hurricane season) like last year,” Dr. Jerry Bell, NOAA’s lead seasonal hurricane forecaster, said during a May 24 news conference. “But an active season means a lot of storms could form in the Atlantic (Ocean).” An average season produces 12 named storms, with six becoming hurricanes, including three major hurricanes.

Regardless of the prediction, the Atlantic region needs to prepare for hurricane season. A hurricane can strike in any season, whether it is active like in 2017 or not,” he said. Bell said while they can make predictions of hurricane activity, they can’t predict where hurricanes will land — and they don’t just impact coastal communities. About 80 million people between the Atlantic coast and the Gulf of Mexico coastline face the threat of hurricanes, with inland flooding causing significant damage in recent years. “While we can’t prevent hurricanes, we can take action to better prevent their impact on communities,” Neil Jacobs, Ph.D., assistant secretary of commerce for environmental observation and prediction, said during the forecast presentation. Throughout the presentation, speakers emphasized residents in the Atlantic hurricane coverage area should prepare every year as if they will be impacted by a tropical storm or hurricane. “Prepare now, before hurricane season by making emergency and evacuation plans for your families” so family members know how to react even if they might not be together when a disaster strikes, Jacobs said. Jacobs added while technology allows the NOAA to project a narrower tracking cone for a hurricane’s projected path each year, the hazards caused by wind and water create dangerous circumstances outside the cone, too.
Read more » click here

No matter what a storm outlook is for a given year,

vigilance and preparedness is urged.


HBPOIN – Lou’s Views
.          • Gather and disseminate information
.          • Identify the issues and determine how they affect you
.          • Act as a watchdog
.          • Grass roots monthly newsletter since 2008

https://lousviews.com/

06 – News & Views

Lou’s Views
News & Views / June Edition

Calendar of Events –


Riverfest Celebration Conway Riverfest - CR
June 30th
Conway, SC


Held along the Waccamaw River in downtown Conway the festival
celebrates Independence Day with music and events for the entire family.
For more information » click here


4th of July Southport - CR 190
N.C. 4th of July Festival
,
July 2nd – 4th
Southport


The patriotic spirit of America is alive and well in the City of Southport. For over 200 years this small maritime community has celebrated our nation’s independence in a big way. Incorporated as the N.C. 4th of July Festival in 1972 the festival committee strives to keep the focus of the festival on honoring our nation’s birthday with a little fun thrown in.

For more information » click here



Battleship Blast 4th of July Celebration
July 4th
Wilmington

.

Annual 4th of July celebration at Riverfront Park in downtown Wilmington. Featured entertainment will perform from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM, followed by fireworks at 9:05 PM launched from a barge in the Cape Fear River adjacent to the USS North Carolina Battleship. The only place you need to be this holiday is downtown Wilmington for the best view of fireworks.
For more information » click here


Events
TDA - logo
Discover a wide range of things to do in the Brunswick Islands for an experience that goes beyond the beach.
For more information » click here


Calendar of Events – Island


Concerts on the Coast Series
Live performances featuring local musical groups are held at the pavilion on Sunday evenings from late May to early September. The concerts are free of charge. Popcorn sold at the concerts is used to support the concerts and fund beautification projects in the area.
.
For more information
»
click here


Shirt - CR

Tide Dyed Program
This event is located at the Holden Beach Pavilion. Tie dye your own shirts; the cost is just $5 per shirt. It takes place at 2:00 p.m. every Tuesday during the summer.

 


Turtle - Loggerheads CR

Turtle Talk
Two programs both are held every Wednesday during the summer at Town Hall. Children’s Turtle Time is at 4:00 p.m. with crafts, stories and activities for children ages 3 – 6. All children must be accompanied by an adult. Turtle Talk is an educational program at 7:00 p.m. for everyone else.


Camp Kids Playing

Summer Day Camp Program
Day Camp is on Thursday during the summer beginning June 14th and is open to children ages 6 – 12. Kids can join us this summer for a variety of fun activities. Click here to view our Camp Schedule with each week’s activity and cost. Space is limited, you must pre-register. Completed registration forms must be mailed in with payment or dropped off with payment to Town Hall. Payment is non-refundable.


Parks & Recreation / Programs & Events
For more information » click here


Reminders –

Ribbon Cutting Bridgeview Park
The Town invites you to join them at the ribbon cutting ceremony on Tuesday, July 10th at 1:00 p.m. at Bridgeview Park. There will be a short ceremony followed by snacks and music.



BOC’s Meeting
The Board of Commissioners’ June Regular Meeting is scheduled on the second Tuesday of the month, July 10th

 


Speed Limit
Please take notice – Speed limit seasonal limitations, in accordance with Town Ordinances.Speed limit will change on OBW from 45mph to 35mph west of the general store. This change took place on April 1st and be in effect through September 30th .



Trash Can Requirements –
Rental Properties


Waste Industries – trash can requirements / Ordinance 07-13, Section 50.10
Rental properties have specific number of trash cans based on number of bedrooms.
. a.
One extra trash can per every two bedrooms
§50.08 RENTAL HOMES.

(A) Rental homes, as defined in Chapter 157, that are rented as part of the summer rental season, are subject to high numbers of guests, resulting in abnormally large volumes of trash. This type of occupancy use presents a significantly higher impact than homes not used for summer rentals. In interest of public health and sanitation and environmental concerns, all rental home shall have a minimum of one trash can per two bedrooms. Homes with an odd number of bedrooms shall round up (for examples one to two bedrooms – one trash can; three to four bedrooms – two trash cans; five – six bedrooms – three trash cans, and the like).

Solid Waste Pick-Up Schedule
Waste Industries change in service, trash pickup will be twice a week
Starting the Saturday before Memorial Day through the Saturday after Labor Day:

Pick-up is every Tuesday and Saturday from May 26th through September 8th

Please note:

  • Trash carts must be at the street by 6:00 a.m. on the pickup day.
  • Carts on OCEAN BOULEVARD ONLY will be rolled back to the front of the house.
  • BAG the trash before putting it in the cart.

 


Golf Carts

 

 

Golf carts are treated the same as other automotive vehicles
Town ordinances state no parking anytime on OBW
Therefore golf carts are illegally parked when left by any beach access point


 

Pets on the Beach Strand

 

.
.

Pets – Chapter 90 / Animals / 90.20
From May 20th through September 9th
It is unlawful to have any pet on the beach strand
. a. D
uring the hours of 9:00am through 5:00pm

Here are the beaches where your dog is welcome, and not welcome
Different beach towns have different rules, but all require dogs to be leashed. While some beaches allow dogs on the beach all the time, others strictly forbid them. All beaches require pet owners to clean up any waste from pets.
Read more » click here


 


A Second Helping

 


.
.
Program to collect food Saturday mornings during the summer
. 1.
Fourteenth year of the program
. 2.
Food collections have now totaled over 213,000 pounds
. 3. C
ollections will begin on June 9th
. 4. Food is distributed to the needy in Brunswick County
For more information » click here

They have moved –
Drop-off site has moved to the Beach Mart parking lot on the Causeway.



Bird Nesting Area

NC Wildlife Commission has posted signs that say – Bird Nesting Area / Please don’t disturb. The signs are posted on the west end beach strand around 1339 OBW.


People and dogs are supposed to stay out of the area from April through November

. 1) It’s a Plover nesting area
. 2) Allows migrating birds a place to land and rest without being disturbed


Building Numbers
Ocean front homes are required to have house numbers visible from the beach strand.
Please call Planning and Inspections Department at 910.842.6080 with any questions.

§157.087 BUILDING NUMBERS.

(A) The correct street number shall be clearly visible from the street on all buildings. Numbers shall be block letters, not script, and of a color clearly in contrast with that of the building and shall be a minimum of six inches in height.
(B) Beach front buildings will also have clearly visible house numbers from the strand side meeting the above criteria on size, contrast, etc. Placement shall be on vertical column supporting deck(s) or deck roof on the primary structure. For buildings with a setback of over 300 feet from the first dune line, a vertical post shall be erected aside the walkway with house numbers affixed. In all cases the numbers must be clearly visible from the strand. Other placements may be acceptable with approval of the Building Inspector.


 

Mosquito Control

.


Current EPA protocol is that spraying is complaint driven

The Town is unable to just spray as they had in the past
. 1)
Complaint based
. 2)
Citizen request
. 3)
Proactively monitor hot spots

They recommend that you get rid of any standing water on your property that you can
Urged everyone to call Town Hall if they have mosquito issues so that they can spray

Spraying is complaint based, so keep the calls coming!


It is time to ‘fight the bite’
Now that it seems spring is finally here to stay; state health officials advise us to “Fight the Bite” by taking measures to reduce the risk of tick and mosquito bites. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the number of vector-borne diseases, or those transmitted though the bites of blood-feeding ticks, mosquitoes and fleas, has more than tripled across the country. While April is Tick and Mosquito Awareness Month in North Carolina, the danger of contracting a serious illness like Lyme disease, West Nile or Zika viruses, exists all year, especially in warmer climates like ours here in Brunswick County.

To reduce exposure to tick and mosquito bites:

  • Avoid tick habitats, such as wooded, grassy or brushy areas.
  • Use tick and mosquito repellent that contains DEET (or equivalent) on exposed skin and wear permethrin-treated clothing. Use caution when applying to children.
  • Reduce tick habitats with selective landscaping techniques, like putting a three-foot wide barrier of wood chips or gravel between lawns, wooded areas, patios and playground equipment
  • Install or repair screens on windows and doors and use air conditioning if possible.
  • “Tip and toss” to reduce mosquito breeding by emptying standing water from flowerpots, gutters, buckets, pool covers, pet water dishes, discarded tires and birdbaths at least once a week.
    Read more » click here

Volunteers needed
The Town is always looking for people to volunteer for their various boards and committees. If you are interested in serving, please fill out a resume form and submit it to heather@hbtownhall.com.


Recycling-Bin
Curbside recycling
Waste Industries is now offering curbside recycling for Town properties that desire to participate in the service. The service cost is $54.00 annually paid in advance to the Town of Holden Beach and consists of a ninety-six (96) gallon cart that is emptied every other week.
Curbside Recycling Application » click here
Curbside Recycling Calendar » click here


Elevator - CRElevators
Most states mandate that elevator systems be tested and inspected annually
. Currently the state of North Carolina does not require annual inspections to be performed on all elevator systems. The use of unsafe and defective lifting devices imposes a substantial probability of serious and preventable injury to your family and guests. It is in the owner’s best interest to minimize injuries and liability by scheduling an annual safety inspection to ensure the safe operation of their elevator system.

Safety Notice –
Waupaca Elevator Company has issued an important safety notice. The potential hazard is associated with normal wear in your elevator. If your elevator develops the problem and it is not repaired, the elevator may drop unexpectedly with you in it and you may be injured. They recommend you contact your elevator service company.


Library
If you need something to keep you busy in this colder weather, make sure to visit the island library. The library is in the upstairs of Holden Beach Town Hall. All the books were donated. Patrons of the library don’t have to check out a book; they are on the honor system to return it.



Neighborhood Watch –

Need to look out for each other
Call 911 if you see or hear anything suspicious
Fill out Keep Check Request Form if you will be out of town
• Submit completed Property Registration Form
• Pickup copy of Protecting Your Home


Upon Further Review –


Seismic Testing / Offshore Drilling
Previously reported – September 2015
Resolution 15-09 is in opposition to offshore exploration and drilling. Why? Because we have a tourism based economy, along with the local fishing industry and quality of life depends on the health and welfare of our natural resources. We believe that the inherent risks to our region from offshore exploration and drilling have the potential to irrevocably harm our natural environment, our economic well-being and our overall quality of life. Including us there are now 79 municipalities that have passed resolutions opposing offshore exploration and drilling.

Previously reported – January 2018

Trump Moves to Open Nearly All Offshore Waters to Drilling
Read more » click here

Cooper: NC to sue if kept in offshore drilling plan
Governor threatens legal action if Trump administration pushes plan to open coast to oil exploration. “No way. Not off our coast,” Cooper said of oil exploration.
Read more » click here

Resolution against offshore drilling stalls in Brunswick
In a 4-1 vote, Brunswick County Commissioners voted to remove a resolution against offshore drilling from their meeting agenda Monday night.
Read more » click here

Update –
Zinke sees low demand, strong opposition, for new offshore drilling
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke acknowledged Friday that President Trump’s plan to open large swaths of the East and West coasts to offshore oil and natural gas drilling faces significant headwinds. Speaking to an offshore wind conference in New Jersey, Zinke said drilling companies are not that interested in new areas offshore, while there’s “strong opposition” in most of the neighboring states. The acknowledgements could be a sign that Zinke will significantly narrow his plan, released in January, for offshore drilling. Under the plan, the entire Gulf of Mexico, Pacific and Atlantic coasts and areas around Alaska would be open to drilling.
Read more » click here

Why New Jersey is leading the resistance to Trump’s offshore drilling plan
The Trump administration’s bid to expand offshore drilling sounds like a sweet deal when the oil and gas industry sells it: more jobs, increased local revenue and possibly an energy surplus that could lower home heating costs. But Mayor John Moor’s opinion of the proposal to drill off the Atlantic Coast for the first time in decades is set: “I don’t think the risk is worth all the money in the world,” he said at City Hall, a few blocks from the popular beach boardwalk that is fueling his city’s economic turnaround.
Read more » click here


North Carolina Gov. Cooper joins others in protest of federal fines for opposing offshore drilling
North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper has joined four other Atlantic coast governors to oppose the Enhancing State Management of Federal Lands and Waters Act, a proposal that could cost the state millions if it bans offshore drilling for oil and gas. Last Thursday, Cooper and governors from Connecticut, Rhode Island, New Jersey and Virginia called on Congress to reject the act, which would impose a tax on states that want to exempt more than half of federal lands from oil and gas leases.

Initial calculations estimate North Carolina could have to pay more than $500-million to receive a drilling waiver. “North Carolina should not have to pay a ransom to protect our beaches from the dangers of offshore drilling,” Cooper said in a prepared statement. “Our coastal communities generate more than 30,000 jobs and the risk posed by offshore drilling simply isn’t worth it.”

In a reversal of previous policy, the Trump administration has opened most of the Atlantic coast for potential leases. Cooper previously expressed opposition to seismic air gun tests and drilling. In January, he formally requested that North Carolina be exempt from leasing, a status already granted to Florida. Dozens of beach communities have passed resolutions against offshore drilling. Brunswick County’s governing board is now officially neutral on the issue, after earlier passing a resolution in support of drilling.
Read more » click here


Previously reported –
Holden Beach Newsletter
Chemours has issued a press release announcing that the company will take measures to eliminate byproduct GenX wastewater emissions from its Fayetteville site. Click here to view the release.

In order to keep citizens informed, Brunswick County has established a website to share information about GenX as they learn it. You can find this page at www.brunswickcountync.gov/genx. The website contains a FAQ section that they update as they learn additional information (or receive additional questions), links to all their press releases and links to other resources like information from NCDEQ. There is also a link where citizens can go to sign up to receive email updates on the topic.


The Public Information Officer for Brunswick County announced that the County has taken legal action against DuPont and Chemours for contaminating the Cape Fear River.

10.31.2017
Statement from Brunswick County
The filing of formal legal action against Chemours and DuPont represents another crucial step in protecting our public drinking water supply. It sends a clear message that Brunswick County will simply not stand for the discharge of emerging or unregulated chemicals into our public drinking water supply. Let us be clear…we will ensure that any company that threatens this vital resource is held responsible. Furthermore, our litigation team is consulting the nation’s leading experts to determine the best long-term water testing and treatment methods for the entire county. As part of that, we will ensure that the costs for doing so do not fall upon the rate payers, but upon those dumping the unregulated chemicals in the water.
For more information » click here

Wilmington officials ask NC to shut down GenX production
County officials are asking that the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) shut down operations that result in the production of chemicals like GenX, which have been discharged into the Cape Fear River and discovered in Wilmington-area drinking water systems.
Read more » click here

EPA to set GenX toxicity value
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will develop a toxicity value for the potential carcinogen GenX and related compounds, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt announced at a national leadership summit in Washington Tuesday.
Read more » click here

Update –
NC tells Chemours to keep GenX out of air, groundwater
DEQ filed proposed court order Monday that would require Chemours to reduce air emissions and address contamination caused by GenX around the Fayetteville Works facility
Read more » click here


Anticipation for a safe, successful summer coming to newly dredged inlet
Over the last few summers, many boaters in Holden Beach or Oak Island stayed away from it. Now the Lockwood Folly Inlet has been dredged and we went to see how smooth sailing will be entering the summer. The inlet has for centuries been a part of nautical traffic. Those with the inlet association tell WWAY’s Andrew James that they almost lost it. Now it’s reportedly in the safest shape sailors have seen in years. For the last few summers Captain Cane Faircloth has not looked forward to the voyage. “We’d actually have to get going really fast and skip across the sandbar to navigate and get through it, which was super dangerous but it was the only choice that we had,” said the Captain who is also a founding member of the Lockwood Folly Association. That’s all because sand erosion was causing a built up shoaling at the mouth of the Lockwood Folly Inlet. Faircloth says, at low tide, it could be as shallow as 4 feet. For the past two seasons in Captain Faircloth’s business, Ollie Raja Charters, had to take visitors through the Shallotte River inlet or through the Cape Fear river. That after he and a group of boaters and shrimpers took a stand in 2016. “At the point when it all came together, the core of engineers told us we almost lost the inlet it was almost completely gone,” Faircloth said. They weathered the storm and the dredging came to remove the sand. The Army Core of Engineers completed it this past winter. Now the inlet is nearly double the depth at low tide as it was before. “Personally I would say the traffic has quadrupled on it since last year,” Faircloth said. It’s that kind of traffic Faircloth claims to also bring a boost to business in the way of fuel or equipment sales. Needless to say, it may not be the smoothest sailing as our Andrew James found out, but Faircloth says it certainly will be safer sailing. What we’re coming to learn is that the inlet is in the best shape it’s been in the last ten years.” Faircloth says they are still hoping the Coast Guard will put out more navigational beacons, buoys. right now two sit at the inlet’s mouth but eight have been ordered.
Read more » click here


Corrections & Amplifications –

Pointe West – Storm Water Project
Unintended consequence – it became a kiddie pool for an alligator


Dune Stabilization Project

Previously reported – February 2018
Vegetation for West of Central Reach Project Area
The Town’s contractor for sand fence and vegetation, Coastal Transplants, conducted an assessment for the area west of the Central Reach Project. It has been determined that the area from 800 OBW to just past 1000 OBW (approximately 5400 feet) can be best served by adding plants to foster dune growth and stabilization. The contractor estimates that to properly cover the area 63,500 plants will be needed. The quote on the project is $79,375.00 with the work beginning June 1st
.

 Beach Strand Dune Stabilization
West end of the island is a low priority and is not considered part of our engineered beach. Therefore, federal grant funds can’t be utilized for that part of the beach strand. The Town has not planned on or budgeted for sand fencing and vegetation there. The area is not included in the grant. Last year at the April Town Budget Workshop, the BOC’s agreed to spend $50,000 for vegetation west of the Central Reach Project. The Town Manager had indicated that work west of the Central Reach Project will take place after the hurricane season. In February of this year the Board passed a budget amendment in the amount of $29,375 that would be necessary to appropriate adequate funding. Commissioner Freer instructed the Town to clarify with the vendor Coastal Transplants that just past 1000 OBW will be inclusive of all the properties through 1057 OBW. This year at April meeting Town Manager informed us that beach grass planting west of the Central Reach Project will begin after Memorial Day.

Update –
The project appears to be completed inclusive of all the properties through 1057 OBW

Thank You!


Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM)

Previously reported –
The preliminary maps were published in August 2014

TOWN WEBSITE –
The Town has received approval from FEMA for revisions to the Holden Beach Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM). These map revisions will be effective August 28, 2018 once the Town formally updates our local ordinances. The Town staff is working on an implementation schedule and anticipates being able to use the new maps for construction in late May. These maps may be viewed at www.ncfloodmaps.com.

Breaking News –
I spoke with my insurance agent regarding the protocols for getting a policy rate reduction based on revisions to the Flood Insurance Rate Map. Unfortunately, you can’t get a reduction in your flood insurance rates until the new maps become effective at the end of August. After the August 28th effective date, on your policy renewal date, adjustments will be made retroactively if applicable.

FEMA has new floodplain maps.
Here are the changes expected in Southeastern NC
The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has released new floodplain maps, and soon, buildings will be rezoned to new designations for the first time in 12 years. This will result in policy changes for thousands of residents in the coastal and riparian floodplain. As the National Flood Insurance Program gets continually re-authorized and extended, FEMA has given municipalities until August 28 to comply with updated Flood Insurance Rate Map changes and regulations.
Read more » click here


Odds & Ends

NC Department of Insurance press release
The North Carolina (NC) Rate Bureau in November 2017 proposed a significant rate increase for homeowner insurance rates across the State. On January 5, 2018, the NC Department of Insurance issued a press release announcing the NC Insurance Commissioner’s response to the request.

Insurance Commissioner Causey rejects proposed Homeowners Insurance rate increase: Sets Hearing Date
Read the press release » click here

Homeowners insurance to increase by 5.5 percent on the coast
Following months of negotiation, the N.C. Department of Insurance and the N.C. Rate Bureau have settled on an average statewide increase in homeowners insurance of 4.8 percent. In costal counties, that increase was capped at 5.5 percent.
Read more » click here

Insurance Commissioner settles homeowners’ insurance rate dispute
Insurance Commissioner Mike Causey announced today the N.C. Department of Insurance has ended the legal dispute with the North Carolina Rate Bureau on its proposal for an 18.7 percent homeowners’ insurance rate increase. Commissioner Causey has negotiated an almost 14 percent lower rate for an average 4.8 percent increase statewide. “I have negotiated a rate that will have minimal impact on the coast yet keep the state’s insurance companies financially sound,” said Commissioner Causey. The 4.8 percent increase will vary according to territory with a cap of 5.5 percent statewide instead of the 25 percent bump on the coast initially proposed by the NCRB. The agreement also covers insurance for tenants and condominiums, which is capped at 12 percent. This rate settlement will save consumers approximately $293 million in the first year alone, compared to the NCRB’s proposed increase.

The NCRB is separate from the NCDOI and is made up of insurance industry representatives. The Rate Bureau filed for the proposed 18.7 percent rate increase November 17, 2017, claiming the increase was necessary because of the increased costs stemming from tornado, severe thunderstorm, and windstorm/hail damage. Commissioner Causey had concerns over the initial filing and set a July 23, 2018, hearing date for the case to be decided if an agreement couldn’t be reached. Over the last several months, the Department and the NCRB have been in litigation while trying to settle the case without the necessity of a long, expensive hearing. The last time homeowners saw an insurance rate increase was in 2012. At that time, the NCRB case was settled for an average statewide increase of 7 percent. The increase will take effect October 1, 2018.
Read more » click here


This & That

New Visitor Map
Click here
 to check out the Town’s new Visitor Map. The map features public accessways, parking, handicap parking, restrooms/ port-a-johns, showers, handicap accesses and parks.


Here’s how to stay safe from rip currents this summer
Rip currents prove to be a threat to beach goers on North Carolina’s coast every summer, and this year is no exception. In 2017, there were 12 rip current-related fatalities in North Carolina, according to the National Weather Service. Two were in Carolina Beach, one was in Holden Beach and another was in Wrightsville Beach. This year, three people drowned in rip currents in North Carolina in the first full week of June alone.
Read more » click here


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SUV found submerged, driver declines hospital treatment after Holden Beach accident
.
.
.
.
An accident in Holden Beach left an SUV submerged in the water on Thursday night, according to a spokesperson for the Coastline Rescue Squad. At around 8 p.m., emergency crews responded to 99 Southshore Drive at the NC Wildlife ramp for a call of a submerged vehicle and a person down on the ground. Upon arrival, first responders found a Cadillac Escalade fully submerged. The spokesperson said the driver may have experienced a medical emergency and fell out of the vehicle while trying to drive the SUV and an attached trailer up the ramp. Treatment was administered on the scene and the driver declined to be transferred to the hospital.  Holden Beach police are investigating the incident. Coastline, Brunswick County EMS and the Tri-Beach Police Department all responded.
Read more » click here


 

.             Big Earl


..

.

Shrimp boat still beached in Holden Beach
‘Big Earl’ washed ashore Thursday, and efforts to refloat the 60-year-old vessel have been unsuccessful so far.
Read more » click here

Stuck shrimp boat on Holden Beach finally back in the ocean
A shrimp boat that called the Holden Beach shoreline home for the past week is free. With the help of an excavator and high tide, Big Earl was dislodged from the beach Thursday morning and slowly made its way out into the ocean. The boat became stuck on the shoreline last Thursday during its first trip out. Over the course of the following week, residents, tourists, and visitors all came together to try and help the owner get Big Earl back into the ocean but had little success. Michael Staley of Greensboro spearheaded the efforts and rented an excavator to help dig out the vessel. Everyone cheered as Big Earl made its way back into the ocean and said it was a miracle when it left. The Coast Guard had set a deadline of Friday morning for Big Earl to be removed before they would take steps to remove fluids and any other hazardous materials from the boat, at the owner’s expense.
Read more » click here

‘Big Earl’ pushed and pulled back out to sea
The shrimping boat had spent the past week beached on Holden Beach
Big Earl had been beached on the Holden Beach strand for a week after shrimping nets tangled in the boat’s propeller, causing it to come too close to shore. Waves pushed the 20-ton boat ashore, and members of the Holden Beach community rallied around the boat’s owner and captain until the boat was finally pulled to freedom Thursday.
Read more » click here



Sea Turtles Use Magnetic Fields
to Find Their Birthplace Beach


.

Sea turtles use the earth’s magnetic fields to navigate back to the area where they were born decades earlier, according to a new study that used loggerhead genetics to investigate their travels. After swimming for years in a giant loop from nesting grounds in North Carolina and Florida to North Africa, the turtles find their way back to nest on beaches within about 40 to 50 miles of where they were born. The new study suggests that the turtles learned their home beach’s distinctive magnetic signature, through what is called geomagnetic imprinting.
Read more » click here

 

Turtle Watch Program – 2018

. 1) Current nest count – thirteen (13) as of 06/22/18
. • I
n 2017 nest count was twenty-one (21)
. • Average annual number of nests is 39.5
. 2)
First nest of the season was on May 20th


.

Members of the patrol started riding the beach every morning on May 1 and will do so through October looking for signs of turtle nests.
For more information » click here

Turtle Talks hatch for another season
The Holden Beach Turtle Patrol’s first Turtle Talk of the summer will be June 6. Turtle Talk will begin at 7 p.m. at Holden Beach Town Hall at 110 Rothschild St. on Holden Beach. The doors open at 6:30 p.m. and seating is limited.

This free weekly educational program will be conducted each Wednesday evening in June, July and August, including July 4. The program shares information about the Turtle Patrol, the sea turtles and how vacationers and residents can help the sea turtles that nest on Holden Beach.

Several turtle artifacts will be on display and educational materials available. The 45-minute presentation includes a short video about the lifecycle of the sea turtle. Members of the Holden Beach Turtle Patrol will be available to answer questions about the turtles and the program. Turtle Talk is open to all family members and enjoyed by people of all ages with no admission charge.

The Holden Beach Turtle Patrol also offers a program for younger turtle enthusiasts. Children’s Turtle Time will be at 4 p.m. Wednesdays, June 27, July 11, July 18, 25 and Aug. 1 at the Holden Beach Town Hall. This class will feature crafts, stories and activities for children 3-6. All children must be accompanied by a parent or guardian. For more information on this program, call the Holden Beach Parks and Recreation Department at 842-6488.

Holden Beach is a turtle sanctuary and every year sea turtles are welcomed and protected on the beach. Founded in 1989, the HBTP protects sea turtles through education, nest protection and sea turtle rescue. The Turtle Patrol operates under the authority of the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. In its 30th year, this all-volunteer program is supported by sale of an annual T-shirt and donations.

This year’s shirt is maroon and celebrates “30 Years and Still Counting.” The shirts are $15 for the youth sizes and $17 for the adults and 2X and 3X will be $20. Long-sleeved shirts are $22 for S to XL and $25 for 2X and 3X. T-shirts will be available for sale at Turtle Talk programs and at the Lighthouse Gift Shop on the causeway in Holden Beach. Shirts are also available by mail (see the website for details).

For more information on Turtle Talk, the Holden Beach Turtle Patrol or how to volunteer or support, go to www.hbturtlewatch.org.
Read more » click here


Factoid That May Interest Only Me –The National Flood Insurance Program
The National Flood Insurance Program aims to reduce the impact of flooding on private and public structures. It does so by providing affordable insurance to property owners and by encouraging communities to adopt and enforce floodplain management regulations. These efforts help mitigate the effects of flooding on new and improved structures. Overall, the program reduces the socio-economic impact of disasters by promoting the purchase and retention of general risk insurance, but also of flood insurance, specifically.
Read more » click here

National Flood Insurance Program: Reauthorization
Congress must periodically renew the NFIP’s statutory authority to operate. On March 23, 2018, the President signed legislation passed by Congress that extends the National Flood Insurance Program’s (NFIP’s) authorization to July 31, 2018. Congress must now reauthorize the NFIP by no later than 11:59 pm on July 31, 2018.

FEMA and Congress have never failed to honor the flood insurance contracts in place with NFIP policyholders. In the unlikely event the NFIP’s authorization lapses, FEMA would still have authority to ensure the payment of valid claims with available funds. However, FEMA would stop selling and renewing policies for millions of properties in communities across the nation. Nationwide, the National Association of Realtors estimates that a lapse might impact approximately 40,000 home sale closings per month.

NFIP reauthorization is an opportunity for Congress to take bold steps to reduce the complexity of the program while transitioning it to a sounder financial framework. The level of damage from the 2017 hurricanes makes it abundantly clear that FEMA needs a holistic plan to ready the Nation for managing the cost of catastrophic flooding under the NFIP.
Read more » click here

Update –


Flood insurance program could lapse in midst of hurricane season.

What home buyers need to know

  • The federal flood insurance program already has been reauthorized six times since September 2017.
  • When the program lapsed for a month in 2010, an estimated 1,400 home-sales closings were canceled or delayed each day.
  • In some high-risk areas, the only option for coverage is through the government plan.
    Read more » click here

Hurricane Season Has Begun. Do You Need Flood Insurance?
The Atlantic hurricane season is here, and with it the threat of storm-related flooding. So homeowners may want to buy flood insurance, if they don’t already have coverage. Hurricane season runs from June through November. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has forecast a “near- or above-normal” hurricane season this year, with one to four “major” hurricanes expected. Standard homeowner policies typically don’t cover damage from floodwaters resulting from rising tides, flash floods or overflowing streams. To get flood coverage, you’ll need to buy a separate flood policy. Most flood insurance is sold through the National Flood Insurance Program, which is administered by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and covers about five million policyholders. A few private companies also sell coverage.
Read more » click here


Things I Think I Think –

Dining #2Eating out is one of the great little joys of life.

Restaurant Review:
Dinner Club visits a new restaurant once a month. Ratings reflect the reviewer’s reaction to food, ambience and service, with price taken into consideration.
///// March 2018
Name:              Shuckin’ Shack
Cuisine:
           Seafood
Location:        1175 Turlington Ave., Leland NC
Contact:          910.221.5522 /
http://www.theshuckinshack.com/location/loc/leland

Food:                Average / Very Good / Excellent / Exceptional
Service:           Efficient / Proficient / Professional / Expert
Ambience:      Drab / Plain / Distinct / Elegant
Cost:                 Inexpensive <=17 / Moderate <=22 / Expensive <=27 / Exorbitant <=40
Rating:            Two Stars
Shuckin’ Shack is a franchise with double-digit locations in multiple states. The closest one to us is located at The Villages of Brunswick Forest in Leland. Relaxing casual atmosphere it’s a cool little place. The menu is the same for lunch and dinner. Although the menu offerings are somewhat limited, they have a lot of good stuff there.  It’s totally worth a visit, however I’m thinking it is a better lunch than dinner venue. Their slogan says it all, showing each guest A GOOD SHUCKIN’ TIME!


/////
Book Review:
Read several books from The New York Times best sellers fiction list monthly
Selection represents this month’s pick of the litter
/////


 

 

 


THE RED SPARROW TRILOGY
by Jason Matthew
The “Red Sparrow” trilogy is a political thriller series which includes the books Red Sparrow, Palace of Treason, and The Kremlin’s Candidate. The first book Red Sparrow is now a major motion picture starring Jennifer Lawrence. Matthews, a retired officer of the CIA’s Operations Directorate, offers the reader a classic spy thriller that evokes the Cold War era of espionage. Russian intelligence officer Dominika Egorov has been assigned to Nate Nash, a CIA officer who handles the organization’s most sensitive Russian intelligence. The trilogy follows Dominika from her humble beginnings as a “Sparrow” to becoming the Director of the SVR the Russian foreign intelligence service and a double agent for the CIA. In each book the stories revolve around the espionage dance between the Russian (SVR) and American (CIA) intelligence networks, intertwined with a love story between Dominika and Nate. .


HBPOIN / Lou’s Views
.         
• Gather and disseminate information
.           • Identify the issues and determine how they affect you
.           • Act as a watchdog
.           • Grass roots monthly newsletter since 2008

https://lousviews.com/

05 – Town Meeting

Lou’s Views

Town Meeting 05/08/18

“Unofficial” Minutes & Comments


Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet
For more information
» click here


1. Discussion and Possible Action – Construction Management Services of the Vacuum Sewer System #4 Upgrade Status Report – Public Works Director Clemmons 

Previously reported – December 2017
McGill and Associates were commissioned to perform a Sewer Study to evaluate sewer system vulnerability reducing measures. A fiscal year 2017-2018 budget appropriation of $1,413,000 was made to accommodate total programmatic expenses of Lift Station #4 improvements. Green Engineering firm was awarded the $158,000 contract for Sewer System #4 upgrade. Green Engineering will provide all engineering services required to construct a vulnerability reducing structure of Lift Station #4.

Previously reported – April 2018
Four (4) meetings have been held between staff and the engineering firm to date. The final plans were delivered to the Town and have been reviewed and approved by the Building Inspector. Deliverables – Timeline has been revised. Buildings were designed in the same style as Town Hall. We are currently on schedule, but Chris cautioned that it was still early in the game. The Board requested monthly updates, reporting on whether we remained on schedule and within budget.

Update –
We’ve had a slight setback, we did not receive the three (3) bids required to move forward. Officially we accepted no bids, the two bids submitted will be held and opened upon the completion of the second go round. Chris was a little surprised and disappointed since their appeared to be a lot of interest when they held meeting with vendors. We will need to start the bid process over. The protocols on the second bid process do not require the three bids but the caveat is we can only consider quality bids.

This really could be handled with a memo from Chris to the Board. It is unnecessary to have a monthly presentation to report the number of meetings that were held, number and amount of checks that were cut. Presentation should only be made if something significant has transpired.


2. Discussion and Possible Scheduling of a Date to Award Contract for Vacuum Sewer System #4 Upgrade – Town Clerk Finnell 

Agenda Packet –
There are several items requiring meetings for the Board on the upcoming agenda. I am having a hard time finding dates where all Board members are available during the month of May. The following dates are suggested, unless the Board would like me to solicit further dates in June. Unfortunately, due to the importance of timing on a couple of the issues, the full Board may not be available on the recommended dates.

Award of Contract for Vacuum Sewer System #4 Upgrade – Bids are due on May 8th, the day of the Board meeting. We recommend waiting until Green Engineering qualifies the most responsive bid and then scheduling a special meeting at that time.

Update –
The Vacuum Sewer System #4 Upgrade Project bids are now due on May 17th. The Board has scheduled to hold a Public Hearing on May 23rd at 1:00pm this item will be added to the meeting agenda.


4. Police Report – Chief Wally Layne

Police PatchThey are in the process of gearing up for “the season”
Festival was a preview of what’s to come
Tourists are already here, and there will be a lot more very soon
It’s the beginning of the busy season on Holden Beach
Memorial Day is the official kickoff for the 100 fun days of summer


Previously reported –
April 2018
Believe it or not we made it all the way through the winter with no break-ins. It was the best winter since he got here. Unfortunately, that is no longer the case. We’ve had five (5) break-ins in the last five (5) days. They have a suspect and anticipate an arrest shortly.

Update –
They have apprehended the party involved and he is currently in custody

Personnel Changes –
The Officer they hired is being processed through the system
The state has not approved the paperwork yet

Parking –
§
72.02  PARKING REGULATED ON PUBLIC STREETS AND RIGHTS-OF-WAY.

      (1)   All vehicles must be as far off the public street rights-of-way as possible; and

      (2)   No vehicle may be left parked on any portion of any roadway; and

      (3)   No vehicle may be parked on portion of the sidewalk.

We had a serious accident on OBW
Fortunately the driver was not injured although he was taken to the hospital
Driver of the car ran into the back of a box truck that was sticking out onto the roadway
Wally described the situation as a scab that has been picked
He’s hearing a lot of negative chatter about the police not enforcing the Ordinances
Despite that public perception they are diligently enforcing the Ordinances


Public Safety Announcement
Chief Layne would like to remind everyone that it is important to protect your personal property. Remove all items of value from your vehicle when you are not driving it. Always lock your vehicle doors when you are not in it. Leaving items on display, whether on the dashboard or sitting on a passenger seat, is an invitation to opportunist individuals. Make sure to follow these important tips!


Crime Prevention 101 – Don’t make it easy for them
Don’t leave vehicles unlocked
Don’t leave valuables in your vehicles


A reminder of the Town’s beach strand ordinances:
…..1)
Chapter 90 / Animals / § 90.20 / Responsibilities of owners
…….a)
pets are not allowed on the beach strand except between 5p.m. and 9a.m. daily
…….b)
dog’s must be on a leash at all times
…….c)
owner’s need to clean up after their animals
…..2)
Chapter 94 / Beach regulations / § 94.05 / Digging of holes on beach strand
…….a)
digging holes greater than 12 inches deep without responsible person there
…….b)
holes shall be filled in prior to leaving
…..3)
Chapter 94 / Beach regulations / § 94.06 / Placing obstructions on the beach strand
…….a)
all unattended beach equipment must be removed daily by 6:00pm


Pets on the beach strand
Pets – Chapter 90 / Animals / § 90.20
From May 20th through September 10th
It is unlawful to have any pet on the beach strand
        • During the hours of 9:00am through 5:00pm

Golf Carts
Golf carts are treated the same as other automotive vehicles
Town ordinances state no parking anytime on OBW
Therefore golf carts are illegally parked when left by any beach access points

Neighborhood Watch

  • Need to look out for each other and report any suspicious activity
  • Call 911 if you see or hear anything suspicious
  • Fill out Keep Check Request Form if you will be out of town
  • Submit completed Property Registration Form
  • Pickup copy of Protecting Your Home

4. Discussion and Possible Scheduling of a Date to Hold a Public Hearing for Floodplain Ordinance and Accompanying Maps– Town Clerk Finnell 

Agenda Packet –
There are several items requiring meetings for the Board on the upcoming agenda. I am having a hard time finding dates where all Board members are available during the month of May. The following dates are suggested, unless the Board would like me to solicit further dates in June. Unfortunately, due to the importance of timing on a couple of the issues, the full Board may not be available on the recommended dates.

Public Hearing for Floodplain Ordinance and Accompanying Maps – We recommend scheduling it for the beginning of the next Board meeting, June 19th.

Previously reported – February 2018
Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM)
The preliminary maps were published in August 2014. In February 2018 the Town received approval from FEMA for revisions to the Holden Beach Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM). These map revisions will be effective August 28, 2018 once the Town formally updates our local ordinances. The Town staff is working on an implementation schedule and anticipates being able to use the new maps for construction in late May.

Previously reported – April 2018
North Carolina General Statutes require public hearings for adoption and amendment of land use ordinances, and a Flood Damage Prevention Ordinance is considered a land use ordinance.

        • County – § 153A-323
.         •
Municipality – § 160A-364

Before adopting or amending any ordinance authorized by this …, the [community] shall hold a public hearing on it. A notice of the public hearing shall be given once a week for two successive calendar weeks in a newspaper having general circulation in the area. The notice shall be published the first time not less than 10 days nor more than 25 days before the date fixed for the hearing. In computing such period, the day of publication is not to be included but the day of the hearing shall be included.

 The Town needs to adopt FPM Ordinance for it to be effective on August28, 2018. Tim will submit Ordinance at the next scheduled regular meeting for the BOC’s approval. We can start using the preliminary maps once we adopt the Ordinance. But we can’t get a reduction in our flood insurance rates until the new maps become effective at the end of August.

TOWN WEBSITE –
The Town has received approval from FEMA for revisions to the Holden Beach Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM). These map revisions will be effective August 28, 2018 once the Town formally updates our local ordinances. The Town staff is working on an implementation schedule and anticipates being able to use the new maps for construction in late May. These maps may be viewed at http://www.ncfloodmaps.com.

Update –
The Board has scheduled to hold a Public Hearing at the BOC’s June Regular Meeting on June 19th


5. Discussion and Possible Scheduling of a Date to Hold a Public Hearing Regarding the Adoption of a System Development Fee Analysis – Town Clerk Finnell

Agenda Packet –
There are several items requiring meetings for the Board on the upcoming agenda. I am having a hard time finding dates where all Board members are available during the month of May. The following dates are suggested, unless the Board would like me to solicit further dates in June. Unfortunately, due to the importance of timing on a couple of the issues, the full Board may not be available on the recommended dates.

Public Hearing Regarding the Adoption of a System   Development Fees Analysis – The engineering firm is available to hold the Public Hearing on May 23rd at 1:00 p.m. or a backup date of May 22nd at 1:00 p.m.

Previously reported –
McGill and Associates has prepared the System Development Fees Report for the Town. The report was posted to our website on March 261h and written comments were solicited. The report must be posted for at least 45 days.

In accordance with §162A-209, after expiration of the posting period, the Board needs to hold a public hearing prior to considering the adoption of the analysis. We recommend the Board schedule the public hearing for May 14th.

System Development Fees Report
Click here to view the System Development Fees Report prepared by McGill and Associates in accordance with HB 436. Written comments on the report may be sent to heather@hbtownhall.com. Comments will also be accepted by mail at Town of Holden Beach, Attn: Heather Finnell, 110 Rothschild Street, Holden Beach, NC 28462. The Board will schedule a public hearing prior to considering the adoption of the analysis. Information on the public hearing date will be provided when available.

Update –
The Board has scheduled to hold a Public Hearing on May 23rd at 1:00pm


Notice of Public Hearing

The Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach will hold a Public Hearing on May 23, 2018 at 1:00 p.m. or shortly thereafter in the Town Hall Public Assembly, 110 Rothschild Street, Holden Beach, NC 28462 to hear a presentation on the study of System Development Fees that could be levied by the Town. This hearing, the study and the presentation are in accordance with NC Administrative Code 15A NCAC 18C.0409 and 15A NCAC 02T.011. McGill Associates will present the study results which is posted on our website. Click here to view the study. All interested people are invited to attend.


6. Discussion and Possible Reclassification of Shoreline Protection and Recreation Manager Position to Assistant Town Manager Position – Town Manager Hewett

 Agenda Packet –
Position Reclassification of Shoreline Protection and Recreation Programs Manager

This memo requests Board of Commissioners reclassify the current Shoreline Protection and Recreation Programs Manager position as an Assistant Town Manager (Atch).

The proposed reclassification is necessary to reflect the actual roles and responsibilities that the position has evolved into and the incumbent is currently performing.  Increased demand and focus on shoreline matters along with continuing growth of recreation functions has driven the need for raising the scope, visibility and authority of the existing position.

The current Shoreline Protection Recreation Manager position was the only position not “trued up” in the 2015 employee salary review.  The reclassified position’s range of $49,224 to $74,063 has been established using operational audit benchmarks for work of equivalent levels in terms of responsibility, facilities and community relevance. Reclassification will result in an annual salary rate increase for the incumbent to the range minimum equaling $7,854; the residual of which can be sourced from existing resources for the remainder of this fiscal year and will be subsequently budgeted in accordance with the Personnel Policy for the fiscal year beginning 1July 2018.

It is recommended that the reclassification become effective immediately subject to administrative and personnel actions required for implementation.

Purpose: Primary Assistant to the Town Manager for Programs and Projects Management of all beach, inlet, canal and waterway projects. Performs highly responsible program and project executive, technical and administrative work with regard to the development and direction of recreation programs for all groups, age and interest levels within the Town.  As may be required serves as staff liaison to the Beach & Inlet Board and the Parks & Recreation Advisory Board. Responsible for developing and maintaining adequate park and recreation facilities needed to make programs effective; performs related work as required.

Town Manager Hewett indicated that they are redefining the job in recognition of what Christy Ferguson is already doing. The intent is to shift her focus to the shoreline protection portion of the job description. When questioned by the Board David gave what can only be described as nebulous answers. Commissioner Freer said, “Not making the argument then to me David, because then why change it, you just described the same job then.” They then had the chutzpah to use the $6.9 million dollars of FEMA approved hurricane reimbursement funds as part of the justification. So according to Commissioner Freer, David didn’t make a very good case to approve this proposal; that didn’t stop them from approving it anyway.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

 
I’d describe this as an agita inducing moment!


The Parks & Recreation Advisory Board members were big cheerleaders for implementing this action.
So far, everyone else I’ve spoken to considers this action to be outrageous.

Let me get this straight, we gave the Town Manager a raise of $38,028 ostensibly because he does two jobs, Town Manager and Finance Officer. The salary adjustment not only puts him above the average but makes him the highest paid Town Manager with the least amount of responsibilities if we benchmark off the surrounding island communities. We have a Town Manager that makes $136,500, with just twenty-four (24) employees, and now we need an Assistant Town Manager. Really?! Based on our recent audit where we had two (2) significant deficiencies I’d say we need to split the Town Manager jobs and hire a Finance Officer instead of creating this position.

But wait, it gets better. The justification given is that the new position reflects the actual roles and responsibilities that the position has evolved into and the incumbent is currently performing with an increased focus on shoreline matters. The proposed position has a salary range that goes to $74,063. So, we can have an employee making up to $36 hour that will be running our Boo at the Beach, Breakfast with Santa, Easter Egg Hunt, Tide Dyed Program and Summer Day Camp Program. With the alleged change in focus will she have time to run our recreation programs? If not her then who will? Are we planning to hire another person to be our Recreation Programs Manager? Which brings us to that excluding tourist season who are all these programs for anyway? Most of the events don’t appear to be for the residents so why are we even doing them? But I digress.

Let’s call this what it is a con job. The current position, Shoreline Protection & Recreation Manager, has a salary range of $32,000 to $46,000 with Christy in the mid-range at $41,350. The new position has a salary range of $49,000 to $74,000. Keep in mind, Christy does not have a degree in local government administration or practical experience in municipal government administration. So, our plan is to make her the Assistant Town Manager with a salary of  $48,934 by giving her a $7,584 salary increase which is almost a 19% raise. Despite the change in her title and salary she will basically continue to do what she is doing right now. In 2014 the salary for that position was $29,286 in 2018, just four years later, the salary will be $48,934 a 67% increase. Nice work if you can get it!

I get that she has earned a salary increase and I’m OK with changing the pay range. However, I do object to the change in pay range which is ridiculous. Now instead of being at the midpoint in that jobs pay range she will be at the bottom or minimum for the pay window which insures significant annual merit increases in the future until she gets back to the midpoint in the pay range. The same thing could have been accomplished with a more reasonable change to the pay range of say $40,000 to $54,000, with the proposed salary increase that would have put her slightly above the midpoint.

To be perfectly clear this has nothing to do with how I feel about the Town Manager or the Shoreline Protection & Recreation Manager and the jobs that they are doing, it is strictly about the BOC’s fiduciary responsibilities to us.  This Board just got played by the Town Manager just like the last Board did. Let’s face it they were duped again!

Nothing to see here, move along folks!


7. Discussion and Possible Acceptance of Donation of Turtle Sculpture – Per Board at April Meeting 

Agenda Packet –
My name Is Bill Witchger I have been coming to Holden in July for over 40 years. You have done a great job of keeping it a place our family enjoys. I started coming and staying with my Brother Gene before I had children. My family is now 8 children and 23 grandchildren.

My wife Kathy passed away of cancer 10 years ago. The kids wanted to do something in remembrance of her. She loved Holden and the sea turtles. I have a very good friend who Is a sculptor Jack Kreutzer from Loveland Colorado. He has been coming to Holden and staying at our place in September. I commissioned him to cast 10 small bronze sculptures of a sea turtle. Each of my children now has one and I would like to give one to the town on approval of life size version. We would like it to be installed in a public place where all can enjoy. Maybe it could be installed by the pavilion or in a playground. I would be happy to set up some kind of a trust to maintain it. We have 5 cottages in my family and the youngest child is 3 months. Witchger’s will be coming to Holden for many years to come.

If that is not possible we will put it on one of our properties. We are coming down the last two weeks of July and hope to install it then. Thanks for your consideration.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Agreed to accept donation but have not yet determined where it should go on the island


8. Discussion and Possible Acceptance of Easement from Margaret N. Devaney/ Ables – Town Manager Hewett

 

Agenda Packet –
Grant of Easement across Able Property

Town staff has been working for an extended period of time with the Ables to acquire a permanent access and utilities easement across the property near the end of Heron Landing Wynd. Acquisition of the easement will facilitate the maintenance of the Town’s property; i.e., the dredge spoil area, that lies to the east of the Ables’ and also enable the installation of utilities. The easement will limit ingress to pedestrian traffic only in addition to those government sponsored vehicles required for maintenance etc. At this printing there are a couple of refinements needing to be made in order to satisfy both parties. I anticipate resolution before the end of the week. Included is the draft easement. Thanks.


DEED OF EASEMENT

 WITNESSETH:

WHEREAS, Grantor is the owner of Lot 22, Heron Landing Subdivision as shown on that map recorded in Map Cabinet 20 at Page 43, Brunswick County; and

WHEREAS, Grantor intends to convey the easement as described herein subject to the restrictions and limitations set forth herein; and

NOW, THEREFORE,  the Grantor,  in consideration  of  the sum  of  TEN  DOLLARS ($1 0.00)   and   other   good   and   valuable   consideration,   the   receipt   of   which   is  hereby acknowledged, has bargained and sold and by these presents does hereby sell and convey unto the Grantee a certain nonexclusive easement and right-of-way for ingress and egress across the lands of the Grantor located in Brunswick County, North Carolina, as hereinbelow described (the “Easement Area”) subject to the following restrictions:

1. Members of the general public shall use the Easement Area solely for ingress and egress to and from the property owned by the Town of Holden Beach and lying to the east of the Easement Area and Parcel A and such use shall be limited to the period between sunrise and Ingress and egress by the general public shall be by foot or by bicycle only. The general public shall have no right of ingress or egress by means of any motorized vehicle or conveyance of any kind.

2. The Town of Holden Beach, its successors and assigns, shall have the right of ingress and egress across the Easement Area only with vehicles owned by the Town of Holden Beach or contractors and subcontractors of the Town of Holden Beach.    Additionally, vehicles owned   by the State of North Carolina   or United States   government, their contractors   and subcontractors, shall have access across the Easement Area.

3. Ingress and egress across  the Easement  Area by the Town  of Holden  Beach,  the State, or federal government shall be solely for the purpose of maintaining the spoil area that lies to the east of the Easement Area and Parcel A and for installing, maintaining, repairing, and replacing any other public improvements  constructed on property lying to the east of the Easement Area and Parcel A The Town of Holden Beach shall  also have such right of ingress and egress  in order  to provide public utilities and services to Parcel A No right of ingress or egress across the Easement Area by the Town  of  Holden  Beach, the State or federal government  shall  be permitted  for any reason other than those reasons set forth in this paragraph 3.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

The Town already owns several parcels there, the easement is for Parcel ID #246AE07303. The Town owned dredge spoil area is not currently accessible, this action only benefits the Town.


9. Discussion and Possible Scheduling of a Date to Hold Interviews for the Inlet and Beach Protection Board – Town Clerk Finnell

Agenda Packet –
There are several items requiring meetings for the Board on the upcoming agenda. I am having a hard time finding dates where all Board members are available during the month of May. The following dates are suggested, unless the Board would like me to solicit further dates in June. Unfortunately, due to the importance of timing on a couple of the issues, the full Board may not be available on the recommended dates.

Interviews for the Inlet & Beach Protection Board –
We recommend scheduling the interviews for June 19th at 6:45 p.m.

The Board agreed to schedule interviews fifteen (15) minutes before the BOC’s June Regular Meeting on June 19th


10. Town Manager’s Report

Tax Notice
The last tax notice is going out this week

BEMC
They have completed the street light replacement project
Swap out will increase our annual lighting bill by $6,000

Roadway Work
Highland Paving Asphalt was awarded the contract for roadway work for the maintenance of existing streets on the island in accordance with the approved Streets Survey dated November 2015. The streets having work done this year are Marlin and Boyd. The Town anticipates that work will be started next week.

Pointe West
The Town anticipates that work will be started next week on the Storm Water Project

NCDOT
The Town is working with DOT on parking and street signs encroachment agreement

Town Mobile App
They recently announced the release of our Town mobile app.
This new social media tool is a mobile friendly version of our website.
It now shows all the public beach accesses, parking, showers, etc.
This is a FREE app. Visit the Apple Store or Google Play
Search “Holden Beach” to download the app

Pickleball Tournament
They had about sixty (60) participants including representatives from the island

Splash Pad
Soft start the week prior to Memorial Day


General Comments –

There were twenty-four (24) members of the community in attendance

The BOC’s next Regular Meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, June 19th

Town Manager’s Review
The Town Managers performance review was supposed to be done on the anniversary date of his hire which is in February. Once again it was not done in a timely manner.

We are approaching the hurricane season.
Be prepared – have a plan!


BOC’s SPECIAL MEETING / May 3, 2018  
.     1) Budget Workshop Revenue and Expense
.     2)
Budget Goals Status

The request made by the Board was for a top-level management summary. They simply want the Finance Department to roll-up the numbers from the Budget Message. It took the better part of an hour for them to get the Town Manager to agree to this requested reporting change. You can’t make this stuff up!

Once again, the Board talked about making changes. They want to have more input with greater participation in the process. To accomplish that will require scheduling additional workshop meetings. Sound familiar?

BOC’s SPECIAL MEETINGJanuary 2017
Budget Workshop takeaways are as follows:
    1)
Board wants to be more involved in the budget process
.     2)
Modified meeting schedule to have more time to discuss issues
.     3)
Board wants to take a Fiscal Conservative Approach
.     4)
Board wants to be engaged and have input not just rubber stamp submitted budget

 It is now some sixteen (16) months later and all things are as they were …


Budget
Kickoff of our budget season
Local governments must balance their budget by a combination of the following:
. 1)
Raising taxes
. 2)
Cutting spending
. 3)
Operating more efficiently
The Town Manager’s proposed budget is due by June 1st
Commissioners must adopt budget no later than June 30th for the next fiscal year

Adopting the annual budget is a primary responsibility of the Board.

Budget Meeting Schedule / 2018
. 1) 16 January BOC’s Workshop Goals & Objectives / Capital Program
* Only eleven (11) members of the community were in attendance
. 2) 19 January BOC’s Workshop Goals & Objectives
*
Only two (2) members of the community were in attendance
. 3) 23 February Canal Dredging Working Group
. 4)
9 March Departments input to Manager
. 5) 6 April
BOC’s Workshop Revenues
* Only five (5) members of the community were in attendance
. 6)
13 April BOC’s Workshop Expenses
* Only five (5) members of the community were in attendance
. 7) 3 May BOC’s Workshop Revenues & Expenses
* Only five (5) members of the community were in attendance
. 8)
31 May Budget Message
. 9)
13 June Public Hearing
. 10)
19 June Regular BOC’s Meeting
. 11)
30 June Budget adopted (No Later Than)


Public Water and Sewer System Development Fee Act
Audit Committee BOC’s Tasker Regarding House Bill 436

House Bill 436
Authority to impose fees has been modified
Necessitates us having to retool water and sewer fee rate schedule
Recommends it be prepared by licensed professional engineer
Town Manager plans to commission McGill and Associates to develop rate schedule

North Carolina General Assembly – House Bill 1730 / S.L. 2004-96
Enacted on 07/13/2004
Gives us the authority to charge the sewer treatment fee
For more information » click here

Holden Beach Sewer Treatment Fee
For more information » click here

A sewer capital fee of $497.30 per developable property within the corporate limits of the Town of Holden Beach is authorized for the payment of debt service to fulfill the Town’s sewer capital obligation. Said fee is to be billed concurrently with ad valorem property taxes and collected in accordance with applicable North Carolina General Statues.

The Town Budget Ordinance is where the actual assessment is made
That levy is contained in language on page 7 of Ordinance 17-08
For more information » click here

House Bill 436 / Public Water and Sewer System Development Fee Act
Enacted on 07/20/2017
Eliminates the authority to charge the fee
Town must comply not later than July 1,2018
For more information » click here

System Development Fees Report
Click here to view the System Development Fees Report prepared by McGill and Associates in accordance with HB 436. Written comments on the report may be sent to heather@hbtownhall.com. Comments will also be accepted by mail at Town of Holden Beach, Attn: Heather Finnell, 110 Rothschild Street, Holden Beach, NC 28462. The Board will schedule a public hearing prior to considering the adoption of the analysis. Information on the public hearing date will be provided when available.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY and PURPOSE STATEMENT

Executive Summary:

The North Carolina General Assembly passed House Bill 436 in July 2017, amending Chapter 162A of the General Statutes by adding “Article 8, System Development Fees.” This amendment was enacted as “An Act to Provide for Uniform Authority to Implement System Development Fees for Public Water and Sewer Systems in North Carolina and to Clarify the Applicable Statute of Limitations.” in HB436, which requires compliance with designated calculation methodology by July 1, 2018.

In response to the House Bill 436, the Town of Holden Beach retained McGill Associates to complete a system development fee analysis. Based on the Town of Holden Beach’s combination of existing system capacity and planned capital improvements to expand capacity, the development fee, in accordance with HB 436 rules for an Equivalent Residential Unit (ERU) for water and sewer was calculated to be $20,577. ERU is defined as the water and sewer capacities required to serve the most typical user type, which is a three-bedroom single-family dwelling.

The fee for other types of development can be calculated by applying the calculated cost of capacity per gallon of flow per day to the water and wastewater demands for various uses as defined by NC Administrative Code 15A NCAC 18C .0409 and 15A NCAC 02T .0114 using the following table:

Holden Beach System Development Fees: Cost per Gallon per Day Calculation
Item Cost-Justified System Fee Cost of Capacity ($ / gpd)

1 Water System $14.48 ($ / gpd)
2 Sewer System $41.07 ($ / gpd)


Hurricane Season –

Hurricane #1 - CR

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) defines a hurricane as “an intense tropical weather system with a well-defined circulation and maximum sustained winds of 74 mph (64 knots) or higher.”

Be prepared – have a plan!

For assistance with making an emergency plan read more here »
. 1) FEMA Ready
. 2) American Red Cross Disaster and Safety Library
. 3) ReadyNC
. 4) Town Emergency Information
. 5) HBPOIN Hurricane Emergency Plan

THB – EVACUATION, CURFEW & VEHICLE DECALS
For more information » click here

A repeat of 2017′: Experts predict another destructive hurricane season
A scientist with Global Weather Oscillations is predicting the 2018 Atlantic hurricane season to be “somewhat of a repeat of 2017,” claiming this year will bring more devastating storms. According to GWO, a storm prediction company, this year’s Atlantic hurricane season may be just as destructive — or even more destructive — than the 2017 season, which ended with 17 named storms and 6 major hurricanes. In 2017, GWO predicted 16 named storms, eight hurricanes and four major hurricanes. Professor David Dilley, senior research and prediction scientist for GWO, predicts that 2018 will be “somewhat of a repeat of 2017,” but some hurricane landfalls will occur in different locations this year. Dilley anticipates 16 named storms, eight hurricanes and four major hurricanes. He also predicts four of the hurricanes have potential for U.S. landfall — with two likely being “major impact storms.” “Some United States zones and the Caribbean Islands are currently in their strongest hurricane landfall cycle in 40 to 70-years,” Dilley said in a statement. Dilley says the reason for another disastrous hurricane season has to do with ocean water temperatures. He explains how the temperatures continue to run warmer than normal across most of the Atlantic, especially in the Caribbean region and the Atlantic near the U.S. “This is very similar to the ocean temperatures of last year, and this will again be conducive for tropical storms and/or hurricanes forming and/or strengthening near the Lesser Antilles and close to the United States,” he added.
Read more » click here

Hurricane Preparation Presentation
Oak Island town staff will host a hurricane preparation presentation from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, May 22, at Oak Island Town Hall Council Chambers, 4601 E. Oak Island Drive. Presenters from the Oak Island police and fire departments, along with the National Weather Service, Brunswick County Emergency Management and American Red Cross, will attend to answer questions and share information. All are invited.


Terminal Groin –Terminal Groin #6 - CR

USACE PUBLIC NOTICE

Issue Date:  April 19, 2018
Corps Action ID: SAW-2011-01914

All interested parties are hereby advised that the Wilmington District, Corps of Engineers (Corps), at the request of the Town of Holden Beach, is withdrawing the permit application to implement a shoreline protection project along the east end of the island, including the construction of a terminal groin along the Lockwoods Folly Inlet, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The Corps is no longer seeking comments and has ceased our permit review for the Town’s proposal.
Read more » click here

For more information, go to the Terminal Groin post


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