02 – News & Views

Lou’s Views
News & Views / February Edition

Calendar of Events –


Azalea Festival Logo
N.C. Azalea Festival
April 3rd – 7th
Wilmington


Wilmington has been celebrating Spring Southern Style since 1948. There’s something for everyone among their community’s rich array of artwork, gardens, history and culture. This will be the 72nd annual festival and is considered one of the top events in the Southeast.
For more information » click here


Southport Spring Festival LogoSouthport Spring Festival
April 19
th – 20th
Southport


Welcome Spring Easter weekend in style at the Southport Spring Festival, a tradition for more than 25 years. This festival features a wide variety of activities.
For more information » click here



.Days at the Docks Festival

April 27th – 28th
Holden Beach

.

The annual festival occurs in April or May and is sponsored by the Greater Holden Beach Merchants Association. It’s the Holden Beach way to kick-off the Spring and start the vacation season. In addition to the food and arts & crafts, enjoy live music & entertainment, a horseshoe tournament and the world famous “Bopple Race”. Lots of activities for the entire family!
For more information » click here



Blue Crab Festival

May 18th – 19th
Little River SC

.

This will be the 38th annual world famous Blue Crab Festival. It is held on the waterfront in Little River and is one of the largest festivals in the Southeast. The purpose of this festival is one that supports and showcases the fabulous atmosphere of the local communities.
For more information » click here


Events
TDA - logo
Discover a wide range of things to do in the Brunswick Islands for an experience that goes beyond the beach.
For more information » click here


Calendar of Events – Island


Easter Egg Hunt - CR

Family Nighttime Easter Egg Hunt / Tentative)
The Town will hold its fifth annual nighttime Easter Egg Hunt on Friday, April 19th beginning at 7:00 pm. Teams of four will compete against each other. This event is designed for youth and adults and will be held at Bridgeview Park. Participants will need to bring their own flashlights to the event. Registration is required and will only be taken by phone, call (910) 842-6488 to pre-register.


HB Pier - CR

Easter Sunrise Church Service / Tentative
Brunswick Islands Baptist Church and Holden Beach Chapel are sponsoring an Easter sunrise service at 6:30 a.m. Sunday April 21st at the Holden Beach Pier.


SEARCH 5K - CR

SEARCH 5K / Tentative
The event will be held here on Saturday, April 6th beginning at 10:00am. This is a free race to help fight childhood obesity. Last year they had approximately one thousand (1,000) participants. Please be aware of children and families on streets and sidewalks that morning.
.

SEARCH 5K program is an acronym for See Every Athlete Run for Conditional Health. The program focuses on a comprehensive running program for the youth in Brunswick County Schools. The purpose of the program and of this event is to work on reducing childhood obesity by promoting healthy, active lifestyles into adulthood.


HBBC

Holden Beach Beautification Club Plant Sale
The HBBC is holding their 8th Annual Plant Sale on Friday, April 26th and Saturday, April 27th at the Emergency Operations Center, which is beside Food Lion located at 1044 Sabbath Home Road. Landscaping plants, perennials, annuals, herbs and gardening gloves will be available for purchase. All funds generated from the plant sale are earmarked for beautification projects on the island. Visit the Beautification Club’s website at http://holdenbeachbc.org/ if you are unable to attend the plant sale but would like to contribute.


Days at the Docks Festival
This is either a one or two-day event. The festival occurs in April or May of each year and is sponsored by the Greater Holden Beach Merchants Association. This year it is April 27th & 28th. It’s the Holden Beach way to kick-off the Spring and start the vacation season.



Pickleball Tournament
Holden Beach is hosting their third annual Pickleball Tournament. This year the Battle at the Beach tournament is May 3rd to May 5th.

 

What is Pickleball you ask?

Pickleball: growing sport for seniors
Pickleball originated in 1965 on Bainbridge Island, Washington. The ball used is a perforated plastic ball similar to a Whiffle ball. The game is easy for beginners to learn, but can develop into a fast-paced, competitive game for experienced players. The net is a couple inches lower than a tennis court net and the court is smaller too (20 feet by 44 feet vs. 36 by 78), and the paddles are oversized ping pong paddles made of plywood, aluminum or graphite. The game can be played with two or four players. Experience in tennis, badminton and ping pong is helpful, as there are similarities with those sports. There already are over 100,000 players in the United States alone. When tennis and badminton players find it difficult to navigate the larger courts, the next step is Pickleball, where there is not as much running required.
Read more » click here


Parks & Recreation / Programs & Events
For more information » click here


Reminders –


SM - Phone Book - CR
The new tide charts are here! The new tide charts are here!”

Holden Beach Tide Charts – 2019


Dog Park Closed
The Dog Park is closed due to the canal dredging project. As it stands now, the USACE will not allow the Town to place material from the canal dredging in their spoil area. Pending CAMA approval, the Town plans on using land at the dog park as its spoils area. The dog park will remain closed until after the dredging project is complete. They anticipate the park will be closed until at least Memorial Day.


BOC’s Meeting
The Board of Commissioners’ March Regular Meeting is scheduled on the third Tuesday of the month, March 19th

 



News from Town of Holden Beach

The town sends out emails of events, news, agendas, notifications and emergency information. If you would like to be added to their mailing list, please go to their web site to complete your subscription to the Holden Beach E-Newsletter.
For more information » click here


Canal Dredging
The Town is planning to perform a complete dredge of all of the canals this coming fall/winter (November 2018 – Mar 2019). It is recommended that property owners begin getting ready for the canal dredging as early as possible by first assessing the condition of their bulkheads so that repairs on those structures can be made in plenty of time before dredging begins. This will not only provide for the best dredging effort, but also lesson the possibility of leaky bulkheads filling canals back in prematurely after dredge completion. The Town will also be conducting its annual inspection of the bulkheads. Likewise, it is also recommended that property owners begin to coordinate the actions needed to move your floating docks in anticipation of the actual dredge arrival in order to facilitate a better excavation near their pilings. Finally, boat movements should also be considered. You may want to begin planning for winter accommodations and repairs to your boat now. Remember that boat dry docks book up fast.

Dredging Project – October
Construction at the Scotch Bonnet dredge spoil area began this week in preparation for this winter’s canal dredging project. We ask that canal property owners begin to move their boats and docks if possible in preparation for the dredge event. The tentative schedule will begin with Holden Beach Harbor mid-November, followed by Heritage Harbor mid-January, and Harbor Acres mid-February.

Note: This schedule may be affected by inclement weather.

King Dredging is partially mobilized on site and is prepping containment area by dog park. Dredging scheduled to commence in the middle of November working the canals from east to west.

Dredging ProjectNovember
King Dredging is fully mobilized on site with dredge in canals. Scotch Bonnet dredge spoil area work is just about completed. Dredging operations are scheduled to commence the first day of December working the canals from east to west. Work is starting with Holden Beach Harbor, which includes canals between High Point and Greensboro. Property owners should have made dock and boat arrangements already, but if you haven’t there’s still a little time left.

King Dredging is just about ready to begin with the following tentative schedule:
. 1)
Holden Beach Harbor – December 1st through January 25th
. 2) Heritage Harbor – January 26th through February 25th
. 3) Harbor Acres – Feb 26th through April 9th

Dredging ProjectDecember
Canal Dredging operations are underway. The dredge “Patricia Sanderson” started work in the Holden Beach Harbor feeder canal late last week. Currently, the dredge is working near the northern end of Durham Street heading west in the feeder canal. If you haven’t taken care of making arrangements to move your in water boats you need to do so as soon as possible.

Dredging ProjectJanuary
Due to the size of the dredge, the contractor has asked that boats on lifts in Heritage Harbor be removed before dredging begins. This will allow for a better dredge in this set of canals as the dredge follows the designed template. The contractor anticipates beginning work in Heritage Harbor in February. Please accommodate the request at your earliest convenience.

Dredging ProjectFebruary
The dredging in Holden Beach Harbor is complete. The contractor is now dredging in Heritage Harbor. This set of canals includes Scotch Bonnet, Lions Paw, Starfish and Sand Dollar. Heritage Harbor work should be completed by the end of February based on the current schedule. The contractor will then move into Harbor Acres. Harbor Acres canal property owners should prepare to remove their boats from canals and from any lifts over the canals. Also, owners should swing their docks out of the way if possible. 

Update –
Both Holden Beach Harbor and Heritage Harbor dredge project has been completed. The contractor will start work in Harbor Acres sometime this week. (02/19/19)


Volunteers needed
The Town is always looking for people to volunteer for their various boards and committees. If you are interested in serving, please fill out a resume form and submit it to heather@hbtownhall.com.


Recycling-Bin
Curbside Recycling

Waste Industries is now offering curbside recycling for Town properties that desire to participate in the service. The service cost is $82.48 annually paid in advance to the Town of Holden Beach and consists of a ninety-six (96) gallon cart that is emptied every other week.
Curbside Recycling Application » click here
Curbside Recycling Calendar » click here


Elevator - CRElevators
Most states mandate that elevator systems be tested and inspected annually. Currently the state of North Carolina does not require annual inspections to be performed on all elevator systems. The use of unsafe and defective lifting devices imposes a substantial probability of serious and preventable injury to your family and guests. It is in the owner’s best interest to minimize injuries and liability by scheduling an annual safety inspection to ensure the safe operation of their elevator system.

Safety Notice –
Waupaca Elevator Company has issued an important safety notice. The potential hazard is associated with normal wear in your elevator. If your elevator develops the problem and it is not repaired, the elevator may drop unexpectedly with you in it and you may be injured. They recommend you contact your elevator service company.


Library
If you need something to keep you busy in this colder weather, make sure to visit the island library. The library is in the upstairs of Holden Beach Town Hall. All the books were donated. Patrons of the library don’t have to check out a book; they are on the honor system to return it.



Neighborhood Watch –

Need to look out for each other
Call 911 if you see or hear anything suspicious
Fill out Keep Check Request Form if you will be out of town
• Submit completed Property Registration Form
• Pickup copy of Protecting Your Home


Upon Further Review –

Development Fees

BOC’s Regular Meeting 06/19/18
Discussion and Possible Approval of Resolution 18-04,
Resolution Adopting System Development Fees Report

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED by the Holden Beach Board of Commissioners that the Town hereby adopts and approves the Cost-Justified Water and Wastewater System Development Fees Report created by McGill Associates, dated March 2018.

BOC’s Special Meeting 08/30/18
Discussion and Possible Action: Repeal the Board’s Previous Vote on Implementation of the Water and Sewer Development Fees as Required by House Bill 436 and to Replace that Decision with an Alternative Fee Schedule

They repealed and replaced the development fee schedule
.     a)
Repealed Resolution 18-05
.     b)
Replaced with the following interim fee schedule:
.         • Water Capacity Fee is $100 per bedroom
        •
Sewer Capacity Fee is $2,700 per bedroom

A five (5) bedroom in the sewer fee schedule before June 30th was $13,125
A five (5) bedroom in the new interim sewer fee schedule after June 30th is $13,500
A five (5) bedroom in both the old and the new interim water fee schedule is $500
Total cost of $14,000 vs. $13,625, approximately what the fees were before July 1st

For those property owners that already paid their sewer share fee they will get a credit of $2,700 per bedroom up to and including a five-bedroom house; additional bedrooms will be assessed at $2,700 per bedroom

This is an interim fee schedule until they have an opportunity to reevaluate the situation

BOC’s Special Meeting 10/05/18
Discussion of Activities and Timelines to Re-conduct the Determination of Maximum Sewer and Water System Development Fees and Subsequently Set “Permanent Fees Before the End of 2018″

All Pat said is that the interim rates would remain in effect for the next ninety (90) days which takes us into 2019. No discussion of activities, timelines, or variables being considered were shared with the public.

 ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

This was supposed to be an interim fee schedule
They committed to permanent fees before the end of 2018
Then they said the interim fees would remain in effect for the next ninety (90) days
Well both of those dates have come and gone
A
permanent fee schedule has yet to be adopted


Seismic Testing / Offshore Drilling

Previously reported – September 2015
Resolution 15-09 is in opposition to offshore exploration and drilling. Why? Because we have a tourism based economy, along with the local fishing industry and quality of life depends on the health and welfare of our natural resources. We believe that the inherent risks to our region from offshore exploration and drilling have the potential to irrevocably harm our natural environment, our economic well-being and our overall quality of life. Including us there are now 79 municipalities that have passed resolutions opposing offshore exploration and drilling.

Previously reported – December 2018
Trump admin. approves seismic tests for Atlantic offshore oil drilling
The approval moves forward a policy that many affected states don’t want.
Read more » click here

Did drilling off NC coast just move one step closer?
Environmentalists sue NOAA after agency last month said companies could harass fish and mammals during seismic testing
Read more » click here

Groups sue feds to stop seismic airgun blasting in Atlantic Ocean
Leading environmental groups sued the federal government today to prevent seismic airgun blasting in the Atlantic Ocean. This extremely loud and dangerous process, which is used to search for oil and gas deposits deep below the ocean’s surface, is the first step toward offshore drilling. If allowed, seismic airgun blasting would harm marine life, including whales, dolphins, fish and zooplankton – the foundation of the ocean food web.
Read more » click here

What did N.C. leaders do to reinforce their opposition to offshore drilling?
Less than a month after the federal government took an important step toward issuing seismic testing permits, North Carolina leaders have reiterated the state’s opposition to seismic and any other steps that could ultimately lead toward offshore drilling. Thursday, N.C. Governor Roy Cooper joined a bipartisan group of East Coast governors in a letter stating their strong opposition to both offshore drilling and seismic testing, while Attorney General Josh Stein was part of a group of attorneys general intervening in a lawsuit against the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).
Read more » click here

Dems introduce bills to block offshore drilling
A group of House Democrats introduced a suite of eight bills Tuesday aimed at blocking President Trump’s proposal to expand offshore oil and natural gas drilling around the country. Taken together, the bills would ban or put a 10-year moratorium on offshore drilling in the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic oceans, as well as the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The bills came as the Interior Department is expected soon to move forward on its plan released in January 2018 to open the offshore areas of the Atlantic, Pacific, Arctic and Gulf coasts to offshore oil and natural gas drilling. That plan has met stiff opposition from political leaders and coastal communities that neighbor nearly all of the areas.
Read more » click here

SC attorney general joins lawsuit to stop seismic testing, offshore drilling
S.C. Attorney General Alan Wilson joined a lawsuit Monday against the Trump administration to block seismic testing for oil and gas off the South Carolina coast.Backed by GOP Gov. Henry McMaster, Wilson became the first Republican attorney general to join a legal fight — launched by 16 S.C. cities, nine environmental groups and nine Democratic state attorneys general — to halt permits for exploration off the Atlantic Coast. Those suing say exploration will harm the environment and South Carolina tourism. Wilson’s filing unites an unlikely coalition in opposition to one of President Donald Trump’s highest priorities — expanding efforts to find new deposits of fossil fuels — as the Republican president seeks to roll back Obama-era regulations that blocked drilling on more than 90 percent of the outer continental shelf.
Read more » click here

Update –

Bill introduced to prevent seismic air gun testing in Atlantic Ocean
Rep. John Rutherford, R-Florida, and Rep. Jeff Van Drew, D-New Jersey, have introduced a bill to prohibit permit applications for seismic air gun testing in the Atlantic Ocean. A release from Rutherford’s office said the bill was introduced in response to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration issuing five Incidental Harassment Authorizations that would advance permit applications for seismic air gun blasting off the Atlantic coast. Seismic air gun testing is a step toward offshore oil and gas development and, according to the release, “a direct threat to the coastal fishing and tourism economies dependent on healthy ocean ecosystems.”  “The waters off the east coast are home to vulnerable mammal populations, military operations, tourist destinations and a vibrant maritime economy,” Rutherford said. “Allowing seismic testing in the Atlantic is unnecessary and potentially hazardous to the coastal communities that rely on a healthy ecosystem. The U.S. should not jeopardize our coastal economy by expanding seismic testing and offshore drilling, particularly when our energy needs continue to be met.” “Our local economy is dependent on fishing, tourism and wildlife watching — the bottom line is offshore oil and gas drilling isn’t worth the risk,” Van Drew said. The bill is called the Atlantic Coastal Economies Protection Act, according to the release.
Read more » click here


Previously reported –

Holden Beach Newsletter

 


Chemours has issued a press release announcing that the company will take measures to eliminate byproduct GenX wastewater emissions from its Fayetteville site.
Click here to view the release.

In order to keep citizens informed, Brunswick County has established a website to share information about GenX as they learn it. You can find this page at www.brunswickcountync.gov/genx. The website contains a FAQ section that they update as they learn additional information (or receive additional questions), links to all their press releases and links to other resources like information from NCDEQ. There is also a link where citizens can go to sign up to receive email updates on the topic.


The Public Information Officer for Brunswick County announced that the County has taken legal action against DuPont and Chemours for contaminating the Cape Fear River.

10.31.2017
Statement from Brunswick County
The filing of formal legal action against Chemours and DuPont represents another crucial step in protecting our public drinking water supply. It sends a clear message that Brunswick County will simply not stand for the discharge of emerging or unregulated chemicals into our public drinking water supply. Let us be clear…we will ensure that any company that threatens this vital resource is held responsible. Furthermore, our litigation team is consulting the nation’s leading experts to determine the best long-term water testing and treatment methods for the entire county. As part of that, we will ensure that the costs for doing so do not fall upon the rate payers, but upon those dumping the unregulated chemicals in the water.
For more information » click here

Previously reported – December 2018

NCDEQ does all it plans to do on lower Cape Fear GenX contaminants
The North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality has done all it intends to do to address GenX and other per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAs) in the lower Cape Fear River, based on answers provided in a Nov. 29 media conference call. Read more » click here

Why did CFPUA blast a proposed consent order between N.C. DEQ,
Chemours and Cape Fear River Watch?
State regulators are not looking out for the needs of residents or utilities downstream of Chemours’ Fayetteville Works facility, the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority (CFPUA) alleged in a pair of motions filed Thursday in Bladen County Superior Court.
Read more » click here

Chemours promises to reduce pollutants,
but concerns persist downstream
Read more » click here

EPA hits Chemours with notice of violation at Fayetteville Works
Chemours failed in several instances to inform federal regulators what chemicals it was using at its Fayetteville Works facility and what they were being used for, violating the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), according to a notice of violation the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued Wednesday. The notice stemmed from an inspection that a team of EPA staff and contractors conducted at Chemours’ site June 28 and 29, 2017, weeks after the StarNews first reported researchers had discovered GenX chemicals emanating from the Fayetteville Works facility in Wilmington’s finished drinking water. The EPA also wants to know when Chemours became aware that GenX was being released into the environment.
Read more » click here

Update –

Updated consent order requires Chemours to consider GenX in river
Chemours would have to analyze GenX and other chemicals in the Cape Fear River sediment and measure chemicals’ levels at raw water intakes, according to a revised consent order between the chemical giant, the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) and Cape Fear River Watch. In Wilmington, officials and utilities expressed concerns that the original agreement — released Thanksgiving eve — required Chemours to provide water treatment technology to homes around the Fayetteville Works plant while leaving downstream utilities to foot the bill for ongoing contamination. Both the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority (CFPUA) and New Hanover County passed resolutions calling for the order to provide additional protections for downstream residents. According to a document prepared by DEQ, changes to the order include requiring Chemours to provide an “accelerated” plan reducing per- and polyfluoroalykl sbustances (PFAS) contamination in the Cape Fear River, to submit monthly reports to regulators about PFAS emissions at the plant, and to update the corrective plan as new technology becomes available.
Read more » click here


Lockwood Folly Inlet Dredging


Previously reported – December 2018

Corps’ Rule Could Dash Town’s Sand Plan
Sand that Holden Beach has received for years to re-nourish its east-end oceanfront may instead go to a neighboring island, a prospect that caught town officials by surprise and questioning why the sudden change.
Read more » click here


Holden Beach eyes sand from 2019 project to reinforce island’s east end
Holden Beach’s east end could receive sand from a possible Lockwood Folly Inlet project next year.
Read more » click here


Corps approves dredging contract; good news for Oak Island
After removing some of the optional jobs, such as grooming freshly renourished beaches, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has awarded a $3.3-million contract to Southwind Construction Co. for work on area waterways. The bid award is good news for Oak Island, which expects to receive 88,000 cubic yards of sand along an eroded section of the western part of the island near 69th Place West. It is expected to cover about 2,500 feet of beach.
Read more » click here

Holden Beach inlet board recommends pursuing sand project
Holden Beach’s inlet and beach protection board recommended town commissioners pursue a project that could mean sand being placed on the east end of Holden Beach. In an email sent to Town Manager David Hewett, Oak Island Town Manager David Kelly and Brunswick County Manager Ann Hardy, Deputy County Manager Steve Stone said the county received a grant award contract from the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality Division of Water Resources for the Lockwood Folly Navigation Project submitted last summer. The application indicated the county would work to place the resultant beach-quality material, estimated to be in the range of 250,000 cubic yards, on one of the two beaches. The county is seeking feedback from Holden Beach and Oak Island before it pursues the project. Stone said county originally proposed paying 25 percent of the required local share, or $344,338, with the remaining 75 percent, or $1,033,013, to be paid by the town receiving the sand. Stone said DWR staff members are aware the project is unlikely to happen before fall 2019 but extending the period of performance could be granted. He said the county hopes to hear back from both municipalities by early January. In its recommendation, the inlet board raised concerns such as what type of impact the removal of 250,000 cubic yards of sand for the project will have on both Holden Beach’s east end and Oak Island.
Read more » click here

Corps Puts Limits On Dredged Sand Disposal
Getting permission to dump sand in federally maintained dredged material disposal areas may not be entirely impossible, but a nationwide policy heavily restricts access for North Carolina coastal municipalities and businesses that have long relied on the sites. If the Army Corps of Engineers’ Wilmington District office, along with local and state officials, can come up with ways to work around the policy, all indications are that it could come at a hefty price for non-federal users, including beach towns and private marina owners. The policy indicates that while non-federal projects may apply to dispose of material on a Corps-maintained site if the project meets specific requirements, most federal projects are perpetual, and therefore “few” sites will have extra space. Though the Corps’ nationwide guideline is more than a year old – it became effective Feb. 3, 2017 – word of it has gradually spread along the North Carolina coast.
Read more » click here

Update –

USACE dredge boat Murden replaced the Merritt and will be here until February 25th as long as conditions remain favorable. Murden deposits sand nearshore which is more beneficial than the side-caster Merritt, but not as good as putting it on the beach with a pipeline project.  The good news is it is placing the sand off our beach, not Oak Island’s.  That sand is then in “the system” and will eventually append to our beach – not just fall back in the inlet.

USACE Merritt
The Merritt is a side-cast dredge that has two drag arms on each side of the vessel that operators lower into the water. The dredge removes sediment from the bottom and pumps it through a discharge pipe outside of the channel and into the direction of the current. It can dredge to a depth of up to 20 feet. The Merritt is especially suited for maintenance of shallow, un-stabilized inlets where larger hopper dredges cannot operate due to strong currents and ocean environment.

USACE Murden
This vessel will work in the shallow-draft ocean bar channels along the Atlantic Coast.  In addition to removing dredged material from the channel it can transport the material to the downdrift beach and deposit it in the surf zone to nourish sand-starved beaches.


Corrections & Amplifications –

RESOLUTION 19-01
Previously reported – January 2019
RESOLUTION 19-01
RESOLUTION OF TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH AUTHORIZING FILING OF CONDEMNATION ACTIONS TO ACQUIRE PERPETUAL EASEMENTS FOR THE TOWN’S EASTERN REACH SHORE PROTECTION PROJECT

The Town will attempt to acquire easements at the east end of the island by condemnation for future beach strand nourishment projects.

Holden Beach Commissioners OK resolution for shoreline protection project
Holden Beach commissioners approved a resolution to help the town get easements for the town’s shoreline protection project. Following a closed session after their regular Jan. 15 meeting, commissioners passed Resolution 19-01 authorizing the filing of condemnation action to acquire perpetual easements for the town’s Eastern Reach Shore Protection Project. The project requires the town to secure easements applicable to the portion of ocean beaches in front of oceanfront properties, “particularly described as that part of the beach which is seaward toe of the frontal dune or primary dune or the erosion escarpment of the frontal dune or primary dune,” or the easement area, as determined by the North Carolina Division of Coastal Management.  For those who haven’t delivered to the town an executed deed of easement, the resolution says the town is authorized to serve a notice of intent “to enter upon lands and to file eminent domain /condemnation action to acquire easement for beach renourishment project.” In the case of owners not having signed the easement and who have been sent the notice of intent after more than 30 days lapsing since the notice was sent to the owner, the town will file an eminent domain action against the owners to get the needed easement to go forward with the project. Commissioners directed Town Attorney Noel Fox to take the necessary steps to acquire easements on or after Feb. 28.
Read more » click here


Coastal towns to get funding to improve beach, waterfront access
A dozen coastal communities will get more than $1.1 million in grants to improve public access to beaches and waters. According to Governor Roy Cooper, the grants go to towns along the coast from Manteo to Holden Beach. “North Carolina’s coast is one of our greatest treasures and we want it to be accessible to all,” Governor Cooper said. “These grants will help coastal communities welcome more people to enjoy our spectacular beaches and waterways, increasing investment in our state’s economy.” The grants come from the state Division of Coastal Management in the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality. “We want people to be able to enjoy North Carolina’s beautiful coast,” said Michael S. Regan, secretary of the Department of Environmental Quality. “These funds will help make our beaches and waterways more accessible for the benefit of every visitor, as well as the businesses who benefit from their visit.”

Awards will go to the following communities:
.   •
HB received $16,335 for the construction of a dune crossover at 289.5 OBW

“The Public Beach and Coastal Waterfront Access program provides matching funds to local governments in the 20 coastal counties. Governments that receive grants must match them by contributing at least 25 percent toward the project’s cost,” the press release states. Funding for the grant program comes from the North Carolina General Assembly through the state’s Parks and Recreation Trust Fund. Access projects may include walkways, dune crossovers, restrooms, parking areas, piers and related projects. Funds also may be used for land acquisition or urban waterfront revitalization.
Read more » click here


The National Flood Insurance Program
The National Flood Insurance Program aims to reduce the impact of flooding on private and public structures. It does so by providing affordable insurance to property owners and by encouraging communities to adopt and enforce floodplain management regulations. These efforts help mitigate the effects of flooding on new and improved structures. Overall, the program reduces the socio-economic impact of disasters by promoting the purchase and retention of general risk insurance, but also of flood insurance, specifically.
Read more » click here

Previously reported – December 2018

National Flood Insurance Program: Reauthorization
Congress must periodically renew the NFIP’s statutory authority to operate. On July 31, 2018, the President signed legislation passed by Congress that extends the National Flood Insurance Program’s (NFIP’s) authorization to November 30, 2018. Congress must now reauthorize the NFIP by no later than 11:59 pm on May 31, 2019.

FEMA and Congress have never failed to honor the flood insurance contracts in place with NFIP policyholders. Should the NFIP’s authorization lapse, FEMA would still have authority to ensure the payment of valid claims with available funds. However, FEMA would stop selling and renewing policies for millions of properties in communities across the nation. Nationwide, the National Association of Realtors estimates that a lapse might impact approximately 40,000 home sale closings per month.

NFIP reauthorization is an opportunity for Congress to take bold steps to reduce the complexity of the program and strengthen the NFIP’s financial framework so that the program can continue helping individuals and communities take the critical step of securing flood insurance. The level of damage from the 2017 hurricanes makes it abundantly clear that FEMA needs a holistic plan to ready the Nation for managing the cost of catastrophic flooding under the NFIP.
Read more » click here

FEMA resumes selling,
renewing flood insurance policies amid shutdown
Agency rescinds previous decision to not sell or renew policies
Read more » click here

Update –

Private Flood Insurance Gets Boost from Regulators
Flood insurance policies not backed by the government currently represent less than 5% of the residential market
The number of flood insurance policies underwritten by private companies could triple under a new federal rule that would require mortgage lenders to accept both private and government-backed policies.

The rule, approved by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and Office of the Comptroller of the Currency late last week, is aimed at boosting the availability of private flood insurance in flood zones, a market dominated by a multibillion-dollar government program. It could usher in private flood insurance for hundreds of thousands of residential properties in those areas, according to government estimates. “This ruling has the potential to open up the private insurance market,” said Michael Barry, a spokesman at the industry-funded Insurance Information Institute. He said the effect was likely to be concentrated in Florida, Louisiana and Texas, where most of the nation’s flood insurance policies are held.

The private-sector insurance industry historically has been reluctant to write flood insurance because of the potential for large losses, but interest has grown in recent years with the improvement of mapping and modeling technologies. Private flood insurance policies currently represent less than 5% of the residential market, according to government and academic research. Most private flood insurance is for commercial and more expensive residential properties that need coverage above the federal program’s $250,000 limit.

The public program had more than five million policies outstanding and $1.3 trillion in potential claims as of July 2018. It is operated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. “If the private market can take care of it, that’s just more sustainable for taxpayers and for society in general,” said R.J. Lehmann, a senior fellow at the R Street Institute, a libertarian policy organization that has argued for shrinking the government flood insurance program.

The regulation is set to go into effect in July, as the next hurricane season gets under way. It stems from a provision in a 2012 flood insurance law that sought to partially address financial pressures on the government’s flood insurance program, which is deeply in debt from record disaster payouts in recent years and limitations on its ability to increase premiums.

Congress has for years debated how to fix the National Flood Insurance Program, created about 50 years ago because private insurers were unwilling to risk catastrophic flood losses. Lawmakers, divided based on the prevalence of floods in their districts, have approved only partial solutions such as premium increases or debt forgiveness for the government program. The government, for instance, wrote off $16 billion in debt for the federal program in 2017 following claims made in the aftermath of hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria.

Congress must reauthorize the federal insurance program this year. It is expected to discuss additional ways to overhaul the federal program, such as redrawing the maps that dictate where coverage is required and making it financially stable.

Opponents of opening up the flood insurance market argue private insurers could cherry-pick safer properties that could be cheaper to insure, saddling the public program with riskier ones. And some lawmakers, including Sen. Robert Menendez (D., N.J.), have called for increasing controls over the private flood insurance sector.

The rule would require lenders to accept private flood insurance policies that have coverage at least as comprehensive as what is offered by the federal program. Banks also could allow policies that aren’t as comprehensive as government flood insurance, a move backed by the insurance industry but opposed by some consumer advocates because it could concentrate riskier insurance policies in the federal plan.

Narrower coverage will “appeal more to lower risk people and then leave the National Flood Insurance Program principally with higher risk people,” said Daniel Schwarz, a professor at University of Minnesota Law School. Three other regulators, including the Federal Reserve, must still approve the rule.
Read more » click here


Odds & Ends

Holden Beach Renourishment Association
Planting & Fertilization Efforts
The Holden Beach Renourishment Association is funding the installation of approximately 142,000 American Beach Grass plants to be installed by Coastal Transplants, primarily in the Central Reach Project area. In addition, the project includes fertilization of the entire beach from the east end to the escarpment on the west end in three applications, each 30 days apart. New plants will be skipped in the first two applications to protect the roots. Coastal Transplants anticipates the entire project should be completed by May. Thank you to Holden Beach Renourishment Association members, both past and present.


Could a prepared food tax help Brunswick maintain its beaches?
Bill would allow proceeds from new tax to be used on town beach nourishment, infrastructure projects
Responding, he said, to a continuing ask from Oak Island and Southport, state Rep. Frank Iler, R-Brunswick, — along with Rep. Deb Butler, D-New Hanover, who also represents northeastern Brunswick County — has reintroduced a bill that would allow municipalities to impose an additional tax on prepared foods. The tax, which wouldn’t apply to convenience stores or grocery stores nor even the deli meals prepared in both, would amount to 0.5 cents per dollar. Revenue from such a tax, should a town or city approve its implementation, would be geared for beach nourishment or infrastructure projects, Iler said this week. Given the two towns asking for permission to possibly impose the new tax, beach and waterfront projects are a top priority. But given that inland Shallotte has also expressed interest, Iler said, other infrastructure investment may also be on the minds of municipal officials. “At the request of the county,” Iler said — Brunswick County — “we removed them from the bill. It will be by a vote of local municipal boards whether to impose this tax, by resolution or referendum. This does not impose a tax, it just allows municipalities to impose one and allows the people to vote,” directly or indirectly, he said. “We have 19 municipalities in my district and Deb Butler’s district, and they can choose to impose this or not. It amounts to 10 cents on a $20 tab in a restaurant. Someone asked me, ‘what about a $1,000 catering bill?’ Well, it’s $10.” This is not a targeted tourist-related bill, Iler said of House Bill 17. Well, maybe it is, he mused. Tourists come and enjoy our beaches and the infrastructure that supports them. Perhaps they should pay part of the costs of maintaining them both. “These pretty beaches don’t happen by accident,” Iler said. “It takes effort to keep them looking so good.”
Read more » click here


HOLDEN BEACH LAND USE PLAN / PUBLIC INPUT MEETING
A public input meeting will be held on Thursday, February 7th at 7:00 p.m. in the Town Hall Public Assembly. This meeting is held as part of the land use planning process for the Town of Holden Beach. Holden Beach’s Land Use Plan provides guidance to local decision-makers to achieve the long-term vision for the community. This allows local decision makers to be proactive rather than reactive and helps maintain Holden Beach as one of the finest family-oriented beaches on the East Coast of the United States. The meeting is structured to be engaging and informative.

Town’s Land Use Plan

Holden Beach residents give input for updated land use plan
Holden Beach residents at a Feb. 7 meeting with the Cape Fear Council of Governments (CFCOG) were able to give input on the town’s developing land use plan. Town commissioners voted in July to approve an agreement between the town and the CFCOG for a Coastal Area Management Act (CAMA) land use plan update. A land use plan is an official document containing goals, policies, analyses and maps that serves as a community’s blueprint for growth, Wes MacLeod, senior regional planner with CFCOG, told attendees at the special meeting, providing them with some of the data about the town already collected for the land use plan.

MacLeod provided history on the town’s population growth, which shows a decrease of more than 200 residents from the year 2000, with 787 permanent town residents, to 575 permanent residents in 2010. As of 2016 the number of permanent Holden Beach residents was 633. It’s estimated that the population will grow to 708 in 2020, 783 in 2025, 859 in 2030, 935 in 2035, 1,016 in 2040 and 1,095 by 2046. The median age for the town is 61.4, compared to the county’s median age of 50.9, and the state’s median age of 38.3. The majority of those living in Holden Beach are considered Baby Boomers (ages 55 to 74), making up 56.35 percent of the town. For the seasonal population, the most recent data from 2016 showed the peak seasonal overnight population estimate for Holden Beach at 16,811 people. The median value of owner-occupied housing in Holden Beach as of 2016 was $406,000.

MacLeod also showed information from the community survey update. He said CFCOG received 891 responses, including 810 property owner responses and 81 non-resident responses, including visitors and off-island residents. The survey showed Holden Beach residents when it comes to new private development desires, would most like to see more entertainment on the island like restaurants and theaters, low-density single-family residences and small businesses that serve the needs of residents. Survey takers said they consider the most important roles for the town to play in influencing the character of development on Holden Beach to be managing the density and intensity of new development by regulating the size and layout of buildings, protecting the beach and encouraging continued coastal storm damage reduction and beach protection and retaining and enhancing the community’s appearance through landscaping, signs, lighting and architectural standards. They also said coastal storm damage reduction, density development and environmental protections are the most important growth and development issues facing Holden Beach. When it comes to transportation issues, survey takers said the most important ones are maintenance of the town’s existing roadways, parking availability/public access congestion and roadway drainage. When asked to share their favorite things about Holden Beach, the most common responses from survey takers were its lack of commercial development, its uncrowded and clean beaches, its family-friendly atmosphere, its natural resources including the beaches and marshes, it’s quiet, off-season “solitude’ and the fact that the town is mostly made up of single-family houses.

Attendees were then given a brainstorming exercise. MacLeod wrote down on large pieces of paper what those at the meeting thought were the town’s most important assets, important issues and their desires for the future in Holden Beach. Attendees were then given dots to place next to the two of those they considered the most important. Preliminary results showed attendees saw the most important assets as the beach, the lack of commercial development, Lockwood Folly and the marshes and wetlands. The most important issues appeared to be rising sea levels, offshore drilling and stormwater. As for desires for the town, the most popular answers were sustainable growth, improving the causeway’s appearance and a fully maintained and marked inlet. MacLeod said the answers would be tallied by CFCOG to be used in the land use plan.
Read more » click here


 

Brunswick County recently announced

that it will reappraise real property

as of January 1, 2019.

Brunswick County recently announced t will
reappraise real property as
Reappraisal is a process in which all real estate values are assessed at their market value as of a specific date. The purpose of a Reappraisal is to provide equalization among all types of properties. North Carolina General Statutes require each county to conduct a Reappraisal at least once every eight years. Brunswick County conducts a Reappraisal every four year. The last Reappraisal was effective January 1, 2015.

The Board of Commissioners will hold a Special Called Meeting at 3:00 p.m. on Thursday, August 30, 2018 in the Commissioners Chambers located in the David R. Sandifer Administration Building, 30 Government Center Drive, NE, Bolivia, NC.

The purpose of the meeting is to adopt the 2019 reappraisal Schedule of Values. A copy of the Schedule is available to the public in the office of the Brunswick County Tax Assessor, Brunswick County Government Center, 30 Government Center Drive NE, Bolivia, NC from 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Monday thru Friday, and on the County’s website. Click here for more information from the Brunswick County’s FAQ web page on this topic.

Update –

Revaluation: new property values to be mailed next week
Brunswick County’s once-every-four-years revaluation of property values – delayed slightly like nearly everything else by Hurricane Florence – enters its next phase this week, when municipalities will receive notice of the new numbers. Brunswick County Tax Administrator Jeff Niebauer said overall real property values were up an average of 11.9-percent countywide to $25.6-billion. That number does not include churches, hospitals, schools or other exempt properties, nor does it include personal property, such as aircraft or manufactured housing. It does include growth and new construction since the last study four years ago. To increase revenue, the county and towns could choose to adopt the same tax rate and thus realize a boost in tax receipts. Or, they could adopt a “revenue-neutral” rate that would be slightly lower than the current year but bring in roughly the same amount of taxes. The tax office expects to mail notices to individual property owners by February 25. The values assigned this year will be applied to tax bills for fiscal 2019-2020, which begins July 1, 2019. Those bills are due September 1 and are considered late after January 5, 2020.
Read more » click here


This & That


Happy Birthday – we just celebrated the Town’s 50th birthday

Town of Holden Beach officially established on February 14, 1969


 


CodeRED

Brunswick County

Emergency Communications Network


.
Do you want to have the latest information about warnings in our area? Sign up for emergency notices and critical community alerts.  When one takes place, Brunswick County utilizes a mass notification system to call, text and email individuals with important information. CodeRED is a lifesaving notification system that keeps residents informed of emergencies near them.

Brunswick County strongly encourages residents to enroll to receive alerts. The CodeRED system will allow you to manage your own information and update your contact information on your own. This information is private and is not sold or shared with outside parties. Please take a moment to sign up for alerts by clicking here so you can stay safe.



Carolina Bays Parkway Extension

 

The N.C. Department of Transportation and the S.C. Department of Transportation plan to extend Carolina Bays Parkway (S.C. 31) from S.C. 9 in Horry County, S.C., across the North Carolina state line to U.S. 17 in Brunswick County. The project is expected to involve the construction of a multi-lane expressway and may involve both existing roadways and areas on new location.

SCDOT State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) Project P029554 would extend Carolina Bays Parkway from its current terminus at S.C. 9 in Horry County to the North Carolina state line. NCDOT STIP Project R-5876 would extend Carolina Bays Parkway from the state line to U.S. 17 Shallotte Bypass in Brunswick County. Carolina Bays Parkway Extension is anticipated to involve the construction of a multilane, full control of access freeway, with part on new location. Full control of access means that access to Carolina Bays Parkway will only be provided via ramps and interchanges. Bridges will be installed at some cross streets and no driveway connections will be allowed.
Read more » click here

Carolina Bays, the $500 million Brunswick County to South Carolina highway project, begins public process
An over half-billion dollar highway project is being designed to streamline transportation between North and South Carolina. The Carolina Bays Parkway Extension would connect S.C. 31 directly to Highway 17 in Brunswick County. Right now, S.C. 31 — Carolina Bays Parkway — runs inland and parallel to Highway 17 in South Carolina along the Myrtle Beach metropolitan area. The 24-mile long parkway ends just 4.5 miles short of the border in South Carolina. Traffic connects S.C. 31 to Highway 17 through a 1.5-mile terminus along S.C. 9. The over half-billion dollar project instead proposes to extend S.C. 31 where it drops off, and connect it to Highway 17 in Brunswick County.
Read more » click here


Factoid That May Interest Only Me –

Oceans Are Warming Faster Than Predicted
Earth’s seas are absorbing excess heat 40 percent faster than previous estimates
Up to 90 percent of the warming caused by human carbon emissions is absorbed by the world’s oceans, scientists estimate. And researchers increasingly agree that the oceans are warming faster than previously thought. Multiple studies in the past few years have found that previous estimates from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change may be too low. A new review of the research, published yesterday in Science, concludes that “multiple lines of evidence from four independent groups thus now suggest a stronger observed [ocean heat content] warming.”

Taken together, the research suggests that the oceans are heating up about 40 percent faster than previously estimated by the IPCC. Since the 1950s, studies generally suggest that the oceans have been absorbing at least 10 times as much energy annually, measured in joules, as humans consume worldwide in a year.
Read more » click here

Ocean Warming Is Accelerating Faster Than Thought,
New Research Finds
Scientists say the world’s oceans are warming far more quickly than previously thought, a finding with dire implications for climate change because almost all the excess heat absorbed by the planet ends up stored in their waters.
Read more » click here

The oceans are warming faster than we thought,
and scientists suggest we brace for impact
The oceans are warming faster than climate reports have suggested, according to a new synthesis of temperature observations published this week. The most recent report from the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change made what turned out to be a very conservative estimate of rise in ocean temperature, and scientists are advising us to adjust our expectations.

“The numbers are coming in 40 to 50 percent [warmer] than the last IPCC report,” said Kevin Trenberth, a climate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and an author on the report, published in Science Magazine on Thursday. Furthermore, Trenberth said, “2018 will be the warmest year on record in the oceans” as 2017 was and 2016 before that. Oceans cover 70 percent of the globe and absorb 93 percent of the planet’s extra heat from climate change. They are responsible for spawning disasters like hurricanes Florence and Maria and generating torrential rainfall via meteorological processes with names like “atmospheric river” and “Pineapple Express.”
Read more » click here

Ice loss from Antarctica has sextupled since the 1970’s
Antarctic glaciers have been melting at an accelerating pace over the past four decades thanks to an influx of warm ocean water — a startling new finding that researchers say could mean sea levels are poised to rise more quickly than predicted in coming decades. The Antarctic lost 40 billion tons of melting ice to the ocean each year from 1979 to 1989. That figure rose to 252 billion tons lost per year beginning in 2009, according to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. That means the region is losing six times as much ice as it was four decades ago, an unprecedented pace in the era of modern measurements. (It takes about 360 billion tons of ice to produce one millimeter of global sea-level rise.)
Read more » click here

It’s Official: 2018 Was the Fourth Warmest Year on Record
NASA scientists announced Wednesday that the Earth’s average surface temperature in 2018 was the fourth highest in nearly 140 years of record-keeping and a continuation of an unmistakable warming trend. The data means that the five warmest years in recorded history have been the last five, and that 18 of the 19 warmest years have occurred since 2001. The quickly rising temperatures over the past two decades cap a much longer warming trend documented by researchers and correspond with the scientific consensus that climate change is caused by human activity. “We’re no longer talking about a situation where global warming is something in the future,” said Gavin A. Schmidt, director of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies, the NASA group that conducted the analysis. “It’s here. It’s now.” While this planet has seen hotter days in prehistoric times, and colder ones in the modern era, what sets recent warming apart in the sweep of geologic time is the relatively sudden rise in temperatures and its clear correlation with increasing levels of greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide and methane produced by human activity.
Read more » click here

2018 was fourth-hottest year on record, NASA says
World data shows “global warming shows no sign of slowing down or stopping.”
Read more » click here

Today’s Earth looks a lot like it did 115,000 years ago.
All we’re missing is massive sea level rise.
New research suggests the planet is already paralleling the most recent major warm period in its past. Now the only question is how fast Antarctica could collapse.
Read more » click here


Things I Think I Think –

Dining #2Eating out is one of the great little joys of life.

Restaurant Review:
Dinner Club visits a new restaurant once a month. Ratings reflect the reviewer’s reaction to food, ambience and service, with price taken into consideration.

///// December 2018
Name:               Joe’s Bar & Grill    
Cuisine:           American
Location:        810 Conway Street, N Myrtle Beach, SC
Contact:          843.272.4666 / http://www.joesbarandgrillonline.com/

Food:                Average / Very Good / Excellent / Exceptional
Service:           Efficient / Proficient / Professional / Expert
Ambience:      Drab / Plain / Distinct / Elegant
Cost:                 Inexpensive <=17 / Moderate <=22 / Expensive <=27 / Exorbitant <=40
Rating:            Two Stars
Joe’s Bar & Grill has been a staple of North Myrtle Beach for over 30 years, it is located just across from the Alabama Theatre. Joe’s is a little hideaway place, a local’s favorite. It serves upscale fare in a casual setting, think fishing / hunting lodge rustic grace, where the ambiance is laid-back. It’s a bi-level eatery with seating either in the main dining room or out on the screened-in porch both with panoramic views of the saltwater marsh. The Raccoon Cove Deck Bar is outside with a fireplace where the raccoons entertain the guests. Joe’s is a little pricey but is still a pretty good value.


3 Wilmington restaurants sold to Raleigh-based group
Three prominent Wilmington restaurants have been sold to a Raleigh-based restaurant group. Urban Food Group (UFG), owned by Kevin and Stacey Jennings, purchased Brasserie du Soleil, Osteria Cicchetti, and Boca Bay, as the company marks its first expansion into the Port City. Ash Aziz, the former owner of the trio of restaurants and head of Circa Restaurant Group, will retain ownership of his other Wilmington-based eateries: Pizzeria Il Forno, Circa 1922, Junction 421, and a new concept planned for River Place in downtown.
Read more » click here


How to Complain at a Restaurant? Just Ask Our Critic
Our restaurant critic, Pete Wells, explains why bringing your gripes to the management instead of anonymously torching the place online will make everybody happier.
Read more » click here


Book Review:
Read several books from The New York Times best sellers fiction list monthly
Selection represents this month’s pick of the litter
/////

THE LAST TIME I LIED by Riley Sager
The psychological suspense thriller follows a young woman as she returns to her childhood summer camp to uncover the truth about a tragedy that happened there fifteen years ago. Emma has revisited this ordeal again and again through her work as a painter.  She is determined to uncover the fate of the other three girls in her cabin that disappeared one night. This story is full of twists and turns, with chapters alternating between the past and the present. And in the end, the author delivers an unpredictable and utterly shocking conclusion.


 HBPOIN / Lou’s Views
.       
• Gather and disseminate information
.        • Identify the issues and determine how they affect you

.        • Act as a watchdog
.        • Grass roots monthly newsletter since 2008

https://lousviews.com/

01 – Town Meeting

Lou’s Views

“Unofficial” Minutes & Comments


BOC’s Special Meeting 01/15/19

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet
For more information
» click here

1. Interviews for the Audit Committee

Two new applicants Woody Tyner and Anthony Chavonne


BOC’s Special Meeting 01/16/19

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet
For more information
» click here

1. Discussion and Possible Action on Setting 2019 Board of Commissioners’ Objectives with Town Management


BOC’s Regular Meeting 01/15/19

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet
For more information
» click here


1. Public Comments on Agenda Items

There were no comments


2. Receipt of Inlet and Beach Protection Board Report – Commissioner Freer

Agenda Packet –
December Meeting Update
The Inlet and Beach Protection Board {IBPB) met December 20 and the following issues and topics were addressed:

Status of the Beach and Inlets:  Staff provided an overview of conditions and issues relative to the beach strand and inlets. The Board was updated on the LFI situation.

Collaboration with UNCW: Member Thomas gave an update on his meeting with UNCW. The next step is to have a representative from UNCW attend a meeting of the IBPB.

Comprehensive long-Term Plan: A working framework for the long-term plan was discussed and agreed upon.  Sample reports were reviewed and discussed. A facilitator was also discussed, and that recommendation will be forwarded on.

Budget Items for FY 19-20: As “budget season” is fast approaching, Board Members discussed projects and items they would like to see included in the upcoming budget. Identified items such as additional plantings and mats will be researched as possible recommendations for the budget.

Engagement with other Groups: The Town of Holden Beach and the IBPB interface with many groups and projects/efforts. In order to increase awareness and efficiency, members volunteered to take responsibility for keeping the rest of the group updated.

Community Engagement Newsletter: To meet the goal of serving as a link to the community as specified in the establishing ordinance, the first draft of a regular (possibly quarterly) community newsletter was reviewed and will be distributed.

Meetings: Members of the Board, staff, and the BOC attended the quarterly MOA meeting in New Bern on December 19 in person and via webinar. Upcoming beach and inlet related meetings were discussed.

Vegetation: Steve Mercer will be scheduled to attend an IBPB meeting and a field trip to his nursery will be scheduled in the spring.

Previously reported –
Ordinance 18-02 established the Inlet and Beach Protection Board
The Ordinance requires a written report from this Board

Update –
No issues, accepted report


3. Police Report – Detective Jeremy Dixon

Police Patch
So far so good, it’s been fairly quiet
We are not experiencing any major crime wave at the moment

 

Personnel Announcements
Chief Layne has officially announced his retirement effective 1 April 2019
Detective Dixon is formally designated “Chief in Waiting”
Officer Colten Robinson has joined the Police Department


Reminder that we all serve as the eyes and ears for law enforcement.
If you know something, hear something, or see something –
call 911 and let police deal with it.


Neighborhood Watch

  • Need to look out for each other and report any suspicious activity
  • Call 911 if you see or hear anything suspicious
  • Fill out Keep Check Request Form if you will be out of town
  • Submit completed Property Registration Form
  • Pickup copy of Protecting Your Home

Crime prevention 101 – Don’t make it easy for them
. a) Don’t leave vehicles unlocked
. b)
Don’t leave valuables in your vehicles
. c)
Lock your doors & windows – house, garage, storage areas and sheds

Keep Check Request Form
. a) Complete the form and return it to the Police Department
. b)
Officers check your property in your absence

Property Registration Form
. a) Record of items in your home that have a value of over $100
. b)
Complete the form and return it to the Police Department


4. Discussion and Possible Action – Construction Management Services of the Vacuum Sewer System #4 Upgrade Status Report – Public Works Director Clemmons

Previously reported – December 2017
McGill and Associates were commissioned to perform a Sewer Study to evaluate sewer system vulnerability reducing measures. A fiscal year 2017-2018 budget appropriation of $1,413,000 was made to accommodate total programmatic expenses of Lift Station #4 improvements. Green Engineering firm was awarded the $158,000 contract for Sewer System #4 upgrade. Green Engineering will provide all engineering services required to construct a vulnerability reducing structure of Lift Station #4.

Previously reported –
April 2018
Four (4) meetings have been held between staff and the engineering firm to date. The final plans were delivered to the Town and have been reviewed and approved by the Building Inspector. Deliverables – Timeline has been revised. Buildings were designed in the same style as Town Hall. We are currently on schedule, but Chris cautioned that it was still early in the game. The Board requested monthly updates, reporting on whether we remained on schedule and within budget.

Previously reported –
May 2018
We’ve had a slight setback, we did not receive the three (3) bids required to move forward. Officially we accepted no bids, the two bids submitted will be held and opened upon the completion of the second go round. Chris was a little surprised and disappointed since their appeared to be a lot of interest when they held meeting with vendors. We will need to start the bid process over. The protocols on the second bid process do not require the three bids but the caveat is we can only consider quality bids.

Previously reported –
June 2018
BOC’s SPECIAL MEETING / May 23, 2018
Approved award of the Lift Station #4 upgrade contract to T.A. Loving Company in the amount of $1,205,000

Total project cost went from $1,413,000 to $1,695,700 or a $282,700 difference
Contingency funds were reduced from $157,400 to $52,480 or a $104,920 difference
Bottomline, the project cost just went up $387,620 ($282,700 + $104,920) or @27% (Yikes!)

A pre-construction meeting is scheduled for June 28th
We should have a tentative construction start date then

Previously reported –
July 2018
A pre-construction meeting was held on June 28th
The contractor was given notice to proceed
Mobilization is scheduled for the first week of August
Concerns:
. 1) Time to get materials – delay waiting for foundation steel
. 2)
Storm Season

Previously reported –
August 2018
Reviewed progress to date, despite the rain they are still on schedule, gave some tentative project timelines. It’s all good!

Previously reported –
October 2018
Making good progress, despite the two storm events they are still on track to complete project on schedule.

Previously reported – November 2018
Town hired Green Engineering for construction management services. Leo Green gave a brief status report. It’s all good, we are still on budget and on schedule. Project tentative completion date is the middle of January well before the tourist season begins. Leo meets with the town staff monthly to discuss any issues and keep everyone informed about the status of the project. Building Inspections Director Evans gave them two thumbs up for the work that has been done so far; really high praise coming from Timbo.

Previously reported – December 2018
Tentative startup date is now January 15th, station will be fully operational after that date. Expectation is that they should have everything wrapped up by March of 2019.

Update –
They are making progress daily and are attempting to tie up any loose ends. Airvac is scheduled to be on site this week in order to initiate the integration and changeover of the upgraded sewer lift station machinery and equipment.


5. Discussion and Possible Nomination of a Board of Commissioners Member to Serve as the Audit Committee Chair – Town Clerk Finnell

Previously reported – January 2018
The Board of Commissioners has found that establishment of an Audit Committee would improve the ability of the Board of Commissioners to perform its fiscal oversight function.

 §30.26 AUDIT COMMITTEE OF THE BOC
There is hereby established an Audit Committee of the BOC, which shall be comprised of: A Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee, who shall be a member of the Board of Commissioners; and not fewer than two nor more than four Public Members, as determined by the BOC at the first regular meeting in January. The Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee and each of the Public Members shall have a normal term of one year, and all shall serve at the pleasure of the BOC. The Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee shall be elected by the BOC at the first regular meeting in January.

Update –
John Fletcher was renominated to retain the Chair for another year.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


6. Discussion and Possible Nomination of Members to Serve on the Audit Committee – Town Clerk Finnell

Agenda Packet –
APPOINTMENT, TERMS
The Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee shall be elected by the BOC at the first regular meeting in January. The Chairman of the Audit Committee shall make a recommendation to the Board of Commissioners on who shall serve as the Public Members. The Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee, an elected Commissioner, and each of the Public Members shall have a normal term of one year and shall serve at the pleasure of the BOC.


Ron Skubic, Mark Fleischhauer and Tom Myers, current members of the Audit Committee, are willing to serve another term. I have included copies of their resumes in the Special Meeting Packet. Per existing practice, the members currently serving on a committee or board do not need to be interviewed again so I have not scheduled interviews for these members. The fourth current member, Ben Byrnside does not want to serve another term.

There are two new applicants for the Audit Committee, Woody Tyner and Anthony Chavonne. Both applicants are scheduled to be interviewed at the Special Meeting scheduled for 6:45p.m. on January 15, 2019.

Update –
Ron Skubic and Ben Byrnside both stepped down. That left four candidates to fill the four positions. Mark Fleischhauer and Tom Myers, current members of the Audit Committee, will be joined by the two new applicants Woody Tyner and Anthony Chavonne.  

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


7. Discussion and Possible Approval of Ordinance 19-01, An Ordinance Amending The Holden Beach Code of Ordinances Chapter 151: Building and Housing Regulations (Impact Fees) – Planning Director Evans

Agenda Packet –
Remove Sections 151.65, 151.66, 151.67, 151.68, 151.69, 151.71, 151.72, 151.73, 151.74, 151.75 and 151.99 from Chapter 151: Building and Housing Regulations.

 §151.65  APPLICATION OF PROVISIONS.
 §151.66  PERSONS RESPONSIBLE FOR FEES; EXCEPTIONS.
 §151.67  IMPOSITION.
 §151.68  SEWER AND STORMWATER DRAINAGE FUND.
 §151.69  IMPACT FEE SCHEDULE.
 §151.71  REFUNDS; APPEAL PROCEDURE.
 §151.72  EFFECT OF FEE ON ZONING AND SUBDIVISION REGULATIONS.
 §151.73  REVIEW OF FEE SCHEDULE AND FEE COLLECTION.
 §151.74  CREDITS.
 §151.75  LIBERAL CONSTRUCTION.
 §151.99  PENALTY.

Update –

GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF NORTH CAROLINA / SESSION LAW 2018-34
For more information » click here

According to Timbo session law 2018-34 prohibited us from charging impact fees. Since our ordinance no longer complies with the law it needs to be removed. Basically, he requested that they redact that section of our ordinances.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


8. Planning & Zoning Board Report on Requested Ordinance Change for Cargo Lifts – Vicki Myers, P&Z Chair 

Previously reported – July 2018
Agenda Packet –
Board of Adjustment Letter
Over the past few years, the BOA has been receiving requests, for variances, as it relates to “Cargo Lifts”. The requests are coming from older houses that already violate the 25′ setback but are still allowed to build outside staircases and HVAC platforms. Today, Larry Blume made a motion to ask the BOC to consider changing the ordinance to add Cargo Lifts in ordinance 157.060 (D)(C3) and 157.060 (E) (2) (b).

This change will allow the building inspector to handle these requests, via, the permitting process, thus saving the home owner the expense of applying for a variance.

Heather
The Board of Adjustment is requesting an amendment to the Town’s Code of Ordinances. They would like the Board to consider amending Section 157.060, Residential Districts to allow the building inspector to handle requests relating to cargo lifts via the permitting process.

If the Board would like to move forward with the Board of Adjustment’s request, staff will work with the Town Attorney to draft an ordinance for the Board’s consideration at an upcoming meeting.

Planning Director Evans explained that the current process creates an undue burden for the homeowner of both time and money. So far, every request submitted has been approved. The first step to make the requested change is to send it to the Planning & Zoning Board.

Agenda Packet – January
At the July meeting of the Board of Commissioners, the Planning and Zoning Board was directed to consider amending the Town’s Code of Ordinances, Section 157.060 to “allow the Building Inspector to handle requests relating to cargo lifts via the permitting process.”

After research by Town Staff and discussion, the P&Z Board voted to recommend leaving the ordinance as it is written.

•  Staff feels that there is no reason to change the ordinance

The P&Z Board feels that setbacks should be protected, and exceptions should only be made in cases of hardship where there are no other alternatives. This is the role of the Board of Adjustment and we feel they should continue to make these decisions on a case-by-case basis. By continuing this practice a precedent will not be set allowing encroachment into the setbacks, as each case is decided on an individual basis.

According to the Building Inspector’s records, only four cargo lift cases have gone to Board of Adjustment in the past nine years, or 5% of all permits for cargo lifts. We do not feel this is overly burdensome for Board of Adjustment.

In addition, the proposed change does not conform to the adopted CAMA Land Use Plan

Update –
Both the Planning and Zoning Board and the Town Staff recommended leaving the ordinance as it is written.

No decision was made – No action taken

Talk about mixed signals. In July the Planning and Inspections Director Evans submits request claiming that the current process creates an undue burden for the homeowner of both time and money. Now just six (6) months later he says that only four cargo lift cases have gone to Board of Adjustment in the past nine years, so that there is no reason to change the ordinance. The Town Staff recommended leaving the ordinance as it is written. So, which is it?  


9. Discussion and Possible Approval of Proclamation Recognizing the Town of Holden Beach’s 50th Anniversary of Incorporation – Assistant Town Manager Ferguson

Agenda Packet –
PROCLAMATION
CELEBRATING THE 50th ANNIVERSARY OF THE INCORPORATION OF THE TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach was first incorporated on February 14,1969 and 2019 marks the 50th anniversary with an array of special events planned; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach honors the hard work of its early residents and volunteers who loved their community and organized the incorporation effort; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach marks its 50th anniversary by celebrating its citizens, volunteers, elected officials and staff who strive to preserve and enhance the community; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach anticipates a future that continues to appreciate the beauty of its shoreline, the livability of the community, the appeals a tourist destination, the moniker of the “Family Beach”, and the active and involved citizens; and

WHEREAS, the Town of Holden Beach dedicates 2019 as a year of community wide celebration to honor our past, celebrate our present and embrace our future.

NOW THEREFORE, the Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach, do hereby proclaim 2019 as a year of celebration of the Town of Holden Beach’s 50th Anniversary, and urge all citizens to join in this celebration.

Update –
Town has a number of activities scheduled to commemorate our 50th anniversary.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


10. Discussion and Possible Action to Accept Budget Schedule –
Commissioner Freer

Agenda Packet –
Budget Schedule
January          Develop Goals
January          Canal Working Group
.                        Input from Town Boards – BIPB, Parks and Rec, etc.
February        Department Input to Finance Director
March             BOC Budget Workshops
.                        BOC refine goals
.                       
Revenue & Expenses, review by fund
                      
General Fund Revenues & Expenses, etc.
April 1             Draft Budget Message delivered by Finance Director
Mid-April       Budget Message Workshop – make budget adjustments as needed
May 1              Budget Message Final
Mid-May         Optional BOC changes if needed
June 1              Public Hearing
June 15            Adopt Budget
July 1               Budget goes into effect

Local governments must balance their budget by a combination of the following:
    1) Raising taxes
.     2)
Cutting spending
.     3) Operating more efficiently

Ensuring that government commitments are in line with available resources is an essential element of good governance.

The Town Manager’s proposed budget is due by June 1st
Commissioners must adopt budget no later than June 30th for the next fiscal year
Adopting the annual budget is a primary responsibility of the Board.

Previously reported – December 2018
Budget Meeting Schedule / 2018
16 January                              BOC’s Workshop Goals & Objectives / Capital Programs
19 January                              BOC’s Workshop Goals & Objectives
23 February                            Canal Dredging Working Group
9 March                                   Departments Input to Manager
6 April                                      BOC’s Workshop Revenues
13 April                                    BOC’s Workshop Expenses
31 May                                     Budget Message
13 June                                     Public Hearing
19 June                                     Regular BOC’s Meeting
30 June                                     Budget adopted (No Later Than)

This is what I’d like to see the budget process look like starting in January –
Monthly Meetings / Workshops
Board Goals
Review Capital Improvement Plan
Staff presentations – wants / needs / revenue streams / cost cutting measures
Review Towns current level of services provided – change /add / delete
Review staffing and compensation package
Line by line review of the budget
Appropriate funds for the following:
.         •
Beach Nourishment
.         • Dredging
.         • Infrastructure Reserves – Water System / Sewer System / Roads & Sidewalks

Update –
Proposal was sort of a guideline as to the time frame that they would like to see this happen. Town Manager charged with establishing an actual schedule based on everyone’s availability. Once again, the goal is to avoid the annual rush at the end to get things done.

In 2018 we started the budget process in January. The request was made to move everything up and start the process earlier. However, the Budget schedule last year wasn’t moved up in any meaningful way. The Board is still not really working on the budget until the eleventh hour. I am disappointed that we are only now tentatively establishing the budget meeting schedule. The budget process has been an abject disappointment so far.


11. Follow-up and Review of Poyner Spruill Final Contract/ Agreement – Commissioner Butler

Previously reported – October 2018
It has been the Mayor’s position that we need to hire a professional consulting firm because we need representation on multiple topics at the local, state and national levels of government.

McIntyre did a brief recap of presentation that was made earlier in the day on what they can do for us. The consensus appeared to be that we need someone to speak on our behalf and they can make it happen.

Questions that remained to be answered are as follows:
. 1)
What are we going to get?
. 2)
How much will it cost?

Agenda Packet – November
Scope of Engagement
We have agreed to advise and assist you with governmental matters and legal issues that arise and the Client hereby engages Poyner Spruill LLP to perform the following services in accordance with the terms and conditions set forth in this Agreement: assisting with the Client’s efforts to secure sufficient federal funding and timely regulatory and project management for federal shore protection projects located at Holden Beach, North Carolina, as more particularly described and listed and incorporated herein by reference in Exhibit A, which is attached. The Client acknowledges and agrees that Poyner Spruill LLP does not have control over third party decision makers, and, that Poyner Spruill makes no representations, warranties, or guarantees that it can achieve any particular results. Poyner Spruill LLP shall act in good faith with the necessary due diligence in connection with its performance of the services described herein. Two local meetings with the Council and two trips to Washington, D.C., per 12-month period, as well as a monthly status report, are included in the services to be provided. Our work will be primarily on the federal level It is understood that The Ferguson Group will be assisting our firm on your behalf with regard to the services above-described. If the need arises for specialized assistance, such as grant writing or for legislative monitoring/research, then fees and costs incurred for such services will be billed separately to the client.

Retainer
The retainer for our services will be $9,500.00 per month.

Fees and Expenses
Attached to this letter is a copy of our Standard Terms of Representation which would control such matters. If an appearance before an adjudicating body of either of the executive or judicial branches is requested, then services may be provided by our firm at an hourly rate, which currently could range from $375 to $575 per hour. If needed, time devoted by paralegals would be charged at hourly rates ranging from $175-$280 per hour.

OPTION 1
– Federal issues related to Lockwood Folly Inlet Maintenance;
– Federal issues related to beach renourishment;
– Federal issues related to the General Re-evaluation Report;
– Examination of Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funding possibilities;
– Identification of grant opportunities for a second water tower for the Town and review of grant applications

OPTION 2
– Federal issues related to Lockwood Folly Inlet Maintenance;
– Federal issues related to beach renourishment;
– Federal issues related to the General Re-evaluation Report;
– Examination of Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funding possibilities;
– Identification of grant opportunities for a second water tower for the Town and review of grant applications
– Federal issues related to Shallotte Inlet maintenance;
– Review and work toward federal opportunities to assist with industry vessels needed;
– Work on easement issues to allow Town-owned property to be used for disposal of local dredging projects from federal perspective;
– Facilitation of discussions with FEMA regarding response time to Project Worksheets;
– Pursuit of quicker response from FEMA regarding final close-out payments

Previously reported – November 2018
Proposal / Ordinance 18-17
Approval is required in order to execute either of the proposals
Option 1 which reduces the level of proposed services (5) requires funding of $52,500
Option 2 the level of proposed services (10) requires funding of $66,500

For both options the amount to fund the retainer only provides funds through the end of the fiscal year.

Move funds of $66,500
From Revenue account #50.0399.0000 to Expense account#50.0710.0400

The Board in response to the presentation made by this firm requested them to bring back a proposal. Poyner Spruill submitted two proposals with a suite of services offered. Option 2 requires a retainer of $9,500 per month or a minimum of $114,000 annually. At this point we had what could be described as a spirited discussion.

Some of the major talking points were –
. 1)
What are our priorities?
. 2)
Have we utilized the other options available to us?
. 3)
Should we talk to other providers and get competitive bids?
. 4)
What are we comfortable spending?

In the end they asked the Town Manager to approach the firm and essentially ask them to redo their proposal. The BOC’s were able to agree to narrowing our priorities down to just two subject matters – Lockwood Folly Inlet and Beach Nourishment.

Request is to specifically ask them to clarify the scope of work, basic steps, deliverables, and the chances of success

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Agenda Packet – December
Scope of Engagement.
We have agreed to advise and assist you with governmental matters and legal issues that arise and the Client hereby engages Poyner Spruill LLP to perform the following services in accordance with the terms and conditions set forth in this Agreement: working with the Client to secure federal assistance and project management regarding: (1) federal issues related to beach nourishment at Holden Beach, North Carolina, and (2) federal issues related to Lockwood Folly Inlet maintenance.

Retainer
The retainer for our services will be $6,975.00 per month.

Holden Beach Renourishment Project, NC:
Background, Status and Proposed Scope of Work

Status
. 1)
Securing the funding to complete the General Reevaluation Report.
. 2)
Identifying an appropriate project plan.
. 3)Obtaining sufficient borrow material available to construct and nourish the project for 50 years.
. 4) Determining whether the amount of borrow material necessary to construct and nourish the project for 50 years can be obtained without significant environmental impacts.

Proposed Scope of Work
Step 1. Facilitate Discussions with the Corps of Engineers
Step 2. Develop a Detailed Strategy to Get the General Reevaluation Report Back on Track
Step 3. Initiate Implementation of the Strategy.
. • Steps 1-3 should be accomplished within the first six months of the contract.
Step 4. Ensure that the Project is Properly Scoped
Step 5. Work to Ensure that the General Reevaluation Report is Completed in a Timely Manner.
Step 6. Help Pursue a Construction New Start.

Poyner Proposal Options –

Option A –
The level of proposed services (10) requires funding of $9,500 per month or a minimum of $114,000 annually.
Option B –
The level of proposed services (5) requires funding of $7,500 per month or a minimum
of $90,000 annually.

Option C –
The level of proposed services (2) requires funding of $6,975 per month or a minimum
of $83,700 annually.

Update –
Once again, they asked the Town Manager to approach the firm and essentially ask them to redo their proposal. The BOC’s were able to agree to narrowing our priorities down to just one issue Beach Nourishment.

So, let me get this straight –
We go from ten (10) proposed services to just two (2) which is an 80% reduction
But the cost goes from $9,500 to $6,975 only a 27% reduction
But wait, it gets worse …
They reduce the service request to one issue without knowing what if any reduction in cost will be

Proposal / Ordinance 18-17
Approval is required in order to execute the proposal
Move funds of $41,850
From Revenue account #50.0399.0000 to Expense account#50.0710.0400

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


I’m confused… what just happened?


It’s not obvious to me, what exactly we are getting and how much it will cost us.
We just committed to hiring a prestigious law firm with little or no experience in beach nourishment issues. Not to mention, we did not even bother to see what other firms can do and at what cost. Do we know if this really is the best we can do?

Update –
Agenda Packet –
Scope of Engagement
We have agreed to advise and assist you with governmental matters and legal issues that arise and the Client hereby engages Poyner Spruill to perform the following services in accordance with the terms and conditions set forth in this Agreement: working with the Client to secure federal assistance and project management regarding:(1) federal issues related to any beach nourishment opportunities at Holden Beach, North Carolina, excluding  the Brunswick  County Beaches  Corps of Engineers 50-year Project and (2) federal issues related to Lockwood  Folly Inlet maintenance along with beach nourishment efforts for placement of beach-quality sand on the east end of Holden Beach. The Client acknowledges and agrees that Poyner Spruill does not have control over third party decision makers, and, that Poyner Spruill makes no representations, warranties, or guarantees that it can achieve any particular results. Poyner Spruill shall act in good faith with the necessary due diligence in connection with its performance of the services described herein. Two local meetings with the Council and two trips to Washington, D.C, per 12-month period, as well as a monthly status report, are included in the services to be provided. Our work for this engagement will be on the federal level. It is understood that The Ferguson Group will be assisting our firm on your behalf. As the need arises for specialized assistance, such as grant writing or for legislative monitoring/research, then fees and costs incurred for such services will be billed separately to the client.

Retainer
The retainer for our services will be $6,975.00 per month.

Poyner Spruill agreement has been executed and becomes effective January 1st.


12. Review of the Final Engineering Report to be Submitted to FEMA Pertaining to Hurricane Florence Storm Damages Totaling $7.7 Million – Commissioner Butler

Agenda Packet –
Summary
The Holden Beach shoreline has historically exhibited moderate erosion rates (with the exception of the inlets) and the Town has instituted a successful nourishment program to offset this erosion over the last two decades. The most recent nourishment sponsored by the Town was completed in March of 2017.

Hurricane Florence began significantly affecting Holden Beach shorelines from offshore as a category 4 on Wednesday, September 12th, pumping long-period storm swell to the NC coast. Although only a Category 1I tropical storm as it approached and passed over Holden Beach, Hurricane Florence was large and extremely slow moving forcing the Holden Beach shoreline to be subject to extreme waves and surge for several days.

In order to quantify storm effects from Hurricane Florence, wind, wave, water level and survey data were analyzed.  Sustained winds were over 70 mph, offshore waves were recorded observed at over 18ft high, and storm surge increased water levels to between 7.5 and 8.6 ft above MLLW.   Results of the survey indicate that the entire Holden Beach shoreline was Impacted and lost approximately 276,000 cy above -5 ft. NGVD as a result of Hurricane Florence.  Some observed damage to the dunes and recently installed sand fencings were reported following Hurricane Florence.

Based on the post-Florence survey data within the engineered sections of shoreline, much of the most significant damage/erosion occurred in the upper beach generally between MHW and the dune line. Fortunately, the dune system suffered comparatively minor losses, as the wide beach berm constructed during the recent 2017 nourishments appeared to have helped buffer wave energy during the storm but has suffered some significant erosion as a result.

The engineered beach (i.e., the Central Reach section of shoreline) experienced a loss of -202,000 cy, with the majority of this material (-115,000 cy) being lost from the upper beach landward of I above the MHW line. Note that the engineered beach volume losses only include the Town’s Central Reach nourishment shoreline and do not include the USACE nourishment shoreline reach along the east end (-between Stations 20+00 and 40+00).

Update –
The report provides key facts and outlines our losses. Town Manager Hewitt briefly discussed the highlights of the report. Our current policy is to survey the beach strand, inlet to inlet, both before and after storm events. The report quantifies our losses, FEMA reviews the report and develop a project worksheet. Unfortunately, the Central Reach Project area is the only portion of the beach strand that qualifies for reimbursement.


13. Discussion and Possible Action to Begin a Process for Removal of Existing Waste Bin Corrals that Were Built Forward of Houses –
Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Agenda Packet –
Previous Ordinance
§50.04 ACCUMULATION AND COLLECTION.
         (A)   All garbage and household refuse shall be kept in proper containers as required by this chapter and it shall be unlawful for any person to permit garbage to accumulate or remain on any premises longer than is reasonably necessary for its removal. Containers will be located at curbside by the property owner or their representative on designated collection days, and then should be returned to the normal house-side storage location by 6:00 p.m. the day after collection. See subsection (B) for an alternative storage location.
.         (B)         It is the intent of the town that all 90-gallon containers be secured in such a manner either next to non-elevated or underneath elevated houses, except on collection days when they are to be placed at curbside, so that the town street right-of-way remains clear of empty containers, and so that containers are not damaged or overturned by high winds or other occurrences.  For those property owners who cannot make arrangements to have their container placed at or removed from curbside, an alternate non-collection day storage arrangement is as follows: A sturdy, wooden three-sided rack of sufficient size to just hold the required container(s) may be constructed by the owner. The rack must be constructed so the opening allows for the easy removal of the 90-gallon container(s) by the collector on collection days; e.g. the container must roll in and roll out of the rack without having to be lifted. The racks shall not be placed more than five feet from the street right-of-way and shall not be placed within the area of the street right-of-way. The rack shall be maintained in a sound and presentable condition. 

Current Ordinance
§50.04 ACCUMULATION AND COLLECTION.
          (A)      All garbage and household refuse shall be kept in proper containers as required by this chapter and it shall be unlawful for any person to permit garbage to accumulate or remain on any premises longer than is reasonably necessary for its removal. It is the intent of the town that all containers be secured in such a manner either next to non-elevated or underneath elevated houses, except on collection days when they are to be placed at street side, so that the town street right-of-way remains clear of empty containers, and so that containers are not damaged or overturned by high winds or other occurrences. Containers will be located at street side no earlier than 6:00 p.m. the evening before designated collection days during the summer rental season. For the rest of the year containers will be located at street side no more than 48 hours before the designated collection. All containers should be returned to the normal house-side storage location by 6:00p.m. the day after collection.

Update –
Commissioner Kwiatkowski position is that the waste bin corrals no longer serve a purpose. Current ordinance requires them to be either next to non-elevated or underneath elevated houses. Waste Industries has not, for some time now, been rolling pails to curb from corrals. In addition, the Town recently approved whole island rollback of pails to house starting sometime this year. The Board is encouraging owners to remove the corrals or relocate them nearer to the house. They would like to see them taken out of the right-of-way and put further away from the street. Although they are not mandating this now, they may have to in order to get the desired action.

No decision was made – No action taken


14. Discussion and Possible Action on Defining the Waste Ordinance Enforcement Policy – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

THB ORDINANCE 18-16 / CHAPTER 50: SOLID WASTE
For more information » click here

Discussion was about how to combine education with enforcement and how do we effectively communicate the rule change to the public. Pat plans to meet with Town staff and put something together for the next BOC’s meeting. David reminded the Board that they need to keep in mind that there is a cost associated with the enforcement phase. At least three (3) of the Board members want to hold off issuing any civil fines until we are able to offer a fee-based rollout service.

No decision was made – No action taken


15. Discussion and Possible Action to Include Fee Based Rollout of Waste and Recycle Containers in Ordinance 18-16, Chapter 50: Solid Waste –
Commissioner Freer

The saga continues. Apparently, some of the Board members feel that we have only addressed half of the problem. Therefore, we should hold off until we are able to implement a fee-based rollout service. David pointed out that implementing a rollout service was not as simple as it would seem, a number of variables make it much more complex then the rollback program. Peter volunteered to take the point on this issue.

No decision was made – No action taken

The question that needs to be asked is: Why didn’t we have this conversation before adopting the ordinance? The process started in August and Ordinance 18-16 was adopted in December of 2018.


16. Discussion of Possible Beach Monitoring for Pets During Offseason/ Holidays or Other Actions that May Reduce Ordinance Violations –
Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Agenda Packet –
§90.20 RESPONSIBILITIES OF OWNERS.

   (A)   It shall be unlawful for any owner or keeper to allow:

      (1)   A dog off the premises of the owner and not under the control of the owner, a member of his immediate family, or other responsible person, either by leash, cord, or chain.

      (2)   Any pet to be on the strand during the hours of 9:00 a.m. through 5:00 p.m. from May 20 through September 10.

      (3)   Any pet to injure or threaten to injure any person, another pet, or any wildlife.

      (4)   Any pet to damage property, including lawns, plants, shrubs, or trees.

      (5)   Excrement deposited by a pet to remain if the excrement is deposited on the strand, on maintained yard areas of persons other than its owner, or upon any public street, beach accessway, parking area, or campground.

         (a)   Any person owning, harboring, walking, in possession of or in charge of a dog, which defecates on public property, public park property, public right-of-way property or any private property, including vacant lots, without the permission of the private property owner, shall remove all feces immediately after it is deposited by the dog.  All feces removed in accordance with this section shall be placed in a suitable bag or other container that closes and disposes of in a lawful manner.

         (b)   Any person while harboring, walking, in possession of or in charge of a dog on public property, public park property, public right-of-way or any private property, including vacant lots, without the permission of the private property owner, shall have in his or her possession bags or containers that close, which are suitable for removing feces deposited by the dog.  Said person shall have a suitable quantity of bags or containers to remove all feces deposited by the dog.

         (c)   The provisions of this section shall not apply to blind persons using dogs as guides.

         (d)   Violation of this section shall be punishable as described in § 90.99.

      (6)   Any pet to upset or otherwise disturb garbage or trash containers.

      (7)   Any pet to bark, cry, or otherwise habitually or repeatedly emit its natural sounds in such a manner or to such an extent that it is a public nuisance.

   (B)   It shall be unlawful for any owner to fail to provide his pet with sufficient good and wholesome food and water, proper shelter and protection from the weather, veterinary care when needed to prevent suffering, and with humane care and treatment. It shall be unlawful for any person to beat, cruelly ill-treat, torment, overload, overwork, or otherwise abuse any pet.

Update –
They had some discussion with the understanding that there are two sides of a coin. Once again, David reminded the Board that they need to keep in mind that there is a cost associated with having someone out on the beach strand. A token effort was made to address the free ranging dogs’ issue by asking the police to attempt random patrolling and increase their visibility on the beach strand. 

No decision was made – No action taken

Frankly I am used to the fact that most dogs are not on a leash on the beach strand, but it has become ridiculous during the last three holidays. Worse yet is that owners are not removing all feces immediately after it is deposited by their dog. Sadly, this is not that unusual, and doesn’t seem to align with our “Family Beach” moniker. Although I appreciate their attempt to address this issue without enforcement, we are just spinning our wheels. As it is when the Police or Rangers are on the beach strand, we have a significant amount of non-compliance with these ordinances. Maybe a presence and enforcement during festivals and holiday weekends might be helpful. I believe that most of the people know the rules but without any penalty they choose to ignore them. In other words, there are no consequences for their actions. Really would like to see either the police or rangers have some presence on the beach strand enforcing our ordinances would seem a good place to start. It may not eliminate the problem completely, but it couldn’t hurt

Pet Peeve / Abridged Version
Chapter 90 / Animals / 90.20
         •
Dog’s need to be on a leash
.          • Owner’s need to clean up after their animals (It’s their doody!)

People should not have to fear walking on the beach because of dogs not on leashes.
Goal should be to keep the beach protected, clean and safe
Currently there is almost no penalty for non-compliance
No point in having ordinances if we don’t enforce them
We need people on the beach strand enforcing the ordinances
With more meaningful enforcement you will have greater compliance

Dogs at Wrightsville Beach Flyer
Called Wrightsville Beach and spoke to their Park Ranger who is a full-time animal control officer, they issued over 100 citations at $250 per ticket and over 250 verbal warnings annually.


17. Discussion and Possible Agreement on Methodology to be Used for BOC Objectives Setting Meeting – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Previously reported – January 2018
Goals & Objectives
Town Manager sorted by organizational groupings as follows:

  1. General Management
  2. Beach Nourishment / Shoreline Protection / Navigation
  3. Beach / Inlet Funding
  4. Town Facilities / Recreational Items
  5. Staffing
  6. Parking
  7. Communications
  8. Solid Waste
  9. Sewer System

Previously reported – December 2018
Commissioner Kwiatkowski
As we start the year, there would be benefit from a Board of Commissioners and Town Manager meeting to set agreed major 2019 objectives before we begin the budget process. The BOCM should schedule a January date for such a meeting.

By consensus they agreed to schedule a January workshop

Agenda Packet –
Five (5) categories should be the maximum, proposed these four (4)

  1. Policies, procedures, and resolutions
  2. Ordinance related
  3. Financial / Budget
  4. Long term plans
  5. Advocacy

Update –
BOC’s objective setting workshop is scheduled on January 16th


18. Discussion and Possible Scheduling of Date for Interviews for Vacancy on the Parks & Recreation Advisory Board – Town Clerk Finnell

Agenda Packet –
Staff recommendation is for the Board to schedule a Special Meeting to hold interviews for the vacancy on February 19, 2019 at 6:45 p.m., prior to the next Board meeting.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


19. Town Manager’s Report

Internal Control Review
They are about ready to issue report, should have it this week

Annual Audit
Anticipate that will complete in the next few weeks, delay is due to the storm events
The auditor Rives & Associates has advised the Local Government Commission

Storm Events
Three FEMA hurricane damage reimbursement programs being worked simultaneously
. 1)
Matthew $335,000 reimbursement still outstanding, final report was sent
. 2)
Florence @$8,000,000 submitted everything we could
.   • Engineering report is not finalized yet
.   • Federal Beach Technical Advisor needs to complete required Cat G Project Worksheet
. 3) Michael submitted our estimated losses
  • W
ithout federal declaration this might not happen
.   •
Governor Cooper has requested federal declaration
  • No federal declaration has been issued yet
.   • Federal Beach Technical Advisor will write submittal
  •
Additional surveying of beach strand losses underway to meet federal guidelines

Rollback
Statement of Work was advertised
Should be able to bring bids to the BOC’s February meeting

Inlet Hazard Areas
New proposed rules could significantly impact real estate property values
Significantly expands area covered on the island
.by .4 miles on the east end
.by 1.7 miles on the west end
Coastal Resource Commission report to be presented at their February meeting

Panel Proposes Redrawn Inlet Hazard Areas
Read more » click here

Coastal Resources Commission
CRC Science Panel / Inlet Hazard Area (IHA) Delineation Update
Read more » click here


Canal Dredging Project
Previously reported – December 2017
Adoption Resolution 17-10, Water Resources Development Grant ($1,439,922)
The grant is good for two years and will accelerate our current dredging schedule. Each canal will be responsible for paying for their dredging project costs upfront. It is a reimbursement grant which means we do not receive the funds from the state until after satisfactory completion of the project.

Previously reported – June 2018
The Town is planning to perform a complete dredge of all of the canals this coming fall/winter (November 2018 – Mar 2019). We have been apprised of recent changes regarding the obtainment of consent agreements for USACE dredge spoil areas. Those changes will result in closer scrutiny of remaining capacity in existing sites; hence longer/unknown lead times and quite possibly denial of permission to place material from this fall’s canal maintenance dredging in the Corps disposal sites. The Town has been preparing the area adjacent to the dog park as an alternate site if unable to use the USACE dredge spoil areas. David reminded us that this is a big undertaking with lots of moving parts and will require considerable time and effort from the Town staff to pull it off without a hitch.

Water Bill
The Town is planning to perform a complete dredge of all of the canals this coming fall/winter (November 2018 – Mar 2019). It is recommended that property owners begin getting ready for the canal dredging as early as possible by first assessing the condition of their bulkheads so that repairs on those structures can be made in plenty of time before dredging begins. This will not only provide for the best dredging effort, but also lesson the possibility of leaky bulkheads filling canals back in prematurely after dredge completion. The Town will also be conducting its annual inspection of the bulkheads. Likewise, it is also recommended that property owners begin to coordinate the actions needed to move your floating docks in anticipation of the actual dredge arrival in order to facilitate a better excavation near their pilings. Finally, boat movements should also be considered. You may want to begin planning for winter accommodations and repairs to your boat now. Remember that boat dry docks book up fast.

Previously reported – August 2018
Town had meeting with potential bidders for the canal dredging project
He anticipates bid letting date sometime in September
Dredging is scheduled to start in the middle of November

The Town has been preparing the area adjacent to the dog park off Scotch Bonnet.
It will be necessary to close the dog park this winter once dredging project begins.
The dog park will probably have to be closed until Memorial Day in 2019.

Previously reported – October 2018
Construction at the Scotch Bonnet dredge spoil area began this week in preparation for this winter’s canal dredging project. We ask that canal property owners begin to move their boats and docks if possible in preparation for the dredge event. The tentative schedule will begin with Holden Beach Harbor mid-November, followed by Heritage Harbor mid-January, and Harbor Acres mid-February.

Previously reported – November 2018
King Dredging is fully mobilized on site with dredge in canals. Scotch Bonnet dredge spoil area work is just about completed. Dredging operations are scheduled to commence the first day of December working the canals from east to west. Property owners should have made dock and boat arrangements already, but if you haven’t there’s still a little time left.

King Dredging is just about ready to begin with the following tentative schedule:
.   1)
Holden Beach Harbor – December 1st through January 25th
.   2) Heritage Harbor – January 26th through February 25th
.   3) Harbor Acres – Feb 26th through April 9th

Previously reported – December 2018
Canal Dredging operations are underway but is running about two weeks behind projected schedule. The dredge “Patricia Sanderson” started work in the Holden Beach Harbor feeder canal.

Update –
Progress continues, proceeding without any significant issues. 

Heritage Harbor
The contractor anticipates beginning work in Heritage Harbor, which includes canals between Scotch Bonnet and Sand Dollar, in February. Due to the size of the dredge, the contractor has asked that boats on lifts in Heritage Harbor be removed before dredging begins. This will allow for a better dredge in this set of canals as the dredge follows the designed template.  Please accommodate the request at your earliest convenience.


Upcoming Events

Run Holden Beach
The fifth annual “Run Holden Beach” event is scheduled on Saturday, January 19th. They have 1,750 registered runners, expect traffic issues / delays between 7:00am to 11:00am.

50th Anniversary Events
“Time” to Celebrate: Join us on February 14th at 2:00 p.m. in the Town Hall Public Assembly to help us get our 50th Anniversary Time Capsule started. Cake and ice cream will be served. Call (910) 842-6488 to pre-register. Pre-registration is required.

Community Social: Don’t miss a dinner to commemorate our history on Saturday, February 16th at 6:00 p.m. An oral history of the Town will be presented at this time. Immediately following dinner, a bonfire will be held on the beach, weather permitting. Call (910) 842-6488 to pre-register by February 7th at 10:00 a.m.

NCMCA
North Carolina Association of Municipal Clerks Academy
Holden Beach is the host site for their annual training seminar on April 5th

Pickleball
Battle of the Beach
Pickleball Tournament will be held on Holden Beach on May 3rd through May 5th

Christmas Trees
Lowes of Shallotte has donated their left-over Christmas trees to the Town.  Coastal Transplants used the trees as dune builders at the east end access, Jordan Blvd, Quinton and Castaways’ Public Walkways.


20. Mayor’s Comments

In reference to the Inlet Hazard Areas, trash cans and dogs discussed tonight Alan said:

How many times have we plowed this field?!


21. Executive Session Pursuant to North Carolina General Statute 143-318.11(A)(6) To Consider the Performance of an Employee and North Carolina General Statute 143-318.11(A)(3) to Consult with Town Attorney – Commissioner Kwiatkowski and Attorney Fox

The public left when the Board went into Executive Session. I was informed that they were in session for the better part of an hour addressing a number of issues. When they came back into open session, they unanimously approved Resolution 19-01.

RESOLUTION 19-01 / RESOLUTION OF TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH AUTHORIZING FILING OF CONDEMNATION ACTIONS TO ACQUIRE PERPETUAL EASEMENTS FOR THE TOWN’S EASTERN REACH SHORE PROTECTION PROJECT

RESOLUTION 19-01
For more information » click here

The Town will attempt to acquire easements at the east end of the island by condemnation for future beach strand nourishment projects.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


General Comments –

There were twenty-nine (29) members of the community in attendance

The BOC’s February Regular Meeting is scheduled on the third Tuesday of the month, February 19th

Town Manager’s Review
The Town Managers 2017 performance review was supposed to be done on the anniversary date of his hire which is in February. Once again it was not done in a timely manner.


Fiscal Year 2017 – 2018 Audit Results
Auditor’s report is due by October 31st
and is normally is given at the October meeting. Report was not given at the October meeting and it wasn’t scheduled at the  November, December or January meetings. Town Manager reported at the October meeting that the storm events have delayed the annual audit process. The field work by the external auditor won’t be completed till mid-November. The auditor Rives & Associates has advised the Local Government Commission.


News & Views reports what’s happening on Holden Beach and in the surrounding area with items of interest.

Post contains the following:
.     1)
Calendar of Events
.     2)
Reminders
    3)
Upon Further Review
.     4)
Corrections & Amplifications
.     5)
Odds and Ends
    6)
This and That
    7)
Factoid That May Interest Only Me
    8)
Things I Think I Think
.      
a) Restaurant Review
.      
b) Book Review


Board of Commissioners’ Scorecard –

 The goal of government is to make citizens better off

NYC Mayor Koch used to ask – How am I doing?
Imagine if the BOC’s asked you – How’d they do?

Action Taken – 2018
January
Adoption Resolution 18-01, Approval of BB&T Signature Card
February
Ordinance 18-01, Chapter 30: Town Government and Officials / Amendment to §30.25
.   • Removal of “or sibling” verbiage
Ordinance 18-04, Amending the Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#1)
.   •
Beach Strand Dune Stabilization – approved $50,000 in April of 2017
.   •
Approved additional $29,375 for vegetation west of the Central Reach Project
Ordinance 18-05, Amending the Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#2)
.   •
Pointe West stormwater repair project approved $9,000
Ordinance 18-06, Amending the Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#3)
.   • Water Resources Development Grant ($1,439,922)
.   •
Canal maintenance dredging matching funds
March
NA
April
Resolution 11-02, Revoked Terminal Groin Application
Adoption Resolution 18-02, Withdraw Terminal Groin Permit Application
Ordinance 18-02, Establishing the Inlet and Beach Protection Board
Ordinance 18-03, Amending Chapter 34: Parks & Recreation Advisory Board
Ordinance 18-07, Amending Chapter 72: Parking Regulations
Ordinance 18-08, Amending Chapter 95: Streets
Approval of Contract for Roadway Work
.   •
Highland Paving Asphalt was awarded the $92,050 contract
May
Ordinance 18-09, Amending the Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#4)
.   •
Sewer System Upgrade approved $283,000
June
Resolution 18-03, Amending the Official Zoning Map
Adoption Resolution 18-04, Adopting System Development Fees Report
Adoption Resolution 18-05, Amending Fee Schedule
Ordinance 18-10, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance / Budget Ordinance
.   • Approved the town’s $20.9 million-dollar Budget Ordinance
Adoption Resolution 18-06, Designating July as Park & Recreation Month
Ordinance 18-11, Amending Chapter 154: Flood Damage Prevention
July
Adoption Resolution 18-07, Adopting Rules of Procedure
Authorized updating CAMA Land Use Plan
.   •
Approved $30,000
Approval of Contract to Conduct Town’s Internal Control Review
.   •
RSM was awarded the $20,000 contract
Ordinance 18-12, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#5)
.   •
Internal Audit Contract approved $20,000
Approval of Contract to Conduct Town’s Audit
.   •
Rives & Associates was awarded the $14,784 contract
.   •
First year
Adoption Resolution 18-08, Amending Fund Balance Policy
August
Adoption Resolution 18-09, Amending the Official Zoning Map
Ordinance 18-13, Amending Chapter 154: Flood Damage Prevention
Repeal and Replace Development Fee Schedule
September
Meeting Cancelled
October
Approval of Contract for Canal Maintenance Dredging
.   • King Dredging was awarded the $840,000 contract
Adoption Resolution 18-10, Position on Lockwood Folly Inlet Maintenance
Ordinance 18-14, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#2)
.   •
ATM modeling and analysis LWF contract approved $47,000
.   •
Ordinance 18-15, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#3)
.   • Curbside Recycling amended contract approved $9,883
Adoption Resolution 18-12,
.   • Amend the fee schedule to reflect the new recycling fee of $67.56
November
NA
December
Ordinance 18-16, Solid Waste / Amendment to §50.00
Adoption Resolution 18-13,
.   • Amend the fee schedule to reflect the new recycling fee of $82.48
Adoption Resolution 18-14,
.   • Amend the fee schedule to reflect the new Special Event Fees
Ordinance 18-17, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance (#4)
.   • Poyner Spruill Consulting Service contract for $41,850
Ordinance 18-18, Adopting Amendments to Chapter 30 / Town Government and Officials  .   • §30.26 / Audit Committee
Amending Resolution 18-07, Rules of Procedure
.   • Encourage public participation / Public Comments
.   •
Agenda items require significant supporting documentation


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Hurricane Season –

Hurricane #1 - CR

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) defines a hurricane as “an intense tropical weather system with a well-defined circulation and maximum sustained winds of 74 mph (64 knots) or higher.”

Be prepared – have a plan!

For assistance with making an emergency plan read more here »
. 1) FEMA Ready
. 2) American Red Cross Disaster and Safety Library
. 3) ReadyNC
. 4) Town Emergency Information
. 5) HBPOIN Hurricane Emergency Plan

THB – EVACUATION, CURFEW & VEHICLE DECALS
For more information » click here

If the Town declares a mandatory evacuation, PLEASE LEAVE
General Assembly during the 2012 Session, specifically authorizes both voluntary and mandatory evacuations, and increases the penalty for violating any local emergency restriction or prohibition from a Class 3 to a Class 2 misdemeanor. Given the broad authority granted to the governor and city and county officials under the North Carolina Emergency Management Act (G.S. Chapter 166A) to take measures necessary to protect public health, safety, and welfare during a disaster, it is reasonable to interpret the authority to “direct and compel” evacuations to mean ordering “mandatory” evacuations. Those who choose to not comply with official warnings to get out of harm’s way, or are unable to, should prepare themselves to be fully self-sufficient for the first 72 hours after the storm.

No matter what a storm outlook is for a given year,

vigilance and preparedness is urged.


BEACH & INLET NEWSLETTERDecember 2018
This storm season proved to be active for the Town of Holden Beach. We were visited by both Hurricane Florence and Michael, as well as additional recent astrological tide events that produced flooding. The Town lost approximately 257,707 cubic yards of sand in Hurricane Florence in September, with 201,564 cubic yards occurring in the engineered beach area. Post Michael storm analysis shows that we lost approximately 136,087 cubic yards along the shoreline with 90,927 cubic yards occurring in the engineered beach area. Although the beach took a hit with estimated damages for the beach strand currently totaling $7,797,917 for Florence and $5,623,046 for Michael, the Central Reach Project proved invaluable as a storm damage reduction project. It was instrumental in the protection of the dune system and homes along the beachfront. We are working with FEMA on a weekly basis to finalize damage reports in order to qualify for federal and state funding of repairs to the beach strand. As an engineered beach, approval of project damage assessments by FEMA should result in reimbursements of storm damage repairs.

How are your favorite N.C. beaches getting repaired after Florence?
The storm caused at least $119 million in damage to beaches in the state’s southeastern corner.
Holden Beach is an example of a community that would likely see its replacement sand funded through FEMA. The Brunswick County town suffering $7.78 million in damage to a beach that had seen 4.1 miles in the middle of the island expanded in March 2017, a $15 million project known as the Central Reach. David Hewett, the town’s manager, said the Central Reach area saw some erosion — about 150,000 cubic yards, according to a Department of Water Resources document — and some dunes were damaged on the island’s west end. “Our Central Reach project,” Hewett said, “really proves the case in point that a wide, healthy beach with a consistent dune structure provides tremendous storm damage protection.” Completed in March 2017, the Central Reach project was a locally funded $15 million effort that added about 1.31 million cubic yards of sand to the middle of Holden Beach’s shoreline. When asked how long it would take to repair the town’s beach, David Hewett, the town’s manager, said, “I would hesitate to be pinned down on when that could happen. It could take years. A big piece of that is on the federal government to process approvals of storm damage reimbursements, then there’s a whole process involving contracting, bidding and environmental windows.”
Read more » click here


HBPOIN – Lou’s Views
.          • Gather and disseminate information
.          • Identify the issues and determine how they affect you
.          • Act as a watchdog
.          • Grass roots monthly newsletter since 2008


https://lousviews.com/

01 – News & Views

Lou’s Views
News & Views / January Edition

Calendar of Events –

Run Holden Beach – 2019
The fifth annual “Run Holden Beach” event is scheduled on Saturday, January 19th. Coastal Race Productions is planning a 1 mile “turtle trot”, 5k walk / run and a half marathon with all of these races starting and finishing under the bridge. This will all be followed by live music, games and an after party at the Holden Beach Pavilion.
For more information » click here
Register » click here

 


Las Vegas Night
The Rotary Club of Shallotte will host its Fourteenth Annual Las Vegas Night on Saturday, January 26th at 349 Whiteville Road, the Planet Fun building in Shallotte.


TDA - logoDiscover a wide range of things to do in the Brunswick Islands for an experience that goes beyond the beach.
For more information » click here


Calendar of Events Island –

Happy Birthday – celebrate the Town’s 50th birthday
Town of Holden Beach officially established on February 14, 1969

“Time” to Celebrate:
Join us on February 14th at 2:00 p.m. in the Town Hall Public Assembly to help us get our 50th Anniversary Time Capsule started. Cake and ice cream will be served. Call (910) 842-6488 to register.

Community Social:
Don’t miss a dinner to commemorate our history on Saturday, February 16th at 6:00 p.m. An oral history of the Town will be presented at this time. Immediately following dinner, a bonfire will be held on the beach, weather permitting. Call (910) 842-6488 to register by February 7th at 10:00 a.m.


Parks & Recreation / Programs & Events
For more information » click here


Reminders –


Dog Park Closed
The Dog Park is closed due to the canal dredging project. As it stands now, the USACE will not allow the Town to place material from the canal dredging in their spoil area. Pending CAMA approval, the Town plans on using land at the dog park as its spoils area. The dog park will remain closed until after the dredging project is complete. They anticipate the park will be closed until at least Memorial Day.

 


BOC’s Meeting
The Board of Commissioners’ February Regular Meeting is scheduled on the third Tuesday of the month, February 19th

 



News from Town of Holden Beach

The town sends out emails of events, news, agendas, notifications and emergency information. If you would like to be added to their mailing list, please go to their web site to complete your subscription to the Holden Beach E-Newsletter.
For more information » click here


Canal Dredging
The Town is planning to perform a complete dredge of all of the canals this coming fall/winter (November 2018 – Mar 2019). It is recommended that property owners begin getting ready for the canal dredging as early as possible by first assessing the condition of their bulkheads so that repairs on those structures can be made in plenty of time before dredging begins. This will not only provide for the best dredging effort, but also lesson the possibility of leaky bulkheads filling canals back in prematurely after dredge completion. The Town will also be conducting its annual inspection of the bulkheads. Likewise, it is also recommended that property owners begin to coordinate the actions needed to move your floating docks in anticipation of the actual dredge arrival in order to facilitate a better excavation near their pilings. Finally, boat movements should also be considered. You may want to begin planning for winter accommodations and repairs to your boat now. Remember that boat dry docks book up fast.

Dredging Project – October
Construction at the Scotch Bonnet dredge spoil area began this week in preparation for this winter’s canal dredging project. We ask that canal property owners begin to move their boats and docks if possible in preparation for the dredge event. The tentative schedule will begin with Holden Beach Harbor mid-November, followed by Heritage Harbor mid-January, and Harbor Acres mid-February.

Note: This schedule may be affected by inclement weather.

King Dredging is partially mobilized on site and is prepping containment area by dog park. Dredging scheduled to commence in the middle of November working the canals from east to west.

Dredging ProjectNovember
King Dredging is fully mobilized on site with dredge in canals. Scotch Bonnet dredge spoil area work is just about completed. Dredging operations are scheduled to commence the first day of December working the canals from east to west. Work is starting with Holden Beach Harbor, which includes canals between High Point and Greensboro. Property owners should have made dock and boat arrangements already, but if you haven’t there’s still a little time left.

King Dredging is just about ready to begin with the following tentative schedule:
. 1)
Holden Beach Harbor – December 1st through January 25th
. 2) Heritage Harbor – January 26th through February 25th
. 3) Harbor Acres – Feb 26th through April 9th

Dredging ProjectDecember
Canal Dredging operations are underway. The dredge “Patricia Sanderson” started work in the Holden Beach Harbor feeder canal late last week. Currently, the dredge is working near the northern end of Durham Street heading west in the feeder canal. If you haven’t taken care of making arrangements to move your in water boats you need to do so as soon as possible.

Dredging ProjectJanuary
Due to the size of the dredge, the contractor has asked that boats on lifts in Heritage Harbor be removed before dredging begins. This will allow for a better dredge in this set of canals as the dredge follows the designed template. The contractor anticipates beginning work in Heritage Harbor in February. Please accommodate the request at your earliest convenience.


Volunteers needed
The Town is always looking for people to volunteer for their various boards and committees. If you are interested in serving, please fill out a resume form and submit it to heather@hbtownhall.com.


Recycling-Bin
Curbside Recycling

Waste Industries is now offering curbside recycling for Town properties that desire to participate in the service. The service cost is $82.48 annually paid in advance to the Town of Holden Beach and consists of a ninety-six (96) gallon cart that is emptied every other week.
Curbside Recycling Application » click here
Curbside Recycling Calendar » click here


Elevator - CRElevators
Most states mandate that elevator systems be tested and inspected annually. Currently the state of North Carolina does not require annual inspections to be performed on all elevator systems. The use of unsafe and defective lifting devices imposes a substantial probability of serious and preventable injury to your family and guests. It is in the owner’s best interest to minimize injuries and liability by scheduling an annual safety inspection to ensure the safe operation of their elevator system.


Safety Notice –

Waupaca Elevator Company has issued an important safety notice. The potential hazard is associated with normal wear in your elevator. If your elevator develops the problem and it is not repaired, the elevator may drop unexpectedly with you in it and you may be injured. They recommend you contact your elevator service company.


Library
If you need something to keep you busy in this colder weather, make sure to visit the island library. The library is in the upstairs of Holden Beach Town Hall. All the books were donated. Patrons of the library don’t have to check out a book; they are on the honor system to return it.

 


Neighborhood Watch –
Need to look out for each other
Call 911 if you see or hear anything suspicious
Fill out Keep Check Request Form if you will be out of town
• Submit completed Property Registration Form
• Pickup copy of Protecting Your Home


Upon Further Review –Seismic Testing / Offshore Drilling

Previously reported – September 2015
Resolution 15-09 is in opposition to offshore exploration and drilling. Why? Because we have a tourism based economy, along with the local fishing industry and quality of life depends on the health and welfare of our natural resources. We believe that the inherent risks to our region from offshore exploration and drilling have the potential to irrevocably harm our natural environment, our economic well-being and our overall quality of life. Including us there are now 79 municipalities that have passed resolutions opposing offshore exploration and drilling.

Previously reported – December 2018
Trump admin. approves seismic tests for Atlantic offshore oil drilling
The approval moves forward a policy that many affected states don’t want.
Read more » click here

Did drilling off NC coast just move one step closer?
Environmentalists sue NOAA after agency last month said companies could harass fish and mammals during seismic testing
Read more » click here

Groups sue feds to stop seismic airgun blasting in Atlantic Ocean
Leading environmental groups sued the federal government today to prevent seismic airgun blasting in the Atlantic Ocean. This extremely loud and dangerous process, which is used to search for oil and gas deposits deep below the ocean’s surface, is the first step toward offshore drilling. If allowed, seismic airgun blasting would harm marine life, including whales, dolphins, fish and zooplankton – the foundation of the ocean food web.
Read more » click here

What did N.C. leaders do to reinforce their opposition to offshore drilling?
Less than a month after the federal government took an important step toward issuing seismic testing permits, North Carolina leaders have reiterated the state’s opposition to seismic and any other steps that could ultimately lead toward offshore drilling. Thursday, N.C. Governor Roy Cooper joined a bipartisan group of East Coast governors in a letter stating their strong opposition to both offshore drilling and seismic testing, while Attorney General Josh Stein was part of a group of attorneys general intervening in a lawsuit against the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).
Read more » click here

Update –

Dems introduce bills to block offshore drilling
A group of House Democrats introduced a suite of eight bills Tuesday aimed at blocking President Trump’s proposal to expand offshore oil and natural gas drilling around the country. Taken together, the bills would ban or put a 10-year moratorium on offshore drilling in the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic oceans, as well as the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The bills came as the Interior Department is expected soon to move forward on its plan released in January 2018 to open the offshore areas of the Atlantic, Pacific, Arctic and Gulf coasts to offshore oil and natural gas drilling. That plan has met stiff opposition from political leaders and coastal communities that neighbor nearly all of the areas.
Read more » click here

SC attorney general joins lawsuit to stop seismic testing, offshore drilling S.C. Attorney General Alan Wilson joined a lawsuit Monday against the Trump administration to block seismic testing for oil and gas off the South Carolina coast.Backed by GOP Gov. Henry McMaster, Wilson became the first Republican attorney general to join a legal fight — launched by 16 S.C. cities, nine environmental groups and nine Democratic state attorneys general — to halt permits for exploration off the Atlantic Coast. Those suing say exploration will harm the environment and South Carolina tourism. Wilson’s filing unites an unlikely coalition in opposition to one of President Donald Trump’s highest priorities — expanding efforts to find new deposits of fossil fuels — as the Republican president seeks to roll back Obama-era regulations that blocked drilling on more than 90 percent of the outer continental shelf.
Read more » click here


Previously reported –

Holden Beach Newsletter

 

Chemours has issued a press release announcing that the company will take measures to eliminate byproduct GenX wastewater emissions from its Fayetteville site.
Click here to view the release.

In order to keep citizens informed, Brunswick County has established a website to share information about GenX as they learn it. You can find this page at www.brunswickcountync.gov/genx. The website contains a FAQ section that they update as they learn additional information (or receive additional questions), links to all their press releases and links to other resources like information from NCDEQ. There is also a link where citizens can go to sign up to receive email updates on the topic.


The Public Information Officer for Brunswick County announced that the County has taken legal action against DuPont and Chemours for contaminating the Cape Fear River.

10.31.2017
Statement from Brunswick County
The filing of formal legal action against Chemours and DuPont represents another crucial step in protecting our public drinking water supply. It sends a clear message that Brunswick County will simply not stand for the discharge of emerging or unregulated chemicals into our public drinking water supply. Let us be clear…we will ensure that any company that threatens this vital resource is held responsible. Furthermore, our litigation team is consulting the nation’s leading experts to determine the best long-term water testing and treatment methods for the entire county. As part of that, we will ensure that the costs for doing so do not fall upon the rate payers, but upon those dumping the unregulated chemicals in the water.
For more information » click here

Previously reported – December 2018

NCDEQ does all it plans to do on lower Cape Fear GenX contaminants
The North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality has done all it intends to do to address GenX and other per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAs) in the lower Cape Fear River, based on answers provided in a Nov. 29 media conference call. Read more » click here

Why did CFPUA blast a proposed consent order between N.C. DEQ,
Chemours and Cape Fear River Watch?
State regulators are not looking out for the needs of residents or utilities downstream of Chemours’ Fayetteville Works facility, the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority (CFPUA) alleged in a pair of motions filed Thursday in Bladen County Superior Court.
Read more » click here

Update –

Chemours promises to reduce pollutants,
but concerns persist downstream
Read more » click here


Lockwood Folly Inlet Dredging


Previously reported – December 2018

Corps’ Rule Could Dash Town’s Sand Plan
Sand that Holden Beach has received for years to re-nourish its east-end oceanfront may instead go to a neighboring island, a prospect that caught town officials by surprise and questioning why the sudden change.
Read more » click here


Holden Beach eyes sand from 2019 project to reinforce island’s east end
Holden Beach’s east end could receive sand from a possible Lockwood Folly Inlet project next year.
Read more » click here


Corps approves dredging contract; good news for Oak Island
After removing some of the optional jobs, such as grooming freshly renourished beaches, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has awarded a $3.3-million contract to Southwind Construction Co. for work on area waterways. The bid award is good news for Oak Island, which expects to receive 88,000 cubic yards of sand along an eroded section of the western part of the island near 69th Place West. It is expected to cover about 2,500 feet of beach.
Read more » click here

Holden Beach inlet board recommends pursuing sand project
Holden Beach’s inlet and beach protection board recommended town commissioners pursue a project that could mean sand being placed on the east end of Holden Beach. In an email sent to Town Manager David Hewett, Oak Island Town Manager David Kelly and Brunswick County Manager Ann Hardy, Deputy County Manager Steve Stone said the county received a grant award contract from the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality Division of Water Resources for the Lockwood Folly Navigation Project submitted last summer. The application indicated the county would work to place the resultant beach-quality material, estimated to be in the range of 250,000 cubic yards, on one of the two beaches. The county is seeking feedback from Holden Beach and Oak Island before it pursues the project. Stone said county originally proposed paying 25 percent of the required local share, or $344,338, with the remaining 75 percent, or $1,033,013, to be paid by the town receiving the sand. Stone said DWR staff members are aware the project is unlikely to happen before fall 2019 but extending the period of performance could be granted. He said the county hopes to hear back from both municipalities by early January. In its recommendation, the inlet board raised concerns such as what type of impact the removal of 250,000 cubic yards of sand for the project will have on both Holden Beach’s east end and Oak Island.
Read more » click here

Update –

Corps Puts Limits On Dredged Sand Disposal
Getting permission to dump sand in federally maintained dredged material disposal areas may not be entirely impossible, but a nationwide policy heavily restricts access for North Carolina coastal municipalities and businesses that have long relied on the sites. If the Army Corps of Engineers’ Wilmington District office, along with local and state officials, can come up with ways to work around the policy, all indications are that it could come at a hefty price for non-federal users, including beach towns and private marina owners. The policy indicates that while non-federal projects may apply to dispose of material on a Corps-maintained site if the project meets specific requirements, most federal projects are perpetual, and therefore “few” sites will have extra space. Though the Corps’ nationwide guideline is more than a year old – it became effective Feb. 3, 2017 – word of it has gradually spread along the North Carolina coast.
Read more » click here


Corrections & Amplifications –

The National Flood Insurance Program
The National Flood Insurance Program aims to reduce the impact of flooding on private and public structures. It does so by providing affordable insurance to property owners and by encouraging communities to adopt and enforce floodplain management regulations. These efforts help mitigate the effects of flooding on new and improved structures. Overall, the program reduces the socio-economic impact of disasters by promoting the purchase and retention of general risk insurance, but also of flood insurance, specifically.
Read more » click here

Previously reported – December 2018

National Flood Insurance Program: Reauthorization
Congress must periodically renew the NFIP’s statutory authority to operate. On July 31, 2018, the President signed legislation passed by Congress that extends the National Flood Insurance Program’s (NFIP’s) authorization to November 30, 2018. Congress must now reauthorize the NFIP by no later than 11:59 pm on May 31, 2019.

FEMA and Congress have never failed to honor the flood insurance contracts in place with NFIP policyholders. Should the NFIP’s authorization lapse, FEMA would still have authority to ensure the payment of valid claims with available funds. However, FEMA would stop selling and renewing policies for millions of properties in communities across the nation. Nationwide, the National Association of Realtors estimates that a lapse might impact approximately 40,000 home sale closings per month.

NFIP reauthorization is an opportunity for Congress to take bold steps to reduce the complexity of the program and strengthen the NFIP’s financial framework so that the program can continue helping individuals and communities take the critical step of securing flood insurance. The level of damage from the 2017 hurricanes makes it abundantly clear that FEMA needs a holistic plan to ready the Nation for managing the cost of catastrophic flooding under the NFIP.
Read more » click here

Update –

FEMA resumes selling,
renewing flood insurance policies amid shutdown
Agency rescinds previous decision to not sell or renew policies
Read more » click here


Odds & Ends

 

Brunswick County recently announced

that it will reappraise real property

as of January 1, 2019.

Brunswick County recently announced t will
reappraise real property as
Reappraisal is a process in which all real estate values are assessed at their market value as of a specific date. The purpose of a Reappraisal is to provide equalization among all types of properties. North Carolina General Statutes require each county to conduct a Reappraisal at least once every eight years. Brunswick County conducts a Reappraisal every four year. The last Reappraisal was effective January 1, 2015.

The Board of Commissioners will hold a Special Called Meeting at 3:00 p.m. on Thursday, August 30, 2018 in the Commissioners Chambers located in the David R. Sandifer Administration Building, 30 Government Center Drive, NE, Bolivia, NC.

The purpose of the meeting is to adopt the 2019 reappraisal Schedule of Values. A copy of the Schedule is available to the public in the office of the Brunswick County Tax Assessor, Brunswick County Government Center, 30 Government Center Drive NE, Bolivia, NC from 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Monday thru Friday, and on the County’s website. Click here for more information from the Brunswick County’s FAQ web page on this topic.


This & That


Carolina Bays Parkway Extension

 

The N.C. Department of Transportation and the S.C. Department of Transportation plan to extend Carolina Bays Parkway (S.C. 31) from S.C. 9 in Horry County, S.C., across the North Carolina state line to U.S. 17 in Brunswick County. The project is expected to involve the construction of a multi-lane expressway and may involve both existing roadways and areas on new location.

 SCDOT State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) Project P029554 would extend Carolina Bays Parkway from its current terminus at S.C. 9 in Horry County to the North Carolina state line. NCDOT STIP Project R-5876 would extend Carolina Bays Parkway from the state line to U.S. 17 Shallotte Bypass in Brunswick County.  Carolina Bays Parkway Extension is anticipated to involve the construction of a multilane, full control of access freeway, with part on new location. Full control of access means that access to Carolina Bays Parkway will only be provided via ramps and interchanges. Bridges will be installed at some cross streets and no driveway connections will be allowed.
Read more » click here

Carolina Bays, the $500 million Brunswick County to South Carolina highway project, begins public process
An over half-billion dollar highway project is being designed to streamline transportation between North and South Carolina. The Carolina Bays Parkway Extension would connect S.C. 31 directly to Highway 17 in Brunswick County. Right now, S.C. 31 — Carolina Bays Parkway — runs inland and parallel to Highway 17 in South Carolina along the Myrtle Beach metropolitan area. The 24-mile long parkway ends just 4.5 miles short of the border in South Carolina. Traffic connects S.C. 31 to Highway 17 through a 1.5-mile terminus along S.C. 9. The over half-billion dollar project instead proposes to extend S.C. 31 where it drops off, and connect it to Highway 17 in Brunswick County.
Read more » click here


Factoid That May Interest Only Me –

Oceans Are Warming Faster Than Predicted
Earth’s seas are absorbing excess heat 40 percent faster than previous estimates
Up to 90 percent of the warming caused by human carbon emissions is absorbed by the world’s oceans, scientists estimate. And researchers increasingly agree that the oceans are warming faster than previously thought. Multiple studies in the past few years have found that previous estimates from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change may be too low. A new review of the research, published yesterday in Science, concludes that “multiple lines of evidence from four independent groups thus now suggest a stronger observed [ocean heat content] warming.”

Taken together, the research suggests that the oceans are heating up about 40 percent faster than previously estimated by the IPCC. Since the 1950s, studies generally suggest that the oceans have been absorbing at least 10 times as much energy annually, measured in joules, as humans consume worldwide in a year.
Read more » click here

Ocean Warming Is Accelerating Faster Than Thought,
New Research Finds
Scientists say the world’s oceans are warming far more quickly than previously thought, a finding with dire implications for climate change because almost all the excess heat absorbed by the planet ends up stored in their waters.
Read more » click here

The oceans are warming faster than we thought,
and scientists suggest we brace for impact
The oceans are warming faster than climate reports have suggested, according to a new synthesis of temperature observations published this week. The most recent report from the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change made what turned out to be a very conservative estimate of rise in ocean temperature, and scientists are advising us to adjust our expectations.

“The numbers are coming in 40 to 50 percent [warmer] than the last IPCC report,” said Kevin Trenberth, a climate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and an author on the report, published in Science Magazine on Thursday. Furthermore, Trenberth said, “2018 will be the warmest year on record in the oceans” as 2017 was and 2016 before that. Oceans cover 70 percent of the globe and absorb 93 percent of the planet’s extra heat from climate change. They are responsible for spawning disasters like hurricanes Florence and Maria and generating torrential rainfall via meteorological processes with names like “atmospheric river” and “Pineapple Express.”
Read more » click here

Ice loss from Antarctica has sextupled since the 1970’s
Antarctic glaciers have been melting at an accelerating pace over the past four decades thanks to an influx of warm ocean water — a startling new finding that researchers say could mean sea levels are poised to rise more quickly than predicted in coming decades. The Antarctic lost 40 billion tons of melting ice to the ocean each year from 1979 to 1989. That figure rose to 252 billion tons lost per year beginning in 2009, according to a study published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. That means the region is losing six times as much ice as it was four decades ago, an unprecedented pace in the era of modern measurements. (It takes about 360 billion tons of ice to produce one millimeter of global sea-level rise.)
Read more » click here


Things I Think I Think –

Dining #2Eating out is one of the great little joys of life.

Restaurant Review:
Dinner Club visits a new restaurant once a month. Ratings reflect the reviewer’s reaction to food, ambience and service, with price taken into consideration.
///// October 2018
Name:              Genki Sushi
Cuisine:           Japanese
Location:        4724 New Centre Dr Ste 5, Wilmington, NC
Contact:          910.796.8687 / www.genkisushiwilmington.com
Food:               Average / Very Good / Excellent / Exceptional
Service:           Efficient / Proficient / Professional / Expert
Ambience:      Drab / Plain / Distinct / Elegant
Cost:                 Inexpensive <=17 / Moderate <=22 / Expensive <=27 / Exorbitant <=40
Rating:            Two Stars
/////
Genki Sushi is an authentic Japanese restaurant that is located near Costco in a nondescript strip mall off Market Street. It’s the real deal! It is ranked #3 out of @559 restaurants located in Wilmington. The main focus of the restaurant is on the sushi bar.  Upon entering you receive a warm welcome, the service reflects a commitment to the customer, combined with great Japanese cuisine it makes for a delightful experience.  


Book Review:
Read several books from The New York Times best sellers fiction list monthly
Selection represents this month’s pick of the litter
/////


THE PHARAOH KEY

by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child

Brilliant scientist and master thief Gideon Crew returns for his fifth, and quite possibly his final, adventure in the latest thriller. It takes Gideon from New York City to remote Egypt in search of a treasure. Fans of the Indiana Jones style adventurer will find plenty to like.

 



HBPOIN / Lou’s Views
.
• Gather and disseminate information
. • Identify the issues and determine how they affect you

. • Act as a watchdog
. • Grass roots monthly newsletter since 2008

https://lousviews.com/

12 -Town Meeting

Lou’s Views

“Unofficial” Minutes & Comments


BOC’s Special Meeting 12/18/18

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet
For more information
» click here


1. Discussion and Finalization of Ordinance 18-16, An Ordinance Amending the Holden Beach Code of Ordinances, Chapter 50: Solid Waste (For Possible Adoption at the December 18, 2018 Regular Meeting) – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Solid Waste Staff Study Report
For more information » click here

Previously reported – October 2018
First Draft of Revisions to Town of Holden Beach Code of Ordinances, Chapter 50: Solid Waste
Agenda Packet –
The Board agreed at their August meeting to update the Town’s Code of Ordinances, Section 50: Solid Waste. Attached is the first version of a draft revised ordinance, prepared by Commissioner Kwiatkowski. The Board and residents have the opportunity to comment on the draft at the October meeting or can send emails to me at heather@hbtownhall.com with their suggestions. Once feedback is reviewed and any changes are incorporated, another draft will be prepared for the Board’s consideration.

Current Ordinance:
§50.02 CONTAINER SPECIFICATIONS.
(A) Residential requirements.
(1) Garbage will be kept only in contractor-owned and provided standard, 90-gallon capacity roll-out containers. Each residence is authorized one container; however, additional containers are available from the town for a set monthly fee.
(2) Property owners are responsible to assure they have sufficient 90-gallon containers to properly contain refuse prior to collection. Garbage placed on top of or beside the container(s) will not be placed in non-standard containers.

Proposed Ordinance:
§50.02 CONTAINER SPECIFICATIONS.
(A) Residential requirements.
(1) Garbage will be kept only in contractor-owned and provided standard, 90-gallon capacity roll-out containers. Each residence is authorized one container; however, additional containers are available from the town for a set monthly fee.
(2) Short term rentals, particularly those that are rented as part of the summer rental season, are subject to high numbers of guests resulting in abnormally large volumes of garbage and refuse. This type of occupancy presents a significantly higher impact than homes not used for short term rentals. In interest of public health and sanitation and environmental concerns, all short-term rentals shall have a minimum of one garbage can per two bedrooms. Homes with an odd number of bedrooms shall round up 9for example one to two bedrooms – one trash can; three to four bedrooms – two trash cans; five to six bedrooms – three trash cans; and the like). For purposes of this section, a bedroom is any room which provides a facility for sleeping, including but not limited to, day beds (or other convertibles), sleeper sofas, hide-a-beds, cots or roll away beds.
(3) Property owners are responsible to assure they have sufficient 90-gallon garbage containers to properly contain refuse prior to collection. Garbage or refuse placed on top of or beside the container(s) will not be picked up by waste collection and will be considered a littering offense as outlined in (_?).
(a) Recyclable refuse can be disposed of in standard garbage containers. Alternatively, 90-gallon capacity containers for recyclable materials only are available by contract through the town for a set annual fee. They will be provided to a property in addition to, not in replacement of, the required number of garbage containers.

Current Ordinance:
§50.04 ACCUMULATION AND COLLECTION.
(A) All garbage and household refuse shall be kept in proper containers as required by this chapter and it shall be unlawful for any person to permit garbage to accumulate or remain on any premises longer than is reasonably necessary for its removal. Containers will be located at curbside by the property owner or their representative on designated collection days, and then should be returned to the normal house-side storage location by 6:00 p.m. the day after collection. See subsection (B) for an alternative storage location.
(B) It is the intent of the town that all 90-gallon containers be secured in such a manner either next to non-elevated or underneath elevated houses, except on collection days when they are to be placed at curbside, so that the town street right-of-way remains clear of empty containers, and so that containers are not damaged or overturned by high winds or other occurrences. For those property owners who cannot make arrangements to have their container placed at or removed from curbside, an alternate non-collection day storage arrangement is as follows: A sturdy, wooden three-sided rack of sufficient size to just hold the required container(s) may be constructed by the owner. The rack must be constructed so the opening allows for the easy removal of the 90-gallon container(s) by the collector on collection days; e.g. the container must roll in and roll out of the rack without having to be lifted. The racks shall not be placed more than five feet from the street right-of-way and shall not be placed within the area of the street right-of-way. The rack shall be maintained in a sound and presentable condition. Container(s), on corner lots, will be located so as not to violate §§ 157.060(D)(9) and 157.061(D)(8), Corner Visibility, of the Town Code of Ordinances.
(E) Property owners who are consistently found incapable of properly securing their garbage containers as prescribed above, may receive written notice from the town that they are in violation of town ordinance in that regard. Those so affected will be asked to correct the situation, so they come into compliance with the code or receive a civil fine of $50 per day per offense.

Proposed Ordinance:
§50.04 ACCUMULATION AND COLLECTION.
(A) All garbage and household refuse shall be kept in proper containers as required by this chapter and it shall be unlawful for any person to permit garbage to accumulate or remain on any premises longer than is reasonably necessary for its removal. During the summer rental season (defined for these purposes as the period of time that the garbage collection occurs twice weekly, being mid-May through September). Containers will be located at curbside by the property owner or their representative no earlier than 6pm the evening before designated collection days, and then must be returned to the normal house-side or under house storage location by 6:00 p.m. the day of collection. For the rest of the year, containers will be located at curbside no more than 48 hours before designated collection and then must be returned to the normal storage location by 6:00pm the day after collection.
(B) It is the intent of the town that all 90-gallon containers be secured in such a manner either next to non-elevated or underneath elevated houses, except on collection days when they are to be placed at curbside, so that the town street right-of-way remains clear of empty containers, and so that containers are not damaged or overturned by high winds or other occurrences.
(E) Property owners who are consistently found incapable of properly securing their garbage containers as prescribed in Parts (A) and (B) above, shall after no more than 3 violations receive written notice from the town that they are in violation of town ordinance in that regard. Those so affected will be asked to correct the situation, so they come into compliance with the code or receive a civil fine of $50 per day per offense.

Current Ordinance:
§50.08 RENTAL HOMES.
(A) Rental homes, as defined in Chapter 157, that are rented as part of the summer rental season, are subject to high numbers of guests, resulting in abnormally large volumes of trash. This type of occupancy use presents a significantly higher impact than homes not used for summer rentals. In interest of public health and sanitation and environmental concerns, all rental home shall have a minimum of one trash can per two bedrooms. Homes with an odd number of bedrooms shall round up (for examples one to two bedrooms – one trash can; three to four bedrooms – two trash cans; five – six bedrooms – three trash cans, and the like).
(B) The effective date for all properties referenced in division (A) above shall be March 1, 2008.
(C) Any property found in violation of division (A) above shall be subject to the penalties listed in § 50.99.

Proposed Ordinance:
§50.08 RENTAL HOMES.
(A) Short-term rental homes, are subject to high numbers of guests, resulting in abnormally large volumes of trash. Therefore, all rental home shall have a minimum of one trash can per two bedrooms. Homes with an odd number of bedrooms shall round up (for examples one to two bedrooms – one trash can; three to four bedrooms – two trash cans; five – six bedrooms – three trash cans, and the like).
(B) The effective date for all properties referenced in division (A) above shall be March 1, 2019.
(C) Any property found in violation of division (A) above shall be subject to civil fine of $50 per week per offense.

Current Ordinance:
§50.99 PENALTY.
(A) Criminal. Any person who violates any provision of this chapter, shall be subject to the penalty provided in § 10.99(A) of this code of ordinances.
(B) Civil. In accordance with § 10.99(B) of this code of ordinances, the civil fine for violation of any provision of this chapter, with the exception of § 50.04, shall be $25 per offense.

Proposed Ordinance:
§50.99 PENALTY.
(A) Criminal. Any person who violates any provision of this chapter, with the exception of § 50.04, for which no penalty is otherwise provided shall be subject to the penalty provided in § 10.99(A) of this code of ordinances.
(B) Civil. In accordance with § 10.99(B) of this code of ordinances, the civil fine for violation of any provision of this chapter, shall be $50 per offense.


Agree that we have a number of issues that need to be addressed. Unfortunately, I don’t think that there are any simple solutions. A number of the proposed changes create a whole series of unintended consequences. Really feel we need to work through this with a series of workshops that include all stakeholders. The self-imposed deadline to complete project before rental companies do their brochures is simply not going to happen. In order to avoid the brouhaha that we just had with the System Development Fees the public needs to actively participate in the process. The Board is asking that all stakeholders review the information and give constructive input. Any changes are bound to have ramifications; you need to know what that means to you. This ordinance if adopted as written is going to have significant negative repercussions for many property owners. In order to be familiar with all of the proposed changes I strongly recommend that you read pages 70 through 74 in the Agenda Packet.

Previously reported – November 2018
Agenda Packet –
TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH ORDINANCE 18-16
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE HOLDEN BEACH CODE OF ORDINANCES, CHAPTER 50: SOLID WASTE

BE IT ORDAINED BY the Mayor and Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach, North Carolina that the Holden Beach Code of Ordinances, Chapter 50: Solid Waste be amended as follows:

Section One: Amend Chapter 50: Solid Waste to read as follows:

CHAPTER 50: SOLID WASTE Section
50.01 Definitions
50.02 Container specifications
50.03 Burning or burying of garbage regulated
50.04 Accumulation and collection
50.05 Collections prohibited
50.06 Yard waste
50.07 Transporting waste materials; covering during transport
50.08 Rental homes
50.99 Penalty

§50.01 DEFINITIONS.
For the purpose of this chapter, the following definitions shall apply unless the context clearly indicates or requires a different meaning.

BUILDING MATERIAL SCRAP. All scrap material from the construction, reconstruction, remodeling or repair of a building, walkway, driveway, sign or other structure, including, but not limited to, excavated earth, tree stumps, rocks, gravel, bricks, plaster, concrete, lumber, insulation, fixtures (e.g., commodes, sinks) or wrappings for materials or any other materials necessary for the construction, reconstruction, remodeling or repair of a building.

GARBAGE. All animal, fruit and vegetable matter, all small cans, glassware, crockery, bags, and other small containers in which matter has been left or stored.

LARGE HOUSEHOLD ITEMS. Accessories or fittings for a particular use inside, outside or around a house including but not limited to tables and chairs; sofas and recliners; bed frames; dressers; mattresses and box springs; small electronics such as computers and televisions; refrigerators; ovens and microwave ovens; washing and drying machines.

PUTRESClBLE WASTE. Solid waste that contains organic matter capable of being decomposed by microorganisms and of such a character and proportion as to cause obnoxious odors and to be capable of attracting or providing food for birds or animals.

REFUSE. All other types and kinds of materials intended to be discarded, scrapped, or otherwise disposed of.

RECYCLABLE REFUSE. Types and kinds of materials intended to be discarded, scrapped or otherwise disposed of that are defined as recyclable material under the current waste collection contract, e.g., cardboard; newspaper; magazines; small metal and glass containers and certain type of plastic containers in which matter has been stored and possibly residues left.

SUMMER RENTAL SEASON. The period of time that garbage collection occurs twice weekly per town contract.

YARD WASTE. All wastes pertaining to a landscaped/managed property, including but not limited to tree limbs, leaves, shrubbery, weeds, plants or grass.

§50.02 CONTAINER SPECIFICATIONS.

(A) Residential requirements.

(1) Garbage will be kept only in contractor-owned and provided standard, 90- gallon capacity roll-out containers. Each residence is authorized one container; however, additional containers are available for a set monthly fee.

(2) Recyclable refuse can be disposed of in standard garbage containers. Alternatively, 90-gallon capacity containers for recyclable materials only are available by contract through the town for a set annual fee. They will be provided to a property in addition to, not in replacement of, the required number of garbage containers.

(3) Property owners are responsible to assure they have sufficient 90-gallon containers to properly contain refuse prior to collection. Garbage placed on top of or beside the container(s) will not be picked up by the contractor, nor will garbage placed in non-standard containers.

(B) Commercial requirements.

(1) All commercial establishments catering to the public in such a manner as to create refuse shall be required to place an adequate number of refuse containers in such positions and locations as to encourage their use.

(2) All such commercial related containers shall be maintained in a sound and presentable condition.

(C) No person shall throw, place, or deposit any garbage or refuse of any kind, in any place or in any public or private property, except in approved containers or as otherwise provided in accordance with the provisions of this section.

(D) Containers on town-owned property and other public areas are for the use of the town and for the general use of residents and visitors using the public areas. It shall be unlawful for anyone otherwise to place commercial or residential waste or refuse into such containers.

§50.03 BURNING OR BURYING OF GARBAGE REGULATED.

It shall be unlawful to bum or bury garbage or trash for the purpose of disposal unless a special permit has been issued by the Town Police Department.

§50.04 ACCUMULATION AND COLLECTION.

(A) All garbage and household refuse shall be kept in proper containers as required by this chapter and it shall be unlawful for any person to permit garbage to accumulate or remain on any premises longer than is reasonably necessary for its removal. It is the intent of the town that all containers be secured in such a manner either next to non-elevated or underneath elevated houses, except on collection days when they are to be placed at curbside, so that the town street right-of-way remains clear of empty containers, and so that containers are not damaged or overturned by high winds or other occurrences. Containers will be located at curbside no earlier than 6:00p.m. the evening before designated collection days during the summer rental season. For the rest of the year containers will be located at curbside no more than 48 hours before the designated collection. All containers should be returned to the normal house-side storage location by 6:00 p.m. the day after collection.

(B) It shall be the duty of every owner or occupant of every building or premises where garbage or refuse exists, to reasonably and regularly clean the 90-gallon containers and other legal refuse collection containers.

(C) The owners, occupants and lessees of all property, jointly and severally, are required to control all refuse, placing such refuse in proper containers and/or arranging for collection or other disposal disposition in accordance with the provisions of this chapter.

(D) Garbage and household refuse will be collected and removed from the aforesaid containers or cans in accordance with the schedule set forth in the garbage collection service contract, executed independently from this chapter.

(E) This chapter shall be enforced by the town either by civil proceedings or by removing and disposing of litter according to the provisions and procedures for abatement of litter as provided in this chapter and as prescribed by G.S. 160A-174, 160A-175, 160A-192, 160A-193, and 160A-303.1, including the provisions for notice and hearings provided or referred to therein.

§50.05 COLLECTIONS PROHIBITED.

All matter, refuse, and materials such as industrial refuse, building materials and scraps, tree trimmings, walkway scraps, or any other refuse from building or remodeling, large containers, or large household items shall not be accepted or picked up as part of the regular garbage collection service contract.

§50.06 YARD WASTE

Yard waste will be accepted under certain conditions and at defined times under a contract separate from the standard waste collection contract. Permissible yard waste must not be placed at roadside for collection more than one week prior to a scheduled collection. Property owners who are consistently found in violation may receive written notice from the town that they are in violation of town ordinance in that regard. Those so affected will be asked to correct the situation so they come into compliance with the code or receive a civil fine of $50 per day per offense.

§50.07 TRANSPORTING WASTE MATERIALS; COVERING DURING TRANSPORT.

All persons transporting waste material, construction material, or any manner of loose materials over the public or private roadways in the town shall insure that such materials are not lost or scattered on or along the rights-of-way of such roadways. These materials shall be securely covered during transit in such manner as to prevent the loss thereof from the transporting vehicle.

§50.08 RENTAL HOMES.

(A) Rental homes, as defined in Chapter 157, that are rented as part of the summer rental season, are subject to high numbers of guests, resulting in abnormally large volumes of trash. This type of occupancy use presents a significantly higher impact than homes not used for summer rentals. In interest of public health and sanitation and environmental concerns, all rental home shall have a minimum of one trash can per two bedrooms. Homes with an odd number of bedrooms shall round up (for examples one to two bedrooms – one trash can; three to four bedrooms – two trash cans; five- six bedrooms- three trash cans, and the like).

(B) Any property found in violation of division (A) above shall be subject to the penalties listed in § 50.99.

§50.99 PENALTY.

(A) Criminal. Any person who violates any provision of this chapter shall be subject to the penalty provided in § 10.99(A) of this code of ordinances.

(B) Civil. In accordance with § 10.99(B) of this code of ordinances, the civil fine for violation of any provision of this chapter shall be $50 per offense.

Commissioner Kwiatkowski worked with both the town staff and the town attorney to put together a final draft version of the amended Ordinance. They attempted to be clear, concise, and have an enforceable ordinance. Final version will be presented at the next meeting. If adopted, enforcement will begin on May of 2019.

The Board agreed to have a Solid Waste Workshop before the next BOC’s Regular Meeting in December. The Board is asking that all stakeholders actively participate in the process by reviewing the information and giving them constructive input.

Update –
The proposed changes attempt to address some of these issues. It will have significant repercussions for many property owners. The goal is to service the most people in the best way possible. It was not the intent of the Board to create a revenue stream from fines but rather to address these issues. The good news is the Board received a significant amount of correspondence and feedback. Unfortunately, none of the rental / property management companies participated in the process. Education is the initial phase, attempting to modify behavior, where they will strive to improve compliance. Letters will be sent to property owners for noncompliance issues. Second round of letters will be a warning that fines will eventually be imposed, the penalties will not be enforced until May of 2019. Thereafter the formal process begins, and fines will be initiated. Well this was supposed to be the final version of the proposed amended ordinance; but apparently, it is still a work in progress. The actual vote to adopt Ordinance will take place at the Regular Meeting tonight.

2. Discussion and Decision on Preferred Rollback Option for the Town – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Previously reported –
August 2018
Rollback Service
@>1,200 or 50% includes all the properties on Ocean Boulevard only          (Ballpark figure)
Rollbacks should be for everyone or for no one
Rollback of full cans will have all kinds of unintended consequences
Why do we do this for some properties but not others?
Why are we not charging to provide this service?
Should be offered to all properties with a user fee charged for those that want the service

Previously reported – November 2018
The Board agreed to have a Solid Waste Workshop before the next BOC’s Regular Meeting in December.

Update –
Agenda Packet –
ROLLBACK OPTIONS SUMMARY
    1. As is, OBW only, BPART                                                                     Yes, stop
        a) not level benefit
.         b) no enforcement
.            NO, continue

.     2. No service, owner responsibility                                                             Yes, stop
        a)
difficulties for owners to organize
        b)
doesn’t resolve near term safety and esthetics issues
        c)
multiple providers possible, adding complexity
.             NO, continue

.     3. Whole island Tuesday & Saturday/ May-Sep, BPART                          Yes, stop
        a)
doesn’t address second homeowner needs
        b)
doesn’t address significant rentals “off season”
.         c)
likely BPART budget increase
            NO, continue

    4. Whole island Tuesday year-round & Saturday May-Sep with pay for options
.       A)
BPART only
        a)
BPART budget increase                                                                     Yes, stop
           NO, continue
     
B) BPART season, General Fund off season                                           Yes, stop
         a)
Likely BPART budget increase
.          b)
general fund budget increase
.             NO, continue

.      C) Combined BPART and fee, break even                                               Yes, stop
        a)
flat fee (same for all dwellings, irrespective of # bins)
.         b)
graduated fees dependent on number of bins
          •
grouping or absolute
         c)
Others?
            NO, continue

     D. Other pay for options?
            NO, continue

Town Manager – David Hewett
I have been able to develop a budget estimate of $85,000 to provide Town-wide rollback service.

Property Owner – David Tart
As you consider the issues related to solid waste, please consider that part­ time residents are “full-time” property owners. There is no legal or tax distinction between full-time local residents versus part-time residents. However, part-time owners represent a disenfranchised group of owners who are taxed but cannot vote in the jurisdiction.

The proposed solid waste ordinance is workable for most full-time local residents. But it does not provide any workable alternatives for part-time residents who cannot make arrangements for the specified roll-out/roll-back time parameters. Many part-time residents do not have anyone available to provide this service (such as a rental agency). In our neighborhood, we have only a few full-time residents. I can’t reasonably ask or expect them to commit to being my “garbage man” /solid waste container manager. There is, to my knowledge, no commercial vendor currently offering such a service.

The goals of a new ordinance should be to handle solid waste with containers at the roadside for a minimal time and provide part-time owners a workable method to meet the ordinances parameters. 

Property Owner – Irvin Woods
My concern is the proposed roll-back regulations is “a solution in search of a problem” which will create unintended, unexpected consequences and unnecessary costs to property owners.

Property Owner – Jayne Bremer
I, too, am a part time resident, full time home owner who pays taxes without voting privileges. TRASH is everyone’s concern.

Update –
They all agreed that rollback service should be provided for the whole island year-round and that all bins will be rollbacked, empty or not. Rollout is a separate issue, it was not addressed and will be discussed at a later date.


BOC’s Regular Meeting 12/18/18

Board of Commissioners’ Agenda Packet
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1. Public Comments on Agenda Items

Tom Myers speaking on behalf of the HBPOA
My name is Tom Myers, I live at 301 OBW and I am the President of the HBPOA.  I am here tonight speaking on behalf of the HBPOA regarding agenda items 14 and 15 on solid waste and rollback services.

The mission of the HBPOA is to represent the property owners of Holden Beach regarding their common issues and concerns.  Trash service is one of these issues, since it impacts 100% of the property owners on the island. Based on our most recent analysis: 89% of property owners do not live here fulltime, and 30% of these property owners do not even live in the state of North Carolina.  More than half of the owners do not rent their properties, and for those that do, they are predominantly seasonal rentals.

In general, property owners are concerned about the additional burdens that might be placed on them, and the fact they could incur severe penalties (and possibly even criminal violations) for things that are out of their control.  They feel they pay property taxes and are therefore entitled to Town services (which includes trash pickup) and that the Town needs to consider the unique demographics of the island. 

There are neighborhoods here with a concentration of permanent residents who all know each other and can help each other out.  However, the majority of the island (especially along Ocean Blvd), has a high percentage of non-resident owners who don’t always know each other.  Most of these property owners come here rarely and randomly – and not always on the weekends.

When they do come, they generate trash, and they typically roll their cans to the street before heading back home.  If they live on Ocean Blvd, the Town has been rolling their empty cans back for them.  If they live on another street, they are at the mercy of someone else rolling their can back, or else it stays there until their next visit – which could be days, weeks or months later.  If a full can is rolled back, it could sit at their house for days, weeks, or months.

These property owners are being considered villains and viewed as people who deserve to be criminally punished.  In reality, their actions are simply due to their situation; their only “crime” is not being here full time. 

The HBPOA periodically conducts opinion surveys.  We did one on recycling, but we haven’t had time to conduct one on trash rollout or rollback services.  We have tried to communicate information about your proposed ordinance and have received a lot of feedback – much of which I have forwarded to you.  However, collecting feedback takes time, and it is impossible to get any feedback on decisions that were made this morning before you vote on implementing them this evening – especially given the timing of a Tuesday, one week before Christmas.

The HBPOA is willing to help you communicate your expectations of property owners and provide them the information they will need to comply with your ordinance.  We just hope it is something that everyone is capable of doing, and that you are being fair to the non-resident property owners who represent the vast majority of our tax base.   


2. Guest Speaker, FOCUS Fiber Optic Service Presentation – Kris Ward, Director of Business Development, ATMC

Kris was here to announce good news tonight regarding ATMC fiber optic project. This enhancement will allow their customers better access to communication services. They plan to spend 5.5 million dollars upgrading the island to fiber optic to the homes here. The project is scheduled to start in the first quarter of 2019 and is expected to take the better part of a year to complete. More information is available online by visiting the ATMC website.

Benefits of Fiber to the Home (FTTH)
POWER / SPEED:
FTTH has the ability to deliver more bandwidth and faster broadband speeds than any other connection.
SERVICE:
FTTH is backed by award-winning customer service from ATMC.
VALUE:
Research shows that a home in an FTTH community is worth more than a similar home in a non-FTTH community.
RELIABILITY / STABILITY:
The fiber optic technology that powers FTTH is resistant to corrosion, not susceptible to lightning damage, and has a longer life expectancy than regular coaxial cables.
FLEXIBILITY:
Because of the nearly limitless connection, FTTH homes are better-equipped for the communications and entertainment technologies of tomorrow.
ENVIRONMENTAL:
FTTH is green, energy-efficient, and less intrusive to the neighborhood.


3. Discussion and Possible Nomination of Board Member to the Mayor Pro Team Position – Per Town Ordinance

Previously reported –
Per Town Ordinance §30.05 and North Carolina General Statute §160A-70
§30.05 MAYOR PRO TEMPORE AND EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
The BOC shall elect from one of its members: (1) a Mayor Pro Tempore, and (2) an Executive Secretary, who shall not be the same member. The normal term of office of both the Mayor Pro Tempore and the Executive Secretary shall be one year, commencing at the first regular meeting in December; provide, however that each shall serve at the pleasure of the BOC.

The Mayor Pro Tempore shall discharge the duties and exercise the powers and authority of Mayor in the absence, disability, disqualification of the Mayor and during a vacancy in the office of Mayor; provided his or her rights and duties as BOC shall remain unimpaired; except he or she shall receive the salary or expenses of Mayor when serving in that capacity.  No additional oath of office shall be required of the Mayor Pro Tempore upon assuming the duties of the Mayor beyond that oath taken at the time of appointment to Mayor Pro Tempore.

Mayor Pro Tem is elected by the Board of Commissioners and is not necessarily the person with the most votes in the general election. The selection of Mayor Pro Tem is at the discretion of the other elected commissioners. Although traditionally the person with the most votes has been selected the rules do not require it.

Update –
Discussion and Nomination of Board Member to the Mayor Pro Tem Position
Commissioner Freer made a motion to nominate John Fletcher for Mayor Pro Tem
Commissioner Fletcher was elected as Mayor Pro Tem

A decision was made – Approved (3-2)


4. Discussion and Possible Nomination of Board Member to the Executive Secretary Position – Per Town Ordinance

Previously reported –
Per Town Ordinance §30.05 and North Carolina General Statute §160A-70
Ordinance 15-08 amended Section 30.05 adding an Executive Secretary position
§30.05 MAYOR PRO TEMPORE AND EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
The BOC shall elect from one of its members: (1) a Mayor Pro Tempore, and (2) an Executive Secretary, who shall not be the same member. The normal term of office of both the Mayor Pro Tempore and the Executive Secretary shall be one year, commencing at the first regular meeting in December; provide, however that each shall serve at the pleasure of the BOC.

The Executive Secretary shall be responsible for: (1) creating the agenda for each regular and special meeting of the BOC, and (2) assembling all supporting agenda package materials, in consultation with the other members of the BOC and the Town Manager and Town Attorney, as applicable. The Executive Secretary shall timely deliver the same to the Town Clerk for copying, delivery and publication in accordance with these ordinances and the Rules of Procedure provided for herein. The Town Clerk and Town Manager shall provide logistical and advisory support to the Executive Secretary in performing these functions and the Town Attorney shall provide legal interpretation or support as requested by the Executive Secretary. No notice of any regular or special meeting of the BOC, nor any agenda or agenda package materials with respect thereto shall be delivered or published by the Town Clerk without the express prior authorization of the Executive Secretary.

Update –
Discussion and Nomination of Board Member to the Executive Secretary Position
Commissioner Butler made a motion to nominate Peter Freer for Executive Secretary
Commissioner Freer was elected as Executive Secretary

A decision was made – Approved (3-2)


5. Discussion and Possible Action on Bridge Rehabilitation Project – Town Manager Hewett

Previously reported – August 2018
Agenda Packet –
Safety Railing for the Holden Beach Bridge
It is the intent of the Department of Transportation to provide a bicycle/pedestrian railing atop the Town’s concrete bridge barrier, as an added safety improvement. They would like feedback from the Town on a preferred option for the safety rail. It seems as though they need an answer sooner than our normal meeting schedule allows.

Bridge Health Index
NCDOT is committed to measuring and improving its overall performance. One of the department’s goals is to make the state’s infrastructure last longer by setting a target for at least 70 percent of bridges rated to be in good condition or better. Good means that the bridge can safely carry the typical-sized commercial or passenger vehicles for that route. To achieve this goal, the department uses a data-driven strategy to improve the overall condition of all bridges in North Carolina by focusing taxpayer dollars where they’re needed most.

North Carolina Department of Transportation selected Holden Beach bridge as a High Value Bridge. They have allocated funding to make safety improvements and improve the expected life expectancy of the bridge. Work includes adding bicycle / pedestrian railing a safety improvement and also do basic repair to the substructure. NCDOT will pay the entire estimated $1.5 million to $2.0 million cost of the project. Work on the bridge is scheduled to begin in September. The estimated time frame to complete the work is the better part of eighteen months.

Chad Kimes Deputy Division Engineer informed the Board that NCDOT intends to install a bicycle / pedestrian railing on top of the concrete bridge barrier, which does not meet current safety standards, as a safety improvement. He asked the Board for feedback regarding what look did they want. The Board was given the opportunity to choose whether the rails would be vertical or horizontal and also select the color.   

The Board chose to have three horizontal railings with an aluminum finish atop the concrete bridge barrier.

 Town Manager David Hewett said the bridge was never intended for bicycle and pedestrian traffic and putting up the railing up may give people the wrong impression. Commissioner Butler agreed with David and voted against the motion essentially saying we were creating an attractive nuisance. David asked whether the funds could be used to pave Ocean Boulevard West. Chad said the monies for resurfacing and for the bridge project are separate, so NO.

Agenda Packet – December
Bridge Rehabilitation Project
As you may recall a couple of months ago, we presented two bridge railing options at your Commissioners meeting in reference to the Holden Beach bridge rehabilitation project, for your review and consideration. The Town chose the three horizontal rail design as shown in the attachment titled “Holden Rail Retrofit ­ Options 1 and 2.” Upon further consideration, we requested our design consultant provide a third railing option for the bridge rail retrofit, which I have attached, titled “Holden Rail Retrofit – Option 3.” The idea for this option came from the latest Surf City bridge design, which includes a smaller vertical “picket” than the option provided at the council meeting and may provide greater visibility. The support posts in this option are modified slightly as well.

The Town’s prior decision is still a perfectly valid option and it is not our intent to complicate matters with this proposal, we just wanted to extend this option to you, since it is also being extended to Ocean Isle Beach. We are currently under contract with Coastal Gunite Construction to perform the rehab work and will need to provide them with your choice of the 3 options.  If you will please review the attachments and provide us with a response by Friday, December 14, 2018, if at all possible, it will be greatly appreciated and can help the project stay on schedule.

Update –
The contract has been awarded, NCDOT plan to spend 3.3 million dollars rehabilitating the bridge, part of the High Value Bridge Program, including adding safety railings which brings the wall from 27” to 48” to meet current safety criteria. The project is scheduled to start in January and is expected to take through October of 2019 to complete. The BOC’s selected the new third option which includes two horizontal aluminum bars with thin vertical pickets.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

The Surf City railing shown below is what we are getting minus the top horizontal bar.


6. Receipt of Inlet and Beach Protection Board Report – Commissioner Freer

Agenda Packet –

The Inlet and Beach Protection Board (IBPB) met November 29 and the following issues and topics were addressed:
Annual Beach Monitoring Report: Fran Way of ATM gave an in-depth presentation and answered questions about the report.

Comprehensive Long-Term Plan:  A working framework for the long-term plan was discussed and agreed upon. Sample reports will be distributed, and members will be thinking about which areas they would like to participate in.

Status of the Beach and Inlets: Staff provided an overview of conditions and issues relative to the beach strand and inlets in the aftermath of Hurricanes Florence and Michael. The Board was updated on the LFI situation and voted to schedule a special meeting. The County is looking for feedback in an expedited manner.

Community Engagement Newsletter: To meet the goal of serving as a link to the community as specified in the establishing ordinance, a regular (possibly quarterly) community newsletter will be created and distributed.

Meetings:  Members of the Board attended the NC Beach, Inlet and Waterway Association Annual Meeting, the Atlantic lntercoastal Waterway Association Meetings and the CRC meetings.

Previously reported –
Ordinance 18-02 established the Inlet and Beach Protection Board
The Ordinance requires a written report from this Board

Update –
No issues, accepted report


7. Police Report – Chief Wally Layne

Police Patch
So far so good, it’s been fairly quiet
We are not experiencing any major crime wave at the moment


Reminder that we all serve as the eyes and ears for law enforcement.
If you know something, hear something, or see something –
call 911 and let police deal with it.


Neighborhood Watch

  • Need to look out for each other and report any suspicious activity
  • Call 911 if you see or hear anything suspicious
  • Fill out Keep Check Request Form if you will be out of town
  • Submit completed Property Registration Form
  • Pickup copy of Protecting Your Home

Crime prevention 101 – Don’t make it easy for them
. a) Don’t leave vehicles unlocked
. b)
Don’t leave valuables in your vehicles
. c)
Lock your doors & windows – house, garage, storage areas and sheds

Keep Check Request Form
. a) Complete the form and return it to the Police Department
. b)
Officers check your property in your absence
.

Property Registration Form

. a)
Record of items in your home that have a value of over $100
. b)
Complete the form and return it to the Police Department


8. Discussion and Possible Action – Construction Management Services of the Vacuum Sewer System #4 Upgrade Status Report – Public Works Director Clemmons

Previously reported –
December 2017
McGill and Associates were commissioned to perform a Sewer Study to evaluate sewer system vulnerability reducing measures. A fiscal year 2017-2018 budget appropriation of $1,413,000 was made to accommodate total programmatic expenses of Lift Station #4 improvements. Green Engineering firm was awarded the $158,000 contract for Sewer System #4 upgrade. Green Engineering will provide all engineering services required to construct a vulnerability reducing structure of Lift Station #4.

Previously reported –
April 2018
Four (4) meetings have been held between staff and the engineering firm to date. The final plans were delivered to the Town and have been reviewed and approved by the Building Inspector. Deliverables – Timeline has been revised. Buildings were designed in the same style as Town Hall. We are currently on schedule, but Chris cautioned that it was still early in the game. The Board requested monthly updates, reporting on whether we remained on schedule and within budget.

Previously reported –
May 2018
We’ve had a slight setback, we did not receive the three (3) bids required to move forward. Officially we accepted no bids, the two bids submitted will be held and opened upon the completion of the second go round. Chris was a little surprised and disappointed since their appeared to be a lot of interest when they held meeting with vendors. We will need to start the bid process over. The protocols on the second bid process do not require the three bids but the caveat is we can only consider quality bids.

Previously reported –
June 2018
BOC’s SPECIAL MEETING / May 23, 2018
Approved award of the Lift Station #4 upgrade contract to T.A. Loving Company in the amount of $1,205,000

Total project cost went from $1,413,000 to $1,695,700 or a $282,700 difference
Contingency funds were reduced from $157,400 to $52,480 or a $104,920 difference
Bottomline, the project cost just went up $387,620 ($282,700 + $104,920) or @27% (Yikes!)

A pre-construction meeting is scheduled for June 28th
We should have a tentative construction start date then

Previously reported –
July 2018
A pre-construction meeting was held on June 28th
The contractor was given notice to proceed
Mobilization is scheduled for the first week of August
Concerns:
. 1) Time to get materials – delay waiting for foundation steel
. 2)
Storm Season

Previously reported –
August 2018
Reviewed progress to date, despite the rain they are still on schedule, gave some tentative project timelines. It’s all good!

Previously reported –
October 2018
Making good progress, despite the two storm events they are still on track to complete project on schedule.

Previously reported – November 2018
Town hired Green Engineering for construction management services. Leo Green gave a brief status report. It’s all good, we are still on budget and on schedule. Project tentative completion date is the middle of January well before the tourist season begins. Leo meets with the town staff monthly to discuss any issues and keep everyone informed about the status of the project. Building Inspections Director Evans gave them two thumbs up for the work that has been done so far; really high praise coming from Timbo.

Update –
Tentative startup date is now January 15th, station will be fully operational after that date. Expectation is that they should have everything wrapped up by March of 2019.


9. Discussion on the Final Proposal of Waste Ordinance and Possible Adoption of Ordinance 18-16, An Ordinance Amending the Holden Beach Code of Ordinances, Chapter 50: Solid Waste – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Additional changes were made tonight as follows:
    1)
Added language giving property owner some flexibility
.     2)
Changed language that decriminalized noncompliance

 §50.08 RENTAL HOMES.
(A) Homes with an odd number of bedrooms shall round up (for examples one to two bedrooms – one trash can; three to four bedrooms – two trash cans; five- six bedrooms- three trash cans, and the like). In instances where three trash cans or more are required, one can may be substituted with a contractor approved recycling bin.

(B) Any property found in violation of division (A) above shall be subject to the penalties listed in § 50.99.

§50.99 PENALTY.
(A) Criminal. Any person who violates any provision of this chapter shall not be subject to the penalty provided in § 10.99(A) of this code of ordinances.

Commissioner Kwiatkowski worked with both the town staff and the town attorney to put together a final draft version of the amended Ordinance. There were lots of variables to be considered and they tried to address all the issues and concerns that were identified. Kudos to Pat for taking the bull by the horns, at times it seemed like she was herding cats, but due to her perseverance she managed to drag this Ordinance across the finish line.

A decision was made – Approved (4-1)

In order to be familiar with all of the changes that were made I strongly recommend that you read Ordinance 18-16. Any changes are bound to have ramifications; therefore, you need to know what that means to you. I encourage you to go to the Town website to see the final version that they adopted.


10. Discussion and Possible Action to Implement Board Rollback Decisions from the December 18th Workshop– Commissioner Kwiatkowski

They all agreed that rollback service should be provided for the whole island year-round and that all bins will be rollbacked, empty or not. So, this then became a budget issue. How do we fund this? They finally decided that they would continue to tap the BPART account fund for approximately $35,000 and the additional estimated $50,000 cost would come out of general funds which comes from property taxes.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Rollout is a separate issue, it was not addressed and will be discussed at a later date. It still isn’t clear what property owners are supposed to do with their full trash cans if they leave the island before the allowed rollout window. Rollback of full cans also was not addressed, and it will have all kinds of unintended consequences especially at properties where owners are gone for an extended period of time.


11.Discussion and Possible Approval of Amending the Fee Schedule – Town Manager Hewett
.  a) Resolution 18-13, Resolution Amending the Holden Beach Fee Schedule (Recycling Charges)
.  b)
Resolution 18-14, Resolution Amending the Holden Beach Fee Schedule (Special Event Fees)

Agenda Packet –
The Town needs to implement two fee schedule changes. Currently the Town is not assessed a processing fee for recyclables. As reflected in the current contract between the Town and Waste Industries, beginning in January 2019 the Town will be assessed a processing fee that is tied to the best negotiated agreements with local processors. Waste Industries has informed us the increase for the upcoming year will be $14.92 per bin. The fee schedule needs to be updated to reflect the change. Resolution 18-13 increases the fee by $14.92. The information in Resolution   18-14 regarding Special Event Fees was discussed at the November meeting. It includes the language change suggestion that was approved in the motion. Both resolutions require changes to the fee schedule.  Recommendation is to adopt the fee schedule changes by adopting Resolution 18-13 and Resolution 18-14.
Residential Curbside Trash (second pickup) – The charge for once per week secondary residential curbside trash to CUSTOMER from CONTRACTOR shall be $6.58 per month per cart. CONTRACTOR will provide one 95 (ninety-five) gallon cart for MSW to each address using the Services. CUSTOMER may request additional carts for residents. Additional carts will be billed by the number of carts requested multiplied by the monthly rate of $8.40 and billed directly to property owner. This pickup service will be provided on Saturdays for the months of June, July, August & September.

Curbside Recycle – CONTRACTOR will provide a 95 gallon recycle container for the voluntary program for a price of $4.00 per month per property owner. There will be no processi ng fees charged for recyclables through December 31, 2018.  Beginning January 1, 2019, procesing fees/payment will be tied to the best negotiated agreements with local processors. These fees/payments will be mutually agreed upon but not reasonably withheld. Waste Industries will supply documentation a part of the process of negotiations.

RESOLUTION 18-13
RESOULUTION AMENDING THE HOLDEN BEACH FEE SCHEDULE

WHEREAS, As reflected in the Solid Waste and Recyclables Collection. Transportation and Disposal Agreement between the Town and Waste Industries, beginning in January 2019 the Town will be assessed a processing fee based on the best negotiated agreements with local processers; and

WHEREAS,
the increased annual cost per bin due to the new costs is$14.92, increasing the total assessed to $82.48; and

WHEREAS, the Holden Beach Fee Schedule needs to be updated to reflect the addition of the processing fee.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach, North Carolina does hereby amend the fee schedule to reflect the new recycling fee of $82.48 per bin.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that this fee should be effective for recycling  services beginning on January 1, 2019.


RESOLUTION 18-14
RESOULUTION AMENDING THE HOLDEN BEACH FEE SCHEDULE

WHEREAS, The Parks & Recreation Advisory Board reviewed race recommendations for the Town of Holden Beach; and

WHEREAS, The Parks & Recreation Advisory Board recommended Implementation of a special event fee to offset the cost incurred to the Town for such races; and

WHEREAS, The Board of Commissioners reviewed the proposal in November and added language to reduce or waive if appropriate.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach, North Carolina does hereby amend the fee schedule to reflect the addition of a $1,500 special event fee for races, in which the Town has the discretion to reduce or waive the fee if appropriate.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that if the number of Police Officers exceeds five, an additional fee will be charged.

Previously reported – November 2018
The staff would recommend the adoption of the above motion to charge a special event fee of $1,500 in which the Town has the discretion to waive the fee for non-profits.
Currently we are not getting any revenue from these events, but we do incur significant costs. Essentially, we are looking to charge the event sponsor enough to offset the costs. It will be back on the agenda next month with an adjustment to our fee schedule.

Update –
Resolution 18-13, the addition of a $1,500 special event fee for races
Resolution 18-14, processing fee of $14.92, increasing the recycling fee to $82.48 per bin

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


12. Discussion and Possible Action on Poyner Spruill LLP Proposal Concerning Consulting Services – Town Manager Hewett
. a)
Ordinance 18-17, An Ordinance Amending Ordinance No. 18-10, The Revenues and Appropriations Ordinance for Fiscal Year 2018 – 2019 (Amendment No. 4)

Previously reported – October 2018
It has been the Mayor’s position that we need to hire a professional consulting firm because we need representation on multiple topics at the local, state and national levels of government.

McIntyre did a brief recap of presentation that was made earlier in the day on what they can do for us. The consensus appeared to be that we need someone to speak on our behalf and they can make it happen.

Questions that remained to be answered are as follows:
. 1)
What are we going to get?
. 2)
How much will it cost?

Agenda Packet – November
Scope of Engagement
We have agreed to advise and assist you with governmental matters and legal issues that arise and the Client hereby engages Poyner Spruill LLP to perform the following services in accordance with the terms and conditions set forth in this Agreement: assisting with the Client’s efforts to secure sufficient federal funding and timely regulatory and project management for federal shore protection projects located at Holden Beach, North Carolina, as more particularly described and listed and incorporated herein by reference in Exhibit A, which is attached. The Client acknowledges and agrees that Poyner Spruill LLP does not have control over third party decision makers, and, that Poyner Spruill makes no representations, warranties, or guarantees that it can achieve any particular results. Poyner Spruill LLP shall act in good faith with the necessary due diligence in connection with its performance of the services described herein. Two local meetings with the Council and two trips to Washington, D.C., per 12-month period, as well as a monthly status report, are included in the services to be provided. Our work will be primarily on the federal level It is understood that The Ferguson Group will be assisting our firm on your behalf with regard to the services above-described. If the need arises for specialized assistance, such as grant writing or for legislative monitoring/research, then fees and costs incurred for such services will be billed separately to the client.

Retainer
The retainer for our services will be $9,500.00 per month.

Fees and Expenses
Attached to this letter is a copy of our Standard Terms of Representation which would control such matters. If an appearance before an adjudicating body of either of the executive or judicial branches is requested, then services may be provided by our firm at an hourly rate, which currently could range from $375 to $575 per hour. If needed, time devoted by paralegals would be charged at hourly rates ranging from $175-$280 per hour.

OPTION 1
– Federal issues related to Lockwood Folly Inlet Maintenance;
– Federal issues related to beach renourishment;
– Federal issues related to the General Re-evaluation Report;
– Examination of Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funding possibilities;
– Identification of grant opportunities for a second water tower for the Town and review of grant applications

OPTION 2
– Federal issues related to Lockwood Folly Inlet Maintenance;
– Federal issues related to beach renourishment;
– Federal issues related to the General Re-evaluation Report;
– Examination of Hazard Mitigation Grant Program funding possibilities;
– Identification of grant opportunities for a second water tower for the Town and review of grant applications
– Federal issues related to Shallotte Inlet maintenance;
– Review and work toward federal opportunities to assist with industry vessels needed;
– Work on easement issues to allow Town-owned property to be used for disposal of local dredging projects from federal perspective;
– Facilitation of discussions with FEMA regarding response time to Project Worksheets;
– Pursuit of quicker response from FEMA regarding final close-out payments

Previously reported – November 2018
Proposal / Ordinance 18-17
Approval is required in order to execute either of the proposals
Option 1 which reduces the level of proposed services (5) requires funding of $52,500
Option 2 the level of proposed services (10) requires funding of $66,500

For both options the amount to fund the retainer only provides funds through the end of the fiscal year.

Move funds of $66,500
From Revenue account #50.0399.0000 to Expense account#50.0710.0400

The Board in response to the presentation made by this firm requested them to bring back a proposal. Poyner Spruill submitted two proposals with a suite of services offered. Option 2 requires a retainer of $9,500 per month or a minimum of $114,000 annually. At this point we had what could be described as a spirited discussion.

Some of the major talking points were –
. 1)
What are our priorities?
. 2)
Have we utilized the other options available to us?
. 3)
Should we talk to other providers and get competitive bids?
. 4)
What are we comfortable spending?

In the end they asked the Town Manager to approach the firm and essentially ask them to redo their proposal. The BOC’s were able to agree to narrowing our priorities down to just two subject matters – Lockwood Folly Inlet and Beach Nourishment.

Request is to specifically ask them to clarify the scope of work, basic steps, deliverables, and the chances of success

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Agenda Packet – December
Scope of Engagement.
We have agreed to advise and assist you with governmental matters and legal issues that arise and the Client hereby engages Poyner Spruill LLP to perform the following services in accordance with the terms and conditions set forth in this Agreement: working with the Client to secure federal assistance and project management regarding: (1) federal issues related to beach nourishment at Holden Beach, North Carolina, and (2) federal issues related to Lockwood Folly Inlet maintenance.

Retainer
The retainer for our services will be $6,975.00 per month.

Holden Beach Renourishment Project, NC: Background, Status and Proposed Scope of Work

Status
    1)
Securing the funding to complete the General Reevaluation Report.
.     2)
Identifying an appropriate project plan.
    3)Obtaining sufficient borrow material available to construct and nourish the project for 50 years.
    4) Determining whether the amount of borrow material necessary to construct and nourish the project for 50 years can be obtained without significant environmental impacts.

Proposed Scope of Work
Step 1. Facilitate Discussions with the Corps of Engineers
Step 2. Develop a Detailed Strategy to Get the General Reevaluation Report Back on Track
Step 3. Initiate Implementation of the Strategy.
        • Steps 1-3 should be accomplished within the first six months of the contract.
Step 4. Ensure that the Project is Properly Scoped
Step 5. Work to Ensure that the General Reevaluation Report is Completed in a Timely Manner.
Step 6.  Help Pursue a Construction New Start.

Poyner Proposal Options –

Option A –
The level of proposed services (10) requires funding of $9,500 per month or a minimum of $114,000 annually.
Option B –
The level of proposed services (5) requires funding of $7,500 per month or a minimum of $90,000 annually.
Option C –
The level of proposed services (2) requires funding of $6,975 per month or a minimum of $83,700 annually.

Update –
Once again, they asked the Town Manager to approach the firm and essentially ask them to redo their proposal.
The BOC’s were able to agree to narrowing our priorities down to just one issue Beach Nourishment.

So, let me get this straight –
We go from ten (10) proposed services to just two (2) which is an 80% reduction
But the cost goes from $9,500 to $6,975 only a 27% reduction
But wait, it gets worse …
They reduce the service request to one issue without knowing what if any reduction in cost will be

Proposal / Ordinance 18-17
Approval is required in order to execute the proposal
Move funds of $41,850
From Revenue account #50.0399.0000 to Expense account#50.0710.0400

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

I’m confused… what just happened?
It’s not obvious to me, what exactly we are getting and how much it will cost us.

We just committed to hiring a prestigious law firm with little or no experience in beach nourishment issues.
Not to mention, we did not even bother to see what other firms can do and at what cost.
Do we know if this really is the best we can do?


13. Discussion and Possible Approval of Ordinance 18-18, An Ordinance Amending the Holden Beach Code of Ordnances, Chapter 30: Town Government and Officials (Section 30.26 Audit Committee of the BOC) – Commissioner Fletcher 

Agenda Packet –
TOWN OF HOLDEN BEACH ORDINANCE 18-18
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE HOLDEN BEACH CODE OF ORDINANCES, CHAPTER 30:
TOWN GOVERNMENT AND OFFICIALS (SECTION 30.26 AUDIT COMMITTEE OF THE BOC)

BE IT ORDAINED BY the Mayor and Board of Commissioners of the Town of Holden Beach, North Carolina that the Holden Beach Code of Ordinances, Chapter 30: Town Government and Officials (Section 30.26 Audit Committee of the BOC) be amended as follows:

Section One: Amend Section 30.26 Audit Committee of the BOC to read as follows:

§30.26 Audit Committee of the BOC
(A) There is hereby established an Audit Committee of the BOC, which shall be comprised of a Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee and not fewer than two, nor more than four Public members, as determined by the BOC at the first regular Board of Commissioners meeting in January

POWERS AND DUTIES
The Audit Committee shall:
. 1.
Serve as an advisory board for the Town’s Board of Commissioners;
. 2.
Assist and advise the BOC in its oversight responsibilities for the town’s financial reporting process, systems of internal financial controls and the external audit process;
. 3.
Recommend to the BOC the selection of the independent external audit firm to conduct the annual external audit;
. 4.
Evaluate the performance of the external audit firm as it relates to the annual audit of the Town of Holden Beach and its self-insurance policies;
. 5.
Review, advise and make recommendations to the BOC with respect to the town’s treasury management function and its’ risk management policies and procedures, including without limitation, the town’s insurance and self-insurance policies;
. 6.
Confirm the Town’s internal control systems are in place and implemented, including information technology security and control;
. 7.
Confirm Town management implements audit report recommendations;
. 8.
Continually evaluate the independence of the external auditors; to audit findings and forward findings to the Board of Commissioners;
. 9.
Review the Town’s CAFR, management letter and management’s response;
. 10.
Review and reassess the adequacy of this Charter at least every two years, with any revision submitted to the Board of Commissioners for approval;
. 11.
Provide an avenue of communication among the Board of Commissioners, Town Management and the external independent auditors;
. 12.
Perform other functions from time to time as shall be delegated or assigned to it by the

APPOINTMENT, TERMS
The Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee shall be elected by the BOC at the first regular meeting in January. The Public Members shall be appointed by the Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee, subject to confirmation by the BOC. The Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee, an elected Commissioner, and each of the Public Members shall have a normal term of one year and shall serve at the pleasure of the BOC.

MEETINGS
. 1.
The Audit Committee will meet at least four times each year (quarterly to assess the quarterly financial The Committee will also meet at least one additional time a year to review the final audit report from the external auditors. The Chair may call additional meetings as deemed necessary in fulfillment of the role of the Committee.
. 2.
The Audit Committee shall comply with the provisions of the North Carolina Open Meetings Law, § 143-318.9 et seq. A quorum shall be in attendance before any action of an official nature can be taken. A quorum shall exist when a majority of the Committee is in attendance.
. 3.
The Audit Committee may invite the manager, staff, auditors and others to attend the meetings and provide pertinent information, as

ATTENDANCE
All Committee members are expected to attend every meeting. Requests for excused absences due to sickness, death or emergencies of like nature shall be approved by the Committee as approved absences and shall not affect membership, except that in the event of a long illness, or other such cause for prolonged absence, the member may be replaced.

Agenda Packet – November
Audit Committee Charter and By Laws
§30.26 Audit Committee of the BOC

Previously reported – July 2018
Commissioner Fletcher felt there was a gap between the Board’s intention and what has actually come to pass based on the Town’s staff interpretation. John as Chair of the Audit Committee requested that the Board clarify what functions they wanted the Audit Committee to perform. The Board advised him that the Audit Committee must adopt their bylaws and then bring it back to the Board for discussion and approval.

Previously reported – August 2018
Commissioner Fletcher submitted the bylaws that the Audit Committee unanimously approved. Noel Fox the Town Attorney took issue with several items. They will have to submit an amended / revised version for approval again. Who knew this could be so complicated? The Board did manage to authorize the Audit Committee to schedule a meeting with the firm conducting the internal control review. The Board does not want to wait for a final report and requested an interim status update as soon as it can be made available.

Previously reported – October 2018
This was on the agenda in July, August and September. They anticipate having document that has been approved by the Town Attorney and the Audit Committee for the BOC’s Regular Meeting in November.

Previously reported –November 2018
Well this did not go well. Once again, it was not approved as submitted. Mike and Pat took umbrage to some verbiage. The Town attorney said that the document submitted tonight is not what she recommended and submitted to the Audit Committee. In December of 2015 Resolution 15.17 established the Audit Committee. Three years later we still do not have bylaws or charter. Seriously how tough is this to get right? It was sent back to the Audit Committee one more time.

Update –
Yet again, it was not approved as submitted. Mike and Pat took umbrage to the verbiage “The Public Members shall be appointed by the Chairman of the BOC Audit Committee”. They would prefer that the BOC’s selected the members of the Audit Committee the same way they select the members of all the other committees, but they were agreeable to the Audit Committee establishing specific requirements with a job description that indicated the preferred qualifications for the candidates. After considerable discussion they finally agreed to basically change just one word appointed to recommended. It now reads, “The Chairman shall make a recommendation to the BOC’s who shall serve”.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


14. Discussion and Possible Action on Amending the Rules of Procedure
. a)
Part VI. Agenda, Rule 13. Agenda, Section A & Part X. Public Hearings and Comment Periods, Rule 36, Public Hearings and Comment Periods, Section 2, Public Comment Periods– Commissioner Butler
. b)
Part VI. Agenda, Rule 13. Agenda, Section B – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Agenda Packet –
Commissioner Butler
Part VI. Rule 13, Section A
I am recommending that the second sentence contained in Rule number 13, Agenda, on page 5 of the Suggested Rules of Procedure for the Town of Holden Beach Board be revised. To be consistent at both Regular and Special Meetings I would like for the current wording in that sentence be standardized for both Regular and Special Meetings to encourage public participation to provide comments on Agenda Items. This recommendation can also be added to page 16, (2) Public Comment Periods, providing the public an opportunity to comment on an agenda item at both Regular and Special Meetings.

Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Part VI. Rule 13, Section B
Proposal to Amend the Suggested Rules of Procedure for the THB Adopted in Resolution 18-07
Remove the word significant from the last sentence ” Items that are added to the agenda at a meeting in combination with significant supporting documentation will be designated “For Discussion”, with action deferred to a later session.” This adds clarity to the intent that new agenda items proposed at a meeting that involve handouts (or the reading of written statements/supporting documents) to propose a BOC decision, for example, to adopt or amend resolutions, policies, procedures, ordinances, etc., can be accepted only for discussion at the current session. This ensures maximum transparency in that the public has a chance to read and make fully informed comment on the proposed action. The above does not apply in cases where an immediate budget amendment may be necessary and due to timing, the background documentation was not available prior to the meeting.

Previously reported – November 2018
Agenda Approval
Commissioner Butler made a motion to add an agenda item as follows:
Discussion and Possible Action –
Amend Resolution 18-07 Rule 13 to Allow Public Comments at Special Meetings

Mayor Pro Tem Mike Sullivan and Commissioner Patricia Kwiatkowski both objected
Although both are in favor of making the change, they oppose the way it was introduced

They have been consistent in their position as follows:
. 1)
Process needs to be followed
. 2)
Items need to be submitted prior to the meeting
. 3) Material
should be provided prior to meeting so they can review and understand it
. 4)
Information should be included in Agenda Packet
. 5) The p
ublic should also see material prior to meeting
Update –
Part VI. Rule 13, Section A
The proposed agenda allows preparation by commissioners, staff and encourages public participation.
Despite that all five Commissioners previously indicated that they wanted the change we spent an inordinate amount of time discussing whether it was necessary or not.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously

Part VI. Rule 13, Section A
Items that are added to the agenda at a meeting in combination with significant supporting documentation …

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


15. Discussion and Possible Action Related to Large/ Party Houses on Holden Beach – Mayor Pro Tem Sullivan

Agenda Packet –
I would like to have the Planning and Zoning Board revisit the issue, by investigating and reporting to the Board of Commissioners on the feasibility and applicability of the measures proposed by Dare County, as follows:
. 1)
At last week’s Duck Town Council meeting, members considered a recommendation by the Duck Planning Board to regulate occupancy by establishing town standards for the capacity of septic systems based on lot sizes.
. 2) They also scheduled for Dec. 5 a public hearing on a draft ordinance that would set a tiered approach to regulating house size based on lot size.

Dare Towns Look to Manage ‘Mega-Houses’
As Dare County municipalities try to address concerns about the proliferation of “mega-houses” and their impact on the character and environment of beach communities, the town councils in both Southern Shores and Duck met last week to explore new approaches to the issue.
Read more » click here

Update –
Planning & Inspections Director Evans poured some cold water on the discussion, by reminding them that you cannot legally regulate the number of bedrooms. That said, they would like to investigate if it is feasible to obtain the same outcome but approach it from a different way.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


16. Discussion and Possible Scheduling of a Date for Setting 2019 BOC Objectives with Town Management – Commissioner Kwiatkowski

Agenda Packet –
Commissioner Kwiatkowski
As we start the year, there would be benefit from a Board of Commissioners and Town Manager meeting to set agreed major 2019 objectives before we begin the budget process. The BOCM should schedule a January date for such a meeting.

Update –
By consensus they agreed to schedule a January workshop

In 2017 we started the budget process in January. The request was made to move everything up and start the process earlier. However, the Budget schedule last year wasn’t moved up in any meaningful way. The Board is still not really working on the budget until the eleventh hour. I am disappointed that we have not even established the budget meeting schedule yet.

Budget Season 2017 / Meeting Schedule
.     1)
23 Jan                BOC’s Workshop Goals / Capital Programs
.     2)
24 Feb               Canal Dredging Working Group
.     3)
3 Mar                 Departments Input to Manager
.     4)
15 Mar               BOC’s Workshop Revenues
.     5)
24 Apr               BOC’s Workshop Expenses
    6)
15 May              Budget Message
.     7)
9 June                Special Meeting / Public Hearing
.     8)
20 June              Regular BOC’s Meeting
    9)
30 June              Budget Adopted

Local governments must balance their budget by a combination of the following:
    1)
Raising taxes
.     2)
Cutting spending
    3)
Operating more efficiently

The Town Manager’s proposed budget is due by June 1st
Commissioners must adopt budget no later than June 30th for the next fiscal year
Adopting the annual budget is a primary responsibility of the Board.

This is what I’d like to see the budget process look like starting in January –
Monthly Meetings / Workshops
Board Goals
Review Capital Improvement Plan
Staff presentations – wants / needs / revenue streams / cost cutting measures
Review Towns current level of services provided – change /add / delete
Review staffing and compensation package
Line by line review of the budget
Appropriate funds for the following:

  • Beach Nourishment
  • Dredging
  • Infrastructure Reserves – Water System / Sewer System / Roads & Sidewalks

17. Discussion and Possible Action on Lockwood Folly Dredging Issues – Vicki Myers, Chair Inlet & Beach Protection Board

Agenda Packet –
NCDWR Grant for Wider and Deeper Project
The Inlet and Beach Protection Board (IBPB) met December 7th for a Special Meeting to discuss the County’s request for a response regarding the North Carolina Department of Water Resources (NCDWR) grant they received for dredging the outer bar of the Lockwood Folly Inlet, commonly referred to as the Wider and Deeper Project.

Our consulting engineer has expressed concerns about the potential impacts this project could have on our East End and the beach strand as a whole, especially if the project is executed and the resultant sand is not placed on Holden Beach.

The BOC’s Resolution 18-10 states that before a decision is made on the Wider and Deeper project that a “data driven cost benefit analysis that included possible environmental impacts” be completed. It also notes that “no historical monitoring or state of the art modeling data has been produced”.

The ordinance which established the IBPB directed the Board to make recommendations on the feasibility, cost and benefits of projects. The IBPB discussed the issues related to the NCDWR grant and offers the following comments:

Feasibility:

  • Permitting for this project raises many questions. It is unclear if this will require a major or minor modification to the Town’s SDl-5 There are also obstacles in permitting such as documented historical wrecks and potential environmental concerns.
  • The project is estimated as a piggy-back It is unclear if an ocean-going dredge will be available. Without availability, the cost would increase dramatically.

Cost:

  • The estimated cost to the Town would be $13/cy, which is a good price – if that figure ends up as the final price. The figure would change if a piggy-back option were not available.
  • A funding source for the project was di The Board recommends that the BOC and Town Management determine where the funds should come from, recognizing that there is an existing funding structure in the Town’s budget.

Concerns:

  • Our Consulting Engineer has expressed concerns about the potential negative impacts to our beach if we do not receive the sand from this As the down-drift beach, we would feel the impact more than neighboring beaches.
  • The grant estimates that 250,000cy of material would be This amount has never been taken from the Lockwood Folly Inlet.
  • If there are negative impacts to our beach, or neighboring beaches, who would be responsible?
  • The email from the County states that if the project is deemed a success, in the future projects would alternate sand placement between Holden Beach and the neighboring beach. How is success determined and what defines it? Is success defined in terms of navigation or erosion?
  • Holden Beach’s East End has continual, chronic erosion As the down-drift beach we do not support a sharing arrangement. This is consistent with Ocean Isle Beach receiving dredge material from the Shallotte Inlet.
  • It is unclear who is responsible for this project in the While the Corps has traditionally been responsible for the inlet, NCDWR requires that the entity receiving the grant, in this case the County, take responsibility for the long-term maintenance of the project. The County agreed to this in their resolution when applying for the grant.

Recommendations:

  • The IBPB recommends that the Town pursue this opportunity and that the sand be placed on the East End of Holden Beach, as indicated in the grant applicati We feel this is especially important as the Town is missing out on this cycle of the Lockwood Folly Crossing sand.
  • We recommend that Town Staff follow up with the County regarding comments in the email about the project being determined to be a
  • Participation in the Wider-Deeper Project should not be construed as supporting the sharing of sand from the outer bar with neighboring
  • We recommend that the proposed cost sharing arrangement be di The burden share of 75% recipient beach/25% County has increased from past projects. The cost of permits and easements are included in the grant, but the Town has already expended funds to obtain these.

In summary, the IBPB unanimously feels that if this project goes forward it is essential that the sand come to Holden Beach. As the down-drift beach, we cannot afford for the dredging to occur without sand placement on our beach.


IBPB Special Meeting / December 7, 2018

Public Comments

  • Added Public Comments to agenda, not the norm for Special Meetings
  • Special Meeting
    • Regular Meetings are looser, allow for more interaction/participation with Public
    • Since this is a Special Meeting would like to hold comments until end of meeting

LFI Dredging Issues:  Wider and Deeper

Memo from Steve Stone, Deputy County Manager

  • Grant was approved – application submitted last July with stipulation that a letter of support for Oak Island’s sand permit be sent
  • Funds from State’s Shallow Draft Inlet Fund
  • ~250,000cy from outer bar, widening and deepening the channel
  • 02(c) of the IBPB ordinance addresses making recommendations on feasibility, Cost/benefit within Town as a whole
  • We need to send our comments to the BOC for them to act at their December Meeting, Mr. Stone wants to hear back by Beginning of January

Resolution 18-10

  • In Town’s Resolution, sent to everyone, we asked that before a decision is made “data driven cost benefit analysis that includes possible environmental impacts”
  • Also, “no historical monitoring or state of the art modeling data has been produced to demonstrate the benefits of such a project outweigh the risk of adverse effects”
  • NOTE: Original version did not have this.
  • We are an advisory board, and this is what the BOC said, so we are obligated to put it in

Impacts to HB

  • Consulting Engineer Fran Way has major concerns about the project, especially if sand is placed on Oak Island

Permitting Concerns

  • Is this truly a minor permit modification? Doug Huggett CAMA – major
  • 408 review?
  • Core samples?
  • Turbidity
  • Will an EA be required?
  • Fran:
    • Bottom Line – may not happen, or not by 2019
    • Wrecks
    • Modeling shows changes to river salinity
  • Is this EFH Essential Fish Habitat area? Was Larval Transport study complete?
  • What permits are required, who has them, and will Oak be able to get them?

Costs

  • Permitting costs are wrapped into the grant, if sand comes to Holden and we are using our permits (which we have already paid to obtain) then the cost share should be reduced.
  • State Funding 2/3 – 2,754,650 Local funding 1/3 – 1,377,350
  • County proposed 75/25 split. They would pay $344,338 and one of the Towns would pay $1,033,013.
  • Sand would cost $4.13cy We paid $0.63/yd for LFIX in 2017 for120,000cy. We paid $8/cy in 2014 for 93,000cy? (numbers not clear on this one)

My thoughts

  • All sand from LFI should be placed on HB as the down drift beach, just as Ocean Isle gets the Shallotte Inlet
  • We need to back up our comments from earlier this year and clearly and unequivocally insist the sand should come here
  • Sharing arrangement is not acceptable

Outstanding Questions

  • Memo from Stone
    • Define “successful”
    • Wider/Deeper should never go to Oak because of the impact on HB
  • What is the “safe” amount that can be taken from the inlet without causing problems to the inlet or beaches – sediment budget?
  • We have never taken this sand before – max was 140,000cy in 2010 with the LFIX
  • If sand is given to Oak can we protest that the grant application included project design documents only showing HB placement?
  • What is the implication in the County’s resolution that they will be responsible for long term maintenance of the project? Are they taking over the outer bar channel from now on?  No more Murden or Merritt?

Other Issues

  • Need to schedule an agenda meeting with David/Christy/Mike
    • Discuss ways to get IBPB members on Boards/Committees/Commissions
    • Quarterly MOA meeting?

BRUNSWICK COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS OFFICIAL MINUTES
REGULAR MEETING JULY 16, 2018

NCDWR Grant Resolution (Steve Stone, Deputy County Manager) Request that the Board of Commissioners consider approving a resolution of application to the NC Division of Water resources for a grant to dredge an improved navigation channel at the Lockwood Folly Inlet.

Mr. Stone explained that the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) only had enough funding and/or equipment over the last several decades to dredge the navigation channel to a depth of about 8 feet. However, the channel is authorized to a depth of 12 feet. This project would propose that the County engage a private party, presumably a party that is under contract with the USACE to do other work, for a $4 million project that would dredge the channel to 14 feet deep and a full 150 feet wide. The State will pay two-thirds of the cost of this project, including soft costs such as engineering and administrative costs.   It is recommended that the Board consider paying one quarter of the local share, and whichever beach community receives the sand pay the other three quarters of the local share. While this is a navigation project, approximately 200,000to 300,000 cubic yards of suitable sand would be produced to be placed on a beach on either side of the channel. All the permits are not in place; however, the project would work toward that permitting.  The sand is worth $2 to $3 million. There is no obligation to accept the grant if it is awarded.  If it is awarded and the County goes through permitting and engineering activities, and the project does not occur, those activities would still be eligible for the State funding and could be used for future potential projects.

RESOLUTION TO SPONSOR –
THE LOCKWOOD FOLLY INLET OCEAN BAR NAVIGATION MAINTENANCE PROJECT

WHEREAS, the Brunswick County Board of Commissioners (Board) desires to sponsor the Lockwood Folly Inlet Ocean Bar Navigation Maintenance Project, which will provide an improved and more durable navigation channel at the Lockwood Folly Inlet.

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED THAT:

1)     The Brunswick County Board of Commissioners requests the State of North Carolina to provide financial assistance to Brunswick County for the Lockwood Folly Inlet Ocean Bar Navigation Maintenance project in the amount of $2,750,000.00 or 67 percent of project construction cost, whichever is the lesser amount;

2)     The Board assumes full obligation for payment of the balance of project costs;

3)     The Board will obtain all necessary State and Federal permits;

4)     The Board will comply with all applicable laws governing the award of contracts and the expenditure of public funds by local governments.

5)     The Board will supervise construction of the project to assure compliance with permit conditions and to assure safe and proper construction according to approved plans and specifications;

6)     The Board will obtain suitable spoil disposal areas as needed and all other easements orrights-of-waythatmaybenecessaryfortheconstructionandoperationoftheproject without cost or obligation to the State;

7)     The Board will assure that the project is open for use by the public on an equal basis with no restrictions;

8)     The Board will hold the State harmless from any damages that may result from the construction, operation and maintenance of the project;

9)     The Board accepts responsibility for the operation and maintenance of the completed project.

Adopted by the Brunswick County Board of Commissioners this 16th day of July 2018.


18. Discussion and Possible Approval of Board of Commissioners’ 2019 Meeting Schedule – Town Clerk Finnell

 Regular Meetings are held on the third Tuesday of each month

TUESDAY, JANUARY 15th
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19th
TUESDAY, MARCH 19th
TUESDAY, APRIL 16th
TUESDAY, MAY 21st
TUESDAY, JUNE 18th
TUESDAY, JULY 16th
TUESDAY, AUGUST 20st
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17th
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15th
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19th
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17th 

Meeting schedule was adopted with no changes.

A decision was made – Approved unanimously


19. Town Manager’s Report

Personnel Announcements
Chief Layne has officially announced his retirement effective 1 April 2019
Detective Dixon is formally designated “Chief in Waiting”
Officer Colten Robinson has joined the Police Department and is in field training program

Administrative Assistant Inspections Department Ava Cain announced her retirement effective 1 January 2019
Former Beach Ranger Maddie Zehneler is filling the position on a temporary basis

Former Beach Ranger Megan Hegador is now a regular full-time Administrative Assistant at the reception desk

Rollout Service
Waste Industries offers rollout service, by request basis, to infirm resident homeowners

Canal Dredging Project
Previously reported – December 2017
Adoption Resolution 17-10, Water Resources Development Grant ($1,439,922)
The grant is good for two years and will accelerate our current dredging schedule. Each canal will be responsible for paying for their dredging project costs upfront. It is a reimbursement grant which means we do not receive the funds from the state until after satisfactory completion of the project.

Previously reported – June 2018
The Town is planning to perform a complete dredge of all of the canals this coming fall/winter (November 2018 – Mar 2019). We have been apprised of recent changes regarding the obtainment of consent agreements for USACE dredge spoil areas. Those changes will result in closer scrutiny of remaining capacity in existing sites; hence longer/unknown lead times and quite possibly denial of permission to place material from this fall’s canal maintenance dredging in the Corps disposal sites. The Town has been preparing the area adjacent to the dog park as an alternate site if unable to use the USACE dredge spoil areas. David reminded us that this is a big undertaking with lots of moving parts and will require considerable time and effort from the Town staff to pull it off without a hitch.

Water Bill
The Town is planning to perform a complete dredge of all of the canals this coming fall/winter (November 2018 – Mar 2019). It is recommended that property owners begin getting ready for the canal dredging as early as possible by first assessing the condition of their bulkheads so that repairs on those structures can be made in plenty of time before dredging begins. This will not only provide for the best dredging effort, but also lesson the possibility of leaky bulkheads filling canals back in prematurely after dredge completion. The Town will also be conducting its annual inspection of the bulkheads. Likewise, it is also recommended that property owners begin to coordinate the actions needed to move your floating docks in anticipation of the actual dredge arrival in order to facilitate a better excavation near their pilings. Finally, boat movements should also be considered. You may want to begin planning for winter accommodations and repairs to your boat now. Remember that boat dry docks book up fast.

Previously reported – August 2018
Town had meeting with potential bidders for the canal dredging project
He anticipates bid letting date sometime in September
Dredging is scheduled to start in the middle of November

The Town has been preparing the area adjacent to the dog park off Scotch Bonnet.
It will be necessary to close the dog park this winter once dredging project begins.
The dog park will probably have to be closed until Memorial Day in 2019.

Previously reported – October 2018
Construction at the Scotch Bonnet dredge spoil area began this week in preparation for this winter’s canal dredging project. We ask that canal property owners begin to move their boats and docks if possible in preparation for the dredge event. The tentative schedule will begin with Holden Beach Harbor mid-November, followed by Heritage Harbor mid-January, and Harbor Acres mid-February.

Previously reported – November 2018
King Dredging is fully mobilized on site with dredge in canals. Scotch Bonnet dredge spoil area work is just about completed. Dredging operations are scheduled to commence the first day of December working the canals from east to west. Property owners should have made dock and boat arrangements already, but if you haven’t there’s still a little time left.

King Dredging is just about ready to begin with the following tentative schedule:
. 1)
Holden Beach Harbor – December 1st through January 25th
. 2) Heritage Harbor – January 26th through February 25th
. 3) Harbor Acres – Feb 26th through April 9th

Update –
Canal Dredging operations are underway but is running about two weeks behind projected schedule.
The dredge “Patricia Sanderson” started work in the Holden Beach Harbor feeder canal. 

No Name Storm
Thanksgiving weekend flooding caused numerous sewer system operations issues. Circumstances were very similar to a hurricane event with one major difference, the island was populated, and the sewers system was operational. Operations could not have been maintained if the flooding was more widespread.

Storm Events
Three FEMA hurricane damage reimbursement programs being worked simultaneously
. 1)
Matthew $350,000 reimbursement still outstanding
. 2)
Florence @$8,000,000 submitted everything we could
.
Federal Beach Technical Advisor has information necessary to complete required Cat G Project Worksheet.
. 3)
Michael submitted our estimated losses
. • W
ithout federal declaration this might not happen
.
Governor Cooper has requested federal declaration
.
Federal Beach Technical Advisor will write submittal
.
Additional surveying of beach strand losses underway to meet federal guidelines


General Comments –

There were fourteen (14) members of the community in attendance

Meeting Agenda
Yet another marathon session, the meeting ran for over three (3) hours

The BOC’s January Regular Meeting has been rescheduled to the third Tuesday of the month, January 15th

Fiscal Year 2017 – 2018 Audit Results
Auditor’s report is due by October 31st
and is normally is given at the October meeting. Report was not given at the October meeting and it wasn’t scheduled at the November or December meetings. Town Manager reported at the October meeting that the two storm events have delayed the annual audit process. The field work by the external auditor won’t be completed till mid-November. The auditor Rives & Associates has advised the Local Government Commission.

Town Manager’s Review
The Town Managers performance review was supposed to be done on the anniversary date of his hire which is in February. Once again it was not done in a timely manner.

I respectfully submit my Xmas list

These are the items I would most like to see addressed this year.
.1)
Beach – Strand / Inlet / Groin
.   a)
Select an East End nourishment project strategy
.   b)
Support Lockwood Folly Inlet waterway maintenance projects, keeping inlet navigable
  c)
Work together on beach protection issues with surrounding communities
  d)
Increase Beach Strand Ordinance Compliance & Enforcement
  e)
Expand Beach Ranger Program by having it cover shoulder tourist season too
.2) Parking
  a)
Develop plans for a promenade on Jordan Boulevard
.   b)
Utilize acquired properties for additional parking
.   c)
Prohibit right-of-way parking
.3) Trash Services
  a)
Offer a suite of services to all properties with a user fee charged for those that want the service
.   b)
Make policies both fair and consistent
.4) Community Rating System – improve rating so flood insurance rates are discounted


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The views expressed here are simply my opinion based on the facts as I understand them. I have no hidden agenda, no ax to grind, or any political ambition. I’m simply attempting to keep the community informed on what actually is going on here. I welcome updates, clarifications or a correction to any fact I have stated which have changed or was inadvertently stated incorrectly.

Disclaimer –
. 1) Not official correspondence from the Town
. 2) Not affiliated with Holden Beach Property Owners Association


Wishing you and yours a Happy Holiday!Poinsetta


Hurricane Season –

Hurricane #1 - CR

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) defines a hurricane as “an intense tropical weather system with a well-defined circulation and maximum sustained winds of 74 mph (64 knots) or higher.”

Be prepared – have a plan!

For assistance with making an emergency plan read more here »
. 1) FEMA Ready
. 2) American Red Cross Disaster and Safety Library
. 3) ReadyNC
. 4) Town Emergency Information
. 5) HBPOIN Hurricane Emergency Plan

THB – EVACUATION, CURFEW & VEHICLE DECALS
For more information » click here

If the Town declares a mandatory evacuation, PLEASE LEAVE
General Assembly during the 2012 Session, specifically authorizes both voluntary and mandatory evacuations, and increases the penalty for violating any local emergency restriction or prohibition from a Class 3 to a Class 2 misdemeanor. Given the broad authority granted to the governor and city and county officials under the North Carolina Emergency Management Act (G.S. Chapter 166A) to take measures necessary to protect public health, safety, and welfare during a disaster, it is reasonable to interpret the authority to “direct and compel” evacuations to mean ordering “mandatory” evacuations. Those who choose to not comply with official warnings to get out of harm’s way, or are unable to, should prepare themselves to be fully self-sufficient for the first 72 hours after the storm.

No matter what a storm outlook is for a given year,

vigilance and preparedness is urged.


BEACH & INLET NEWSLETTER
This storm season proved to be active for the Town of Holden Beach. We were visited by both Hurricane Florence and Michael, as well as additional recent astrological tide events that produced flooding. The Town lost approximately 257,707 cubic yards of sand in Hurricane Florence in September, with 201,564 cubic yards occurring in the engineered beach area. Post Michael storm analysis shows that we lost approximately 136,087 cubic yards along the shoreline with 90,927 cubic yards occurring in the engineered beach area. Although the beach took a hit with estimated damages for the beach strand currently totaling $7,797,917 for Florence and $5,623,046 for Michael, the Central Reach Project proved invaluable as a storm damage reduction project. It was instrumental in the protection of the dune system and homes along the beachfront. We are working with FEMA on a weekly basis to finalize damage reports in order to qualify for federal and state funding of repairs to the beach strand. As an engineered beach, approval of project damage assessments by FEMA should result in reimbursements of storm damage repairs.

FEMA provides Hurricane Florence data update for Brunswick County
Brunswick County residents have received more than $42.4 million in state and federal funds since the federal disaster declaration for Hurricane Florence, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Nearly $6.7 million in state and federal grants have gone to nearly 1,800 homeowners and renters. More than 1,000 flood insurance claims have been filed. An estimated $18 million in claims have been paid to date. As of Nov. 16, nearly $17.7 million in U.S. Small Business Administration low-interest disaster loans have been approved for 438 homeowners and 41 businesses. As of Nov. 19, 6,738 home inspections have been issued. Nearly 100 percent of home inspections have been completed. Transitional Sheltering Assistance is an option using participating hotel/motels to help survivors identify short or long-term housing solutions. The current number of households checked in is 16. Brunswick County has been approved for FEMA Direct Temporary Housing Assistance. Travel trailers and manufactured housing units may be provided for eligible applicants. The Disaster Recovery Center for Brunswick County is located at the Virginia Williams Event Center, Odell Williams Auditorium, at 150 College Road NE in Bolivia and is open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday. It opened Sept. 29 and has assisted 1,646 visitors. Disaster Survivor Assistance (DSA) has had more than 7,700 interactions with survivors. As of Nov. 19, there are two DSA crews working in Brunswick County.
Read more » click here

Headlined by Florence and Michael, a second straight destructive Atlantic hurricane season wraps up
Hurricane season officially ended Friday, and, for a second straight year, generated costly and deadly storms that ravaged the U.S. coast.  While not as active as “the hurricane season from hell” the year before, the 2018 season spawned two terrible storms in Hurricanes Florence and Michael, which will be long remembered for their devastating toll in the Carolinas and the Florida Panhandle. Counting Harvey, Irma and Maria in 2017, Michael in 2018, and Typhoon Yutu last month, which smashed into the Northern Marianas (a U.S. territory), five Category 4 or stronger tropical cyclones have struck U.S. soil in the last two years, which is possibly unprecedented. 2018 marked an active Atlantic hurricane season for the third time in a row. By definition, the season begins June 1 and ends Nov. 30. This season began and ended early. Alberto, the first storm, formed in May, while Oscar, the last, came in October. In all, 15 named storms formed, and of those, eight became hurricanes, and of those, two became major hurricanes (defined as Category 3+ on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale). The average numbers during a season are 12.1 named storms, 6.4 hurricanes, and 2.7 major hurricanes.
Read more » click here

Destructive 2018 Atlantic hurricane season draws to an end
NOAA services before, during, after storms saved lives and aided recovery
The 2018 Atlantic hurricane season officially concludes on November 30, and will be remembered most for hurricanes Florence and Michael, which caused significant damage in the southeastern U.S. In total, the season produced 15 named storms, including eight hurricanes of which two were “major” (Category 3, 4 or 5). An average season has 12 named storms, six hurricanes, and three major hurricanes.

For the fourth consecutive year, hurricane activity began prior to the official June 1st start of the season, with Tropical Storm Alberto forming on May 25. Alberto made landfall in northern Florida and traveled as far north as the Great Lakes as a tropical depression. A record seven named storms (Alberto, Beryl, Debby, Ernesto, Joyce, Leslie and Oscar) were classified as subtropical at some point. The previous record of five subtropical storms occurred in 1969. A subtropical storm is a named storm that has tropical and non-tropical characteristics. All subtropical storms this season eventually transitioned into a tropical storm, with three (Beryl, Leslie and Oscar) eventually becoming hurricanes.

The 2018 hurricane season was the first since 2008 to have four named storms active at the same time (Florence, Helene, Isaac and Joyce). Hurricane Florence caused catastrophic flooding in portions of North and South Carolina. Several river forecast locations in the Carolinas approached or broke their record flood level in the days and weeks following the hurricane. It took two to three weeks for many river locations to fall below flood stage, and the final river crested one month after Florence made landfall. Hurricane Michael, at a Category 4 intensity, was the strongest hurricane on record to strike the Florida panhandle. It was the third-most-intense hurricane to make landfall in the continental U.S. on record in terms of central pressure (919 mb) and the fourth-strongest in terms of maximum sustained winds (155 mph).

“The 2018 season fell within NOAA’s predicted ranges in our pre-season outlook issued in late May. However, the overall season was more active than predicted in the updated outlook issued in early August,” said Gerry Bell, Ph.D., lead seasonal hurricane forecaster at NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center. “Warmer Atlantic Ocean temperatures, a stronger west-African monsoon and the fact that El Nino did not form in time to suppress the season helped to enhance storm development.”   

With lessons learned from the 2018 hurricane season still fresh in memory, now is the time to make note of ways to improve family hurricane plans for next year. The 2019 hurricane season will officially begin on June 1 and NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center will provide its initial seasonal outlook in May.
Read more » click here

Hurricane Florence
After Action Report – not given

Hurricane Michael
After Action Report – not given

In the past the Town did a self-assessment of its emergency actions and responses before, during and after the storm event. Public input was considered a valued component of efforts to evaluate the Towns performance and they asked us: How did we do? Apparently, that is no longer the case.


HBPOIN – Lou’s Views
. • Gather and disseminate information
. • Identify the issues and determine how they affect you

. • Act as a watchdog
. • Grass roots monthly newsletter since 2008


https://lousviews.com/

12 – News & Views

Lou’s Views
News & Views / December Edition

Calendar of Events –

Run Holden Beach – 2019
The fifth annual “Run Holden Beach” event is scheduled on Saturday, January 19th. Coastal Race Productions is planning a 1 mile “turtle trot”, 5k walk / run and a half marathon with all of these races starting and finishing under the bridge. This will all be followed by live music, games and an after party at the Holden Beach Pavilion.
For more information » click here
Register » click here

 


Las Vegas Night
The Rotary Club of Shallotte will host its Fourteenth Annual Las Vegas Night
on Saturday, January 26th
at 349 Whiteville Road, the Planet Fun building in Shallotte.


TDA - logoDiscover a wide range of things to do in the Brunswick Islands for an experience that goes beyond the beach.
For more information » click here


Calendar of Events Island –

Parks & Recreation / Programs & Events
For more information » click here


Reminders –


Trash Collection
There will be no trash pick-up on Christmas day, instead Waste Industries will collect trash on Saturday, December 29th. 

 


Yard Waste Service
Yard debris pick-up is provided twice a month on the 2nd and 4th Fridays during the months of October, November and December. There will not be a second yard debris pick-up this month. The last collection for this year will take place on Friday, December 14th

 


Dog Park Closed
The Dog Park is closed due to the canal dredging project. As it stands now, the USACE will not allow the Town to place material from the canal dredging in their spoil area. Pending CAMA approval, the Town plans on using land at the dog park as its spoils area. The dog park will remain closed until after the dredging project is complete. They anticipate the park will be closed until at least Memorial Day.

 


BOC’s Meeting
The Board of Commissioners’ January Regular Meeting is scheduled on the third Tuesday of the month, January 15th

 



News from Town of Holden Beach

The town sends out emails of events, news, agendas, notifications and emergency information. If you would like to be added to their mailing list, please go to their web site to complete your subscription to the Holden Beach E-Newsletter.
For more information » click here


Canal Dredging
The Town is planning to perform a complete dredge of all of the canals this coming fall/winter (November 2018 – Mar 2019). It is recommended that property owners begin getting ready for the canal dredging as early as possible by first assessing the condition of their bulkheads so that repairs on those structures can be made in plenty of time before dredging begins. This will not only provide for the best dredging effort, but also lesson the possibility of leaky bulkheads filling canals back in prematurely after dredge completion. The Town will also be conducting its annual inspection of the bulkheads. Likewise, it is also recommended that property owners begin to coordinate the actions needed to move your floating docks in anticipation of the actual dredge arrival in order to facilitate a better excavation near their pilings. Finally, boat movements should also be considered. You may want to begin planning for winter accommodations and repairs to your boat now. Remember that boat dry docks book up fast.

Dredging Project – October
Construction at the Scotch Bonnet dredge spoil area began this week in preparation for this winter’s canal dredging project. We ask that canal property owners begin to move their boats and docks if possible in preparation for the dredge event. The tentative schedule will begin with Holden Beach Harbor mid-November, followed by Heritage Harbor mid-January, and Harbor Acres mid-February.

Note: This schedule may be affected by inclement weather.

King Dredging is partially mobilized on site and is prepping containment area by dog park. Dredging scheduled to commence in the middle of November working the canals from east to west.

Dredging ProjectNovember
King Dredging is fully mobilized on site with dredge in canals. Scotch Bonnet dredge spoil area work is just about completed. Dredging operations are scheduled to commence the first day of December working the canals from east to west. Work is starting with Holden Beach Harbor, which includes canals between High Point and Greensboro. Property owners should have made dock and boat arrangements already, but if you haven’t there’s still a little time left.

King Dredging is just about ready to begin with the following tentative schedule:
. 1)
Holden Beach Harbor – December 1st through January 25th
. 2) Heritage Harbor – January 26th through February 25th
. 3) Harbor Acres – Feb 26th through April 9th

Dredging ProjectDecember

Canal Dredging Underway
Canal Dredging operations have begun. The dredge “Patricia Sanderson” started work in the Holden Beach Harbor feeder canal late last week. Currently, the dredge is working near the northern end of Durham Street heading west in the feeder canal. If you haven’t taken care of making arrangements to move your in water boats you need to do so as soon as possible.


Volunteers needed
The Town is always looking for people to volunteer for their various boards and committees. If you are interested in serving, please fill out a resume form and submit it to heather@hbtownhall.com.


Recycling-BinCurbside Recycling
Waste Industries is now offering curbside recycling for Town properties that desire to participate in the service. The service cost is $67.56 annually paid in advance to the Town of Holden Beach and consists of a ninety-six (96) gallon cart that is emptied every other week.
Curbside Recycling Application » click here
Curbside Recycling Calendar » click here

The recycling fee will be $82.48 per bin beginning on January 1, 2019

 

Town E-mail
Dear Holden Beach Resident,
Please find the attached renewal form for the recycling bin located at your Holden Beach property. If you would like to continue the recycling service for the 2019 year, please fill out the form and send it back with the $82.48 annual fee no later than January 15, 2019. Any payments not received by this date will result in the cancellation of the service and the removal of the recycling bin. If you have any questions please contact me @ reception@hbtownhall.com or call Town Hall at (910)842-6488. Please note that the recycling schedule for 2019 has changed. Pick up will remain once every two weeks for the months of January through May and October through December. Pick up will be weekly for the months of June through September.


Elevator - CRElevators
Most states mandate that elevator systems be tested and inspected annually. Currently the state of North Carolina does not require annual inspections to be performed on all elevator systems. The use of unsafe and defective lifting devices imposes a substantial probability of serious and preventable injury to your family and guests. It is in the owner’s best interest to minimize injuries and liability by scheduling an annual safety inspection to ensure the safe operation of their elevator system.


Safety Notice –

Waupaca Elevator Company has issued an important safety notice. The potential hazard is associated with normal wear in your elevator. If your elevator develops the problem and it is not repaired, the elevator may drop unexpectedly with you in it and you may be injured. They recommend you contact your elevator service company.


Library
If you need something to keep you busy in this colder weather, make sure to visit the island library. The library is in the upstairs of Holden Beach Town Hall. All the books were donated. Patrons of the library don’t have to check out a book; they are on the honor system to return it.

 


Neighborhood Watch –
Need to look out for each other
Call 911 if you see or hear anything suspicious
Fill out Keep Check Request Form if you will be out of town
• Submit completed Property Registration Form
• Pickup copy of Protecting Your Home


Upon Further Review –Seismic Testing / Offshore Drilling

Previously reported – September 2015
Resolution 15-09 is in opposition to offshore exploration and drilling. Why? Because we have a tourism based economy, along with the local fishing industry and quality of life depends on the health and welfare of our natural resources. We believe that the inherent risks to our region from offshore exploration and drilling have the potential to irrevocably harm our natural environment, our economic well-being and our overall quality of life. Including us there are now 79 municipalities that have passed resolutions opposing offshore exploration and drilling.

Previously reported – January 2018
Trump Moves to Open Nearly All Offshore Waters to Drilling
Read more » click here

Cooper: NC to sue if kept in offshore drilling plan
Governor threatens legal action if Trump administration pushes plan to open coast to oil exploration. “No way. Not off our coast,” Cooper said of oil exploration.
Read more » click here

North Carolina Gov. Cooper joins others in protest of federal fines for opposing offshore drilling
Read more » click here

County commissioners ignore pleas, won’t join opposition to offshore oil drilling
Activists who want to protect area beaches from offshore drilling took their pre-election message to the Brunswick County Board of Commissioners again. More than a dozen residents asked commissioners at their October 15 meeting to adopt a resolution opposing offshore drilling and seismic testing off the North Carolina coast. They have addressed commissioners each meeting since the board voted 4-1 in April to remove from the agenda a resolution offered by District 1 commissioner Randy Thompson. Thompson’s proposal would have positioned the county against offshore drilling, keeping it in line with the more than 140 Atlantic coastal communities and groups that have adopted resolutions. They include Southport, Oak Island, Bald Head Island, Caswell Beach, St. James and Holden Beach. “Elections are upon us,” Southport resident Michael Rice told commissioners. “Will we be governed by an unseen boss, or by representatives who listen to us and manage our county in our interests as we express them?” Since a resolution opposing offshore drilling hasn’t been introduced by the county, Rice presented one for commissioners to consider. It stated that commissioners “upon hearing the views of its citizens and municipalities in public forums, unequivocally opposes drilling for minerals in the waters off of our shores, and likewise opposes activities in such waters in furtherance of such drilling.” Commissioners did not respond and took no action.
Read more » click here

Update –

Trump admin. approves seismic tests for Atlantic offshore oil drilling
The approval moves forward a policy that many affected states don’t want.
On Friday, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) approved a plan to make it legal for five companies to conduct seismic testing off the Atlantic coast, in an area stretching from Delaware to Florida. The seismic testing is an initial step toward leasing federal offshore waters to oil companies that may want to drill there. In January, the Trump Administration opened up more than 90 percent of the federal offshore area to potential lease sales. Individual states largely oppose offshore drilling, fearing that another Deepwater Horizon disaster could ruin their tourism economies. But because state waters end three miles off the coast and federal waters aren’t subject to state rules, states have found themselves trying to negotiate with a mercurial federal government.
Read more » click here

Did drilling off NC coast just move one step closer?
Environmentalists sue NOAA after agency last month said companies could harass fish and mammals during seismic testing
A federal agency announced last month that companies exploring for oil and natural gas in the Atlantic Ocean could incidentally harass marine mammals using seismic airguns, a process that has been widely criticized by environmental groups and leaves the door open to further activity off the North Carolina coast.
Read more » click here

Groups sue feds to stop seismic airgun blasting in Atlantic Ocean
Leading environmental groups sued the federal government today to prevent seismic airgun blasting in the Atlantic Ocean. This extremely loud and dangerous process, which is used to search for oil and gas deposits deep below the ocean’s surface, is the first step toward offshore drilling. If allowed, seismic airgun blasting would harm marine life, including whales, dolphins, fish and zooplankton – the foundation of the ocean food web.

The lawsuit, filed in South Carolina, claims that the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) violated the Marine Mammal Protection Act, the Endangered Species Act and the National Environmental Policy Act when it issued Incidental Harassment Authorizations (IHAs) in late November. Those permits authorize five companies to harm or harass marine mammals while conducting seismic airgun blasting in an area twice the size of California, stretching from Cape May, New Jersey to Cape Canaveral, Florida.

The government has estimated that seismic airgun blasting in the Atlantic could harass or harm marine mammals like dolphins and whales – which depend on sound to feed, mate and communicate – hundreds of thousands of times. Seismic airgun blasting would also jeopardize the iconic North Atlantic right whale, a critically endangered species, according to 28 leading right whale experts.
Read more » click here

What did N.C. leaders do to reinforce their opposition to offshore drilling?
Less than a month after the federal government took an important step toward issuing seismic testing permits, North Carolina leaders have reiterated the state’s opposition to seismic and any other steps that could ultimately lead toward offshore drilling. Thursday, N.C. Governor Roy Cooper joined a bipartisan group of East Coast governors in a letter stating their strong opposition to both offshore drilling and seismic testing, while Attorney General Josh Stein was part of a group of attorneys general intervening in a lawsuit against the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS).
Read more » click here


Previously reported –

Holden Beach Newsletter

 

Chemours has issued a press release announcing that the company will take measures to eliminate byproduct GenX wastewater emissions from its Fayetteville site.
Click here to view the release.

In order to keep citizens informed, Brunswick County has established a website to share information about GenX as they learn it. You can find this page at www.brunswickcountync.gov/genx. The website contains a FAQ section that they update as they learn additional information (or receive additional questions), links to all their press releases and links to other resources like information from NCDEQ. There is also a link where citizens can go to sign up to receive email updates on the topic.


The Public Information Officer for Brunswick County announced that the County has taken legal action against DuPont and Chemours for contaminating the Cape Fear River.

10.31.2017
Statement from Brunswick County
The filing of formal legal action against Chemours and DuPont represents another crucial step in protecting our public drinking water supply. It sends a clear message that Brunswick County will simply not stand for the discharge of emerging or unregulated chemicals into our public drinking water supply. Let us be clear…we will ensure that any company that threatens this vital resource is held responsible. Furthermore, our litigation team is consulting the nation’s leading experts to determine the best long-term water testing and treatment methods for the entire county. As part of that, we will ensure that the costs for doing so do not fall upon the rate payers, but upon those dumping the unregulated chemicals in the water.
For more information » click here

Previously reported –June 2018
Southern Environmental Law Center files lawsuit calling for DEQ action on GenX
The Southern Environmental Law Center filed a lawsuit in New Hanover County Superior Court calling on the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality to use its authority to require the Chemours Company to immediately stop all discharge of GenX and other chemically related compounds from its Fayetteville Works facility.
Read more » click here

CFPUA: Filtering GenX can be done, but will cost customers
The Cape Fear Public Utility Authority (CFPUA) may move to spend $46 million to upgrade the Sweeney Water Treatment Plant to filter — as much as possible — contaminants like GenX and other material that the Wilmington plant can’t filter from water drawn from the Cape Fear River.
Read more » click here

Lawyers file suit against Chemours over GenX
Southern Environmental Law Center lawyers are suing The Chemours Co. on behalf of Cape Fear River Watch. Chemours is the maker of GenX, the contaminant found in the Cape Fear River, which provides the raw water the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority and the Brunswick County Utilities Department use for drinking water. The lawsuit was filed in Wilmington’s U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina Southern Division against Chemours for air and water pollution with toxic perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAs), including GenX, from the Chemours Fayetteville Works Facility in violation of the Clean Water Act and Toxic Substances Control Act. “Chemours’ decades-long contamination of North Carolina’s environment must stop to prevent more harm. The families and communities who drink from, swim in and fish on the Cape Fear River deserve healthy, clean water,” Senior Attorney Geoff Gisler said.
Read more » click here

CFPUA forges ahead with GenX solutions
The Cape Fear Public Utility Authority (CFPUA) moved forward Tuesday with both short- and long-term plans to remove chemicals such as GenX from its customers’ drinking water.
Read more » click here

Chemours to pay $12 million fine as part of GenX agreement
Proposed consent order requires Chemours to limit emissions at Fayetteville Works while also conducting studies

If approved by a Bladen County Superior Court Judge, the agreement would require the company to limit the discharges of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) such as GenX, while simultaneously providing water or treatment equipment to residents whose water shows high levels of PFAS. Chemours also agreed to pay a $12 million civil penalty that, if unaltered, would be the highest fine ever collected by the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality. The company will also pay $1 million in investigative costs, with additional fees built into the agreement such as $200,000 if it fails to reduce annual emissions by 82 percent from 2017 levels beginning Oct. 6, $350,000 if it fails to reduce emissions by 92 percent from 2017 levels beginning Dec. 31 and $1 million if it fails to reduce emissions by 99 percent from 2017 levels from 2020 on. In a statement, Michael Regan, the secretary of the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality, said, “People deserve access to clean drinking water, and this order is a significant step in our ongoing effort to protect North Carolina communities and the environment.”
Read more » click here

Update –

NCDEQ does all it plans to do on lower Cape Fear GenX contaminants
The North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality has done all it intends to do to address GenX and other per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAs) in the lower Cape Fear River, based on answers provided in a Nov. 29 media conference call. The agency agreed Nov. 21 with The Chemours Co. and Cape Fear River Watch on a proposed consent order to address per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAs), including GenX, that contaminated wells and the Cape Fear River, the source of drinking water for Brunswick County, from Chemours’ Fayetteville Works facility. The proposal would require Chemours to continue capturing all process wastewater from operations at the Fayetteville Works facility for off-site disposal until a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit is issued that authorizes wastewater discharge. It focuses on addressing contamination of well water and GenX compound air emissions near the plant, with Chemours required to connect well owners to water systems or install and maintain under-sink reverse osmosis drinking water systems if they have combined PFAs levels above 70 parts per trillion or any individual PFAs compound above 10 parts per trillion.

 DEQ Secretary for Environment Sheila Holman was asked why no other equipment or resources were made available to residents in the lower Cape Fear area. She said the DEQ and public pressure already forced Chemours to take steps to keep GenX out of the Cape Fear River and then the company stopped all wastewater discharge. “We will continue to monitor it,” Holman said. Holman said the proposed consent order was informed by the original investigation into GenX in the Cape Fear River from the Chemours discharge site at its Fayetteville Works plant. From there the DEQ further investigated PFAs in the groundwater, wells and air emissions. When asked about concerns the consent order doesn’t help residents downstream of the plant, Holman said the DEQ addressed those communities when it began requiring Chemours to collect wastewater and emissions to stop PFAs from entering the wastewater stream. “A lot has been geared to address the release of PFAs into the environment to protect those near the facility as well as downstream,” she said, adding the company took steps to stop Gen X from entering the Cape Fear River through other means like air emissions and groundwater. “We’ve tried to close these loops. We have Chemours monitoring the outfall. We worked hard to address all the ways (PFAS) get into the surface water. They are still trucking the wastewater out.”
Read more » click here

Why did CFPUA blast a proposed consent order between N.C. DEQ,
Chemours and Cape Fear River Watch?
State regulators are not looking out for the needs of residents or utilities downstream of Chemours’ Fayetteville Works facility, the Cape Fear Public Utility Authority (CFPUA) alleged in a pair of motions filed Thursday in Bladen County Superior Court.
Read more » click here 


Lockwood Folly Inlet Dredging
Town Manager David Hewett reported about a meeting in New Bern on Aug. 29 to discuss the long-term memorandum of agreement between the state and the Army Corps of Engineers and the status of shallow draft navigation channel dredging. He said some of the information he learned may be subject to change. The Murden hopper dredge was expected to come to Lockwood Folly Inlet, but that will not happening this year. Hewett said the dredge will instead be reprioritized to other projects elsewhere this year. He also said a plan for a project to dredge inlet crossing will not come to Holden Beach either, and sand from that project will be placed on Oak Island. Hewett said the contract to dredge Lockwood Folly Inlet is part of a larger corps contract to take care of all shallow draft inlets. He doesn’t know when dredging along the coast will actually start but said a major portion of the region for sand does not include Holden Beach. This is a result of a new interpretation of existing federal rules regarding local sponsorship of federal projects that require easements be obtained from local property owners in order to put sand on the beach. Butler said he and Sullivan also attended the New Bern meeting, and said Sullivan did a good job of challenging the corps on why they didn’t contact the town about this, including the status of the easements. He said the corps admitted it didn’t call the town and could’ve handled things better. He said the meeting was a wakeup call for better communication between the corps and the town “and I don’t like wakeup calls. I’m not a morning person,” he said. Sullivan said he wants to have Fran Way, senior coastal engineer for Applied Technology Management, perform an analysis about putting sand on the west end of Oak Island by the corps instead of putting the sand on the east end of Holden Beach. He said he wants the analysis done to show that it’s cheaper to drop the sand on the east end of the town than on the west end of Oak Island. Mayor Alan Holden echoed Butler’s sentiment that communication between the corps and town must improve for the town’s sake. “We’ve got to revamp our program or find ourselves really left out,” he said.
Read more » click here


Update –

Corps’ Rule Could Dash Town’s Sand Plan
Sand that Holden Beach has received for years to re-nourish its east-end oceanfront may instead go to a neighboring island, a prospect that caught town officials by surprise and questioning why the sudden change. The town is now in the process of obtaining some 60 property easements in the hopes of getting a shot at receiving sand the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers routinely pumps from the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, or AIWW, crossing at Lockwood Folly Inlet. The Corps has since 2002 given the dredged material to Holden Beach, but Corps officials in late August told town officials that the town would have to get easements and, since Holden Beach’s neighbor to the east, Oak Island, needs fewer easements, that town may get the sand. The news was a jolt to a town where its board of commissioners this past spring voted unanimously to withdraw a permit application to build a terminal groin at the east end, which loses about 60,000 cubic yards of sand a year, according to annual monitoring. “We were taken aback by it,” said Holden Beach Commissioner Joe Butler. “We were disturbed at the meeting, we honestly were. For X number of years that sand from Lockwood Folly has been placed on Holden Beach. Financially, it makes more sense to do it that way. From a sand-drift perspective, it makes more sense to do it that way.”  Lisa Parker, chief public affairs officer of the Corps’ Wilmington District, said in an email that the Corps is not implementing a new rule on easements, but rather easements “should have been required all along.” “In the past we have not required the town to provide us copies of easements to place sand on the beach,” Parker said. “Easements have always been required; as part of our preparation for doing these projects, we are now making sure they are in place before issuing contracts to do the work. The Corps has had permits to place beach compatible sand on adjacent beaches when dredging the AIWW for many years. The specific permit for the Lockwood Folly Inlet Crossing allows for sand to be placed on either Holden Beach or Oak Island.” Holden Beach Town Manager David Hewett said he doesn’t understand why the Corps is requiring easements because the sand is placed below the high-tide mark, which is under state ownership. “It’s below the high-tide mark, which, of course, ebbs and flows in the public trust area,” he said. “We’re proceeding with the attempt to acquire the easements, but our position is that it’s a redundant exercise.”

The implication of the Corps’ easement requirement will be wide-sweeping with other beach towns that have been the beneficiaries of sand dredged in federal projects having to supply documentation that can be timely and costly.

“The easement issue has never been an issue,” said Greg “Rudi” Rudolph, head of the Carteret County Shore Protection Office. “Now this time they’re telling us that we need easements. Any raised land, nourished beach becomes property of the state of North Carolina so why would you need easements of these upland areas anyway?”

A majority of the easements obtained along the Bogue Banks oceanfront are permanent, he said. “Does the Corps want a spreadsheet showing all the parcels? Do they want a hard copy of them all? Are the ones we have not good enough?” Rudolph asked.

Holden Beach is paying Applied Technology and Management Inc., or ATM, $40,000 to conduct a modeling project within the inlet to help make the town’s case for the sand. “We have accumulated some historical shoreline maps and provided those to the Army Corps of Engineers in support of our position,” Hewett said. ATM is the same company that identified a 1,000-foot-long terminal groin as the preferred erosion-control method at Holden Beach’s east end. One of the arguments made against the terminal groin was that routine re-nourishment of the east end, coupled with what is known as the Central Reach project, will be sufficient to combat erosion and less expensive than building a hardened structure. Terminal groins are wall-like structures built perpendicular to the shore at inlets to contain sand in areas of high erosion, like that of beaches at inlets. The first phase of the Central Reach project was completed more than a year ago and pumped about 1.3 million cubic yards of sand along about a 4-mile stretch of oceanfront in the middle of the island. Hewett said sand from the federal dredging project has been routinely placed on about a three-quarters-of-a-mile stretch of beach. These sand injections are included with the town’s beach monitoring program. “It’s more than 1,000 meters,” he said. “Every two years it varies, but it’s not unheard of to get up close to 200,000 cubic yards.” That’s not a lot of sand, but that amount is significant to the entire island, Hewett explained.

The town’s annual average erosion rate along the entire 9-mile stretch of oceanfront is about 200,000 cubic yards. The ocean current washes sand onto and sweeps sand off Holden Beach’s oceanfront from east to west. This is known as a littoral current, which develops parallel to the coast as waves break at an angle to the shoreline. “That sand benefits the entire island because it migrates east to west,” Hewett said. “The east end of Holden Beach is erosional and the west end of Holden Beach is accretional. That is a direct result of 40 years of putting the sand on the east end of Holden Beach and it migrating to the west.” For that reason, he argues, it doesn’t make sense to place the sand on the west end of Oak Island. “It’s a wrong decision from the logical side because of the east-west littoral drift,” Hewett said.

Holden Beach commissioners in October adopted a resolution which states, in part, “natural nearshore transport of sand via littoral drift occurs from east to west in Long Bay, making sand placement on the West End of Oak Island of time-limited benefit while increasing the negative impact on the LWF Inlet.” Oak Island Town Manager David Kelly did not return a call seeking comment. Brunswick County Deputy County Manager Steve Stone said he was surprised to hear that the Corps was requiring easements. “The county does not have an official written policy about the placement or the deposition of the sand,” he said. “But, I think there’s a general consensus that there should be some sort of management plan where sand would be shared between those two communities on some sort of rational basis. The county’s policy is that we want our beach communities to be successful. Ultimately, the towns are free agents.” Holden Beach anticipates spending roughly $30,000 in attorney fees to get the easements.

“We’re working just as hard as we can so, if we can, somehow through a Hail Mary so we can get what we can,” Hewett said.
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Holden Beach eyes sand from 2019 project to reinforce island’s east end
Holden Beach’s east end could receive sand from a possible Lockwood Folly Inlet project next year. The town’s inlet and beach protection board learned about the opportunity during their Nov. 29 meeting. In the email sent to Town Manager David Hewett, Oak Island Town Manager David Kelly and Brunswick County Manager Ann Hardy, Deputy County Manager Steve Stone said the county received a grant award contract from the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality Division of Water Resources for the Lockwood Folly Navigation Project submitted last summer. The application indicated the county would work to place the resultant beach-quality material, estimated to be in the range of 250,000 cubic yards, on one of the two beaches. The county is seeking feedback from Holden Beach and Oak Island before it pursues the project. Stone said county originally proposed paying 25 percent of the required local share, or $344,338, with the remaining 75 percent, or $1,033,013, to be paid by the town receiving the sand.

Hewett told Holden Beach commissioners at a special Aug. 30 meeting a plan for a project to dredge inlet crossing will not come to Holden Beach, but the sand will be placed on Oak Island, according to information he received during a Aug. 29 meeting in New Bern to discuss the long-term memorandum of agreement between the state and Army Corps of Engineers and the status of shallow draft navigation dredging. Hewett said at the special meeting this was the result of a new interpretation of existing rules regarding local sponsorship of federal projects that require easements to be obtained from local property owners in order to put sand on the beach.

Stone said while it is technically possible to place sand from a single project on both islands, it would increase the cost “significantly” and a “piggyback” contract might not offer enough time. The county suggests proceeding with a project “and that it is successful, that a future project place sand on an alternate island, presuming parties are receptive to such an arrangement.” Stone said DWR staff members are aware the project is unlikely to happen before fall 2019 but extending the period of performance could be granted. He said the county hopes to hear back from both municipalities by early January.

Assistant Town Manager Christy Ferguson asked inlet board members to come up with three potential special meeting dates to talk about the project before commissioners have their regular meeting Dec. 18. Inlet board members suggested Dec. 7, 10 or 11. Ferguson said Monday the special meeting will be 2 p.m. Dec. 7.

Fran Way, senior coastal engineer with Applied Technology & Management Inc. of Mount Pleasant, S.C., also attended the inlet board’s regular November meeting. Way said because the corps sand that would normally go on Holden Beach is going to Oak Island instead this time “that sand (mentioned in Stone’s email) cannot go on Oak Island.” “I think if that sand is not going on our east end, it’s not a good thing for Holden Beach,” he said, citing erosion there. “It’s only a good thing if we get the sand,” inlet board member Rhonda Dixon said. Way said the removal of 250,000 cubic yards from the inlet to place on the beach would be OK because studies show local inlets can have about 600,000 cubic yards taken and placed on the beach before any real adverse effects would be felt. Dixon said the worst-case scenario would be Oak Island getting all the sand mentioned in Stone’s email. “We can’t let that happen,” she said. Way said no matter which island receives the sand, it probably wouldn’t be placed until late next year at the earliest.

If the county submits for a permit in January, they might be lucky to get the permit by July, followed by a three- to four- month bidding process for the actual work, “assuming it can happen,” he said. “But then all of a sudden you throw in a hurricane and it throws everything off.”

The NCDEQ state coastal commission met Nov. 27-29 in Ocean Isle Beach, where it received an overview of coastal and community impacts from Hurricane Florence and Tropical Storm Michael. The commission also considered the town of Oak Island’s development line amendment, hearing about the progress in updating long-term erosion rates and dredged material management, and discussed new inlet hazard area delineations and management.
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Corps approves dredging contract; good news for Oak Island
After removing some of the optional jobs, such as grooming freshly renourished beaches, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has awarded a $3.3-million contract to Southwind Construction Co. for work on area waterways. The bid award is good news for Oak Island, which expects to receive 88,000 cubic yards of sand along an eroded section of the western part of the island near 69th Place West. It is expected to cover about 2,500 feet of beach.

It’s also possible the town will be able to contribute local money to the project to remove and place even more sand from the Lockwood Folly River crossing of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway. Brennan Dooley, shallow draft inlet manager for the Corps, said that the Corps was able to adjust the scope of work to get the contract out and there will be a pre-construction meeting on the timetable “soon.” The goal is to have the sand out of the inlet crossing and several other areas this winter. Whether the contractor will be able to place additional sand on Oak Island depends in part on how soon the job gets started and whether bad weather or other factors delay the jobs.

At Lockwood Folly, the channel is federally authorized to be 350 feet wide, while the contract calls for clearing a 90-foot area, so there is additional beach-quality sand available, officials have said. In additional to clearing the crossing, Corps officials intend to perform maintenance dredging of the Lockwood Folly inlet. Oak Island and other local officials are pressing the Corps to use a special-purpose hopper dredge for that work, instead of a sidecast dredge, which tosses the sand off to the side, something like a giant lawnmower. The hopper dredge can instead place sand in the nearshore environment, but not actually on the beach.
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Holden Beach inlet board recommends pursuing sand project

Holden Beach’s inlet and beach protection board recommended town commissioners pursue a project that could mean sand being placed on the east end of Holden Beach. In an email sent to Town Manager David Hewett, Oak Island Town Manager David Kelly and Brunswick County Manager Ann Hardy, Deputy County Manager Steve Stone said the county received a grant award contract from the North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality Division of Water Resources for the Lockwood Folly Navigation Project submitted last summer. The application indicated the county would work to place the resultant beach-quality material, estimated to be in the range of 250,000 cubic yards, on one of the two beaches. The county is seeking feedback from Holden Beach and Oak Island before it pursues the project. Stone said county originally proposed paying 25 percent of the required local share, or $344,338, with the remaining 75 percent, or $1,033,013, to be paid by the town receiving the sand. Stone said DWR staff members are aware the project is unlikely to happen before fall 2019 but extending the period of performance could be granted. He said the county hopes to hear back from both municipalities by early January. In its recommendation, the inlet board raised concerns such as what type of impact the removal of 250,000 cubic yards of sand for the project will have on both Holden Beach’s east end and Oak Island. It said the county’s engineers estimate the 250,000 cubic

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Corrections & Amplifications –

The National Flood Insurance Program
The National Flood Insurance Program aims to reduce the impact of flooding on private and public structures. It does so by providing affordable insurance to property owners and by encouraging communities to adopt and enforce floodplain management regulations. These efforts help mitigate the effects of flooding on new and improved structures. Overall, the program reduces the socio-economic impact of disasters by promoting the purchase and retention of general risk insurance, but also of flood insurance, specifically.
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Previously reported –
Your flood insurance premium is going up again, and that’s only the beginning
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Congress passes flood insurance extension, again punting on reforms
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Congress just dodged hard decisions about flood insurance again
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With the NFIP underwater, expand private sector’s role
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Key Insurance Pool Needs More Than A Life Preserver
Congress should permanently fix the broken National Flood Insurance Program
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Fixing the National Flood Insurance Program
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Realtors: Flood Insurance Program Needs Reau­tho­riza­tion
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Update –

National Flood Insurance Program: Reauthorization
Congress must periodically renew the NFIP’s statutory authority to operate. On July 31, 2018, the President signed legislation passed by Congress that extends the National Flood Insurance Program’s (NFIP’s) authorization to November 30, 2018. Congress must now reauthorize the NFIP by no later than 11:59 pm on December 21, 2018.

FEMA and Congress have never failed to honor the flood insurance contracts in place with NFIP policyholders. Should the NFIP’s authorization lapse, FEMA would still have authority to ensure the payment of valid claims with available funds. However, FEMA would stop selling and renewing policies for millions of properties in communities across the nation. Nationwide, the National Association of Realtors estimates that a lapse might impact approximately 40,000 home sale closings per month.

NFIP reauthorization is an opportunity for Congress to take bold steps to reduce the complexity of the program and strengthen the NFIP’s financial framework so that the program can continue helping individuals and communities take the critical step of securing flood insurance. The level of damage from the 2017 hurricanes makes it abundantly clear that FEMA needs a holistic plan to ready the Nation for managing the cost of catastrophic flooding under the NFIP.
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Breaking News – Congress extends the National Flood Insurance Program through May 31, 2019


Odds & Ends

 

Brunswick County recently announced that it will
reappraise real property as of January 1, 2019.

 

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Reappraisal is a process in which all real estate values are assessed at their market value as of a specific date. The purpose of a Reappraisal is to provide equalization among all types of properties. North Carolina General Statutes require each county to conduct a Reappraisal at least once every eight years. Brunswick County conducts a Reappraisal every four year. The last Reappraisal was effective January 1, 2015.

The Board of Commissioners will hold a Special Called Meeting at 3:00 p.m. on Thursday, August 30, 2018 in the Commissioners Chambers located in the David R. Sandifer Administration Building, 30 Government Center Drive, NE, Bolivia, NC.

The purpose of the meeting is to adopt the 2019 reappraisal Schedule of Values. A copy of the Schedule is available to the public in the office of the Brunswick County Tax Assessor, Brunswick County Government Center, 30 Government Center Drive NE, Bolivia, NC from 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Monday thru Friday, and on the County’s website. Click here for more information from the Brunswick County’s FAQ web page on this topic.


Christmas Trees Recycling
Christmas trees can be recycled to help build sand dunes on the beach. It is a way to build more protection on the shore by using them as a natural and biodegradable sand fencing. The trees are positioned facing downward at a 45-degree angle. Once the trees are laid down, they are left completely exposed except for the tips, which are covered in sand. The needles of the branches catch the sand and it starts to accumulate until gradually the sand will bury the tree and build up the dunes around them. As the tree biodegrades, it provides nutrients to the other plants and organisms around it.



Christmas Lights

Public Works have put up snow flake decorations on the boulevard light poles

 


This & That

Scientific consensus: Earth’s climate is warming
Multiple studies published in peer-reviewed scientific journals show that 97 percent or more of actively publishing climate scientists agree: Climate-warming trends over the past century are extremely likely due to human activities. In addition, most of the leading scientific organizations worldwide have issued public statements endorsing this position.
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76 Environmental Rules on the Way Out Under Trump
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U.S. Climate Report Warns of Damaged Environment and Shrinking Economy
A major scientific report issued by 13 federal agencies on Friday presents the starkest warnings to date of the consequences of climate change for the United States, predicting that if significant steps are not taken to rein in global warming, the damage will knock as much as 10 percent off the size of the American economy by century’s end. The report, which was mandated by Congress and made public by the White House, is notable not only for the precision of its calculations and bluntness of its conclusions, but also because its findings are directly at odds with President Trump’s agenda of environmental deregulation, which he asserts will spur economic growth.
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Climate Change Is Complex. We’ve Got Answers to Your Questions
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Major Trump administration climate report says damage is ‘intensifying across the country’
The federal government on Friday released a long-awaited report with an unmistakable message: The effects of climate change, including deadly wildfires, increasingly debilitating hurricanes and heat waves, are already battering the United States, and the danger of more such catastrophes is worsening.

The report’s authors, who represent numerous federal agencies, say they are more certain than ever that climate change poses a severe threat to Americans’ health and pocketbooks, as well as to the country’s infrastructure and natural resources. And while it avoids policy recommendations, the report’s sense of urgency and alarm stands in stark contrast to the lack of any apparent plan from President Trump to tackle the problems, which, according to the government he runs, are increasingly dire.

The congressionally mandated document — the first of its kind issued during the Trump administration — details how climate-fueled disasters and other types of worrisome changes are becoming more commonplace throughout the country and how much worse they could become in the absence of efforts to combat global warming.
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FOURTH NATIONAL CLIMATE ASSESSMENT
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Factoid That May Interest Only Me –

Watch out for deer
NCDOT warns motorists across North Carolina to stay alert for deer now that fall has arrived. Every year during late autumn, auto and body shops across the region brace for a bumper crop of business, comprised of an influx of cars with damage from collisions with deer. Beginning in October, roads across the state become hazardous as North Carolina’s deer population fans out, lurking on highway shoulders in search of food and potential mates. It’s the deadliest time of the year for deer, which also pose a particular danger to motorists. Nearly half of vehicle accidents involving white-tail deer occur from October to December. Deer accidents typically begin rising in October, peak in November and begin dropping off after December, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Deer are crepuscular mammals, meaning they’re most active at dawn and dusk – which, following the onset of daylight savings time, places them near roads and byways precisely when large numbers of residents are commuting to and from work.


Nation’s biting fire ant invasion expands north again through heart of North Carolina
The plague of invasive, aggressive fire ants in North Carolina has shifted further north and west, prompting the state to add three more counties to the official “fire ant quarantine” area. The latest northward shift of the quarantine zone means 75 of North Carolina’s 100 counties are now considered home to a pest know for swarming and stinging, says the department.
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What We Know About Diet and Weight Loss
After decades of research, there are shockingly few firm conclusions.
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Things I Think I Think –

Dining #2Eating out is one of the great little joys of life.

Restaurant Review:
Dinner Club visits a new restaurant once a month. Ratings reflect the reviewer’s reaction to food, ambience and service, with price taken into consideration.
///// October 2018
Name:             Turtle Island 
Cuisine:          American
Location:       6220 East Oak Island Drive, Oak Island NC
Contact:         910.278.4944 /
NA
Food:              Average / Very Good / Excellent / Exceptional
Service:          Efficient / Proficient / Professional / Expert
Ambience:     Drab / Plain / Distinct / Elegant
Cost:                Inexpensive <=17 / Moderate <=22 / Expensive <=27 / Exorbitant <=40
Rating:           One Star
A seafood-driven menu, where the high prices do not reflect the laid-back beach atmosphere. Frankly, I was not impressed, and I just can’t really find anything good to say about this place.


Book Review:
Read several books from The New York Times best sellers fiction list monthly
Selection represents this month’s pick of the litter
/////

 

THEN SHE WAS GONE by Lisa Jewell
Ten years after her teenage daughter disappears, a woman tries to get her life in order but remains haunted by unanswered questions. Brilliantly bizarre story, with plenty of twists and turns.

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Wishing you and yours a Happy Holiday!Poinsetta


HBPOIN / Lou’s Views
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